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Got a Klipsch history question for historian Jim Hunter? Ask here! 

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  1. Welcome!

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  • Recent Posts

    • Those crazy Turkeys, if he can't even figure out if you can not hear anything he says what else has he not thought about. Like maby a parachute just in case his contraption falls apart in the air. 
    • LOL.  I hear it and peg it every time.
    • Did you move your post to another section?     Here is my attempt to start answering your question:"How Much Amplifier Power Do I Need?" The amount of amplifier power needed is not as simple as it is sometimes depicted.     Need more information:   What speakers? Brand and model.  Sensitivity rating if available.   Room size.   Room liveness: Treatments?  What kind? Carpet?  Wall to wall, area rugs("throw" rugs)?  Drapes?  Photograph.   Distance from main listening position to speakers.   Type of music.   Loudness preference (Klipsch and Keel , Jr's  characterizations, DFH, Vol. 16, No. 1, January 1977 ):      Medium                  85 dB Loud                        90 to 100 dB Very Loud:             105 to 110 dB [105 dB is THX full scale (peak) above about 80 Hz; 115 dB is THX full scale (below 80 Hz). Too Damn Loud   115 dB A huge variable is the brand and model of speaker.  The range of amplifier power ranges from 3 watts to > 1,000 watts, depending on the above variables.
    • The original Forte's woofer had a corrugated paper surround. The Forte II has a rubber like surround. The Forte III has gone back to the corrugated paper style surround. Just out of curiosity I would like to know why the changes back and forth. Thanks, John 
    • Speaking of food and drink. Thread tie in. 👍  One of the coolest things I've seen in a while.  Chillin on the couch,  soaring through the air, having a snack.  A bit of wind noise, skip ahead to about 1:20 for the take off.     
    • Now Steve.....that's pushing it.
    • I suppose you're talking about certain Klipsch models, but you didn't specify which ones.  That gives me the license to respond how I see it.   I've found that dialed-in Klipsch Jubilees exhibit the depth of the recording itself.  The Chesky "Ultimate Demonstration Disc" has a track to demonstrate depth of stereo image capability (track #5--"If I Could Sing the Blues" by Sara K).  No problems there.  The Jubilees however don't add artificial stereo depth however--as I would expect that "reviews" as you put it would expect, i.e., depth that's not actually in the recording.    The issue of depth of stereo imaging actually has a couple of measurements that can tie the imaging performance of the loudspeakers to that subjective capability: Flat phase and SPL response.  This implies time alignment of drivers.  Only the Jubilees and other DSP crossover-aligned loudspeakers have this capability. Wide polar coverage above 200 Hz. There is one other effect that can give the listener an impression of greater depth of stereo soundstage image: dipole or bipole radiation into the room.  This means that a lot of sound is reflected off the front and side walls of the room--like Bose advocates.  The problem with this is that bouncing a lot of sound off the walls, ceiling and floor actually destroys the fidelity of the stereo imaging but gives the listener an impression of greater depth or presence.  This isn't a desirable trade off, in my experience.  True dipole loudspeakers (like Magnepan, etc.) have the issue of "head-in-a-vise" imaging.  I don't think that's a very good tradeoff, either.   To get both soundstage focus (i.e., being able to point at individual sources of sound within the horizontal stereo image), wall-to-wall imaging and greater front-to-back depth requires loudspeakers having great phase and SPL fidelity, as well as full-range directivity control.  Jubilees do that...in spades.  But I can think of no other Klipsch models that do all that well (except perhaps an MCM Grand or some other Klipsch Professional [cinema] loudspeakers having full-range directivity).    I'll stop there.   Chris
    • True, got my own card not long ago, the wife got tired of me saying, hey come pay for this.   Not true, do something dumb, we will laugh at you.   "I'll be Sad"  well we do not really do that very well around here, bunch of old hard azzes, well Oldtimer anyway.    If we talk with you we like you, we even like Steve.   
    • I can tell where the inspiration NOT to play a certain instrument comes from.  When I was in Jr. High, I wanted to play drums. School was a mile away and carrying that huge case got old real quick.  Told my Dad that I was quitting and he told me that if I was smart I would have chosen to play the spoons. 
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