Jump to content

Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation on 08/01/21 in all areas

  1. From what I read, the problem with the delta variant is that it is much more easily spread and it can infect those already vaccinated. A vaccination does not prevent one from contracting and spreading the delta variant, but it does protect one from serious illness or death. The current surges of serious Covid cases are overwhelmingly among the unvaccinated. As a Pfizer x 2 vaccinated person, I am more concerned about exposing the unvaccinated to the delta variant than I am about the extremely unlikely chance that I could suffer serious illness or death from the delta variant. When I wear a mask in public it is more to protect others, especially the unvaccinated, than to protect myself. I’m especially concerned about those under 12 who cannot be vaccinated.
    7 points
  2. Not directed at ANY ONE person but all. Please don't turn this into a virus thread in any way or it will be locked and I hate to see that happen. .
    6 points
  3. But if you run over it enough no grass, probably more fun anyway.
    3 points
  4. Them babies is mine!😀
    3 points
  5. 3 points
  6. Agree, but courtesy, knowledge and sense are not as common as they should be.
    3 points
  7. I see masks as a common courtesy in these days --------------------------- my roof patches must have been good.... the rain has stopped. We are being serenaded by the sound of lawnmowers. Folks are asking about renting goats. Serious
    3 points
  8. some are plain black -----rat fur means the wood underneath is mint raw birch , no scratches or bruises ----the glue cleans right off with citrus paint remover -
    3 points
  9. Time to tighten up the ship today! Decided to slip the VPI in at the end of the shelf then one move to the table and GO! The joys of RB LS? Somewhere to put things and they don't show dirt! and dust! Big pile to un-zip since I haven't had time to do squat. Decided to chase a few woven dreams tonight with this new release. Sounds amazing IF you liked the old pressing you're gonna love this one! Time to get this show on the road in here!
    3 points
  10. I enjoyed his YouTube presentation, but cringed whenever he said 35mm TAPE. As far as I know, such a thing never existed. It was 35mm full coat magnetic FILM, as he finally says a few times. And, being film, I believe it was approx 6 times as thick as tape, thus the lower print through he talks about. The potential magnetic surface was 24 mm (a little less than one inch) wide, but fairly wide spacing was included between and around the 3 tracks. They could afford it! As many of us know, Cinerama used a separate 35 mm magnetic film (even in the theater) for sound starting with This Is Cinerama in 1952, carrying SEVEN separate tracks, each 3.43mm wide (including spacing) just a bit wider than 1/2 track tape (including spacing). The system was developed by Hazard E. Reeves of Reeves Soundcraft, makers of recording tape, and recorders of jazz, and other music, as well as later 70mm soundtracks, which often used 35mm mag film in the studio, for 6 track recordings, moving at > 22 i.p.s. For 70mm in the theater the 6 mag sound stripes were on the two edges of the film, and also crammed between the sprocket holes and the image, totaling 9.06mm, not the 5mm usually reported by people who can subtract 65mm (camera film) from 70mm (projector film for these processes) quite well, and get 5mm, but don't know that the image is reduced just a bit to allow for the 9.06mm magnetic coating -- 1.51mm each track. The first two "modern" 70mm presentations, Oklahoma! and Around the World in 80 Days were presented in 70mm Todd-AO in "double system" with separate 35mm mag film carrying the 6 soundtracks in a few theaters. A picture of the soundtrack-less, truly 65 mm picture film that would have been run in double system is in Arthur Knight's The Liveliest Art, facing page 76 in my paperback copy. Knight calls it a 70m frame, but in this special case, it is 65mm due to no soundtracks, and hasn't been "printed in" to a 48.5mm image width to make room for them. I believe I saw them that way as a school kid, because they sounded terrific, and as dynamic as all get out. Those experiences made me an audiophile. Neither vinyls sound good at all, and 80 Days, obviously dubbed to ordinary tape for transfer to vinyl, has miles of easily audible print through, should you ever need an example. The Canadian expanded version CD manages to avoid this, but still doesn't capture the incredible fidelity. The DVD of 80 Days and the Blu-ray of Oklahoma! come much closer. Crank 'em up! The Mercury, Everest, and Command 35mm albums vary considerably. The best of the bunch (that I've heard) is the Mercury sampler/demo seen here:@VDS, you say, "dynamic range is the quality I love, the immediacy, the physicality." Me too! If you can play vinyl, play the Rachmaninoff that opens this disk, loudly, and you will be as happy as a clam! Unfortunately, I can't find it on CD or SACD. I believe the original recording was done in 1962.
    3 points
  11. 3 points
  12. I dont drink coffee ----- if I take a cup of coffee -- I can work 2 days non-stop ---it's like dynamite ----but I love the smell of coffee--just cant drink it
    3 points
  13. Yeah, I guess I'm going down the Industrial rabbit hole. I got a set of HIPs from DaveA awhile back with his tweeters and love 'em in my shop building. I can make room for Lascalas.🙂
    2 points
  14. ^^^^^ Saw that coming from the get-go. As one famous deputy sheriff said- “Nip it, nip it in the bud” — . Or - spend the night with Otis -
    2 points
  15. congrats @chassell I have a pair very similar, only splits. Built like tanks. Great sounding speakers especially outside. May need a little TLC but worth the work.
    2 points
  16. the weeds won.... no cutting decks on those mowers, George
    2 points
  17. No....from the Ebay seller direct to the largest and most respected Mac dealer in the world. The preamp is 60 years old...I voice all my vintage RTR's,Accuphase,and the rest. It's just how I roll.
    2 points
  18. Congratulations @chassell!
    2 points
  19. Guessing you ran the unit before having the service work and will be able to hear the difference.
    2 points
  20. OP: I’m late in joining. (I haven’t had much time for forum activity in recent months due to being occupied with projects.) I’ll offer a short answer, and a long-winded one. Short Answer I’ll offer two quick examples that come to mind that are excellent state-of-the-art recordings of music that has significant dynamic range. (Perhaps I should say they are “near” state-of-the-art because they are Blu-ray vs. Ultra HD Blu-ray.) If you want to experience what a modern recording can deliver for large-scale orchestral music that has significant dynamic range, then play this Blu-ray of Mahler Symphony 2 on a high-quality surround-sound system equipped with large front, center, and right speakers, and large subwoofers. (And, of course, an HDTV to see the concert.) The following Blu-ray disc includes 2008 performances by Valery Gergiev, featuring the Mariinsky Orchestra and Ballet, in the Ballets Russes’ production of: The Firebird The Rite of Spring This Blu-ray features excellent quality 1080 high-definition video, and DTS-HD MA 5.1 audio (plus, of course, a hi-res stereo track). If you want to experience the full dynamic impact of The Rite of Spring, listen to the DTS-HD MA 5.1 surround-sound audio track, employing a surround-sound hi-fi system that features large speakers and subwoofers. (I listened on a system with a 15” powered subwoofer, plus a 16” powered sub, and front (L&R), center, and rear speakers that each have two 10” woofers - i.e., a total of eight 10” woofers plus two relatively large subwoofers. I say “relatively large” because some subwoofer aficionados would describe a 16” subwoofer as “mid-size”.) The timpani and bass drum that my hi-fi system delivered from this recording were articulate, had natural timber, and – at times – were EXPLOSIVE. I think that it’s interesting that in this performance of The Rite of Spring, the dancers sometimes clapped their hands, stomped their feet, and pounded the floor – which apparently is true to the original performance. (Based on what I understand from the included documentary.) The Rite of Spring isn’t quite my cup of tea, but I’m glad to have this modern audio/video recording of the music and ballet. I very much enjoyed The Firebird – including the costumes, dancing, and music. Ekaterina Kondaurova looks beautiful dancing the role of the firebird. (IMO.) The high-definition video delivers a stunning visual presentation of the dancers, costumes, and scenery. Long Answer I hope that members will pardon the fact that I’ve hurriedly cobbled together content from some of my previous posts. (I’m afraid that I don’t have much time today to edit for conciseness.) I enjoy classical music and opera, which (in my city) are performed live in a world-class purpose-built symphony hall (and opera house) where music is performed with no use of a sound reinforcement system, and there are no electronically produced sounds. (In other words, the music involves 100% natural sound produced by orchestral instruments.) My benchmark for the sound quality from my hi-fi systems is classical music performed live in its intended venue. Before coronavirus caused all concerts to be canceled, I attended more than 30 classical concerts each year, including season tickets to the symphony, and opera, plus several chamber concerts. Recognizing some variance in instruments and halls, I have a pretty good idea (technical term) for how orchestral instruments (e.g., violin, clarinet, trumpet, timpani, etc.) sound. My goal for the sound quality of recorded classical music played via my home hi-fi systems is to create the illusion that I’m in the symphony hall or opera house where classical music was performed live, and for inevitable deviations to sound pleasant vs. unpleasant – to my ears. One of my priorities is for the timbre of the orchestra instruments to sound natural. And I want my hi-fi systems to achieve dynamic range that approaches the live concert experience. Classical music lovers know that large-scale orchestral music can have significant dynamic range. I often cite Mahler Symphony 2 as an example. That's why I recommended the Blu-ray recording above. Certainly, recorded music can be enjoyed with less than state-of-the-art recordings and hi-fi systems. Classical music lovers sometimes must decide which is more important: performance quality, or audio quality of a recording. I’m not a music scholar, and I’m not hyper-critical of a performance. Very often I enjoy modern performances of classical music. However, I have no tolerance for poor audio quality. I therefore choose modern performances (i.e., last dozen years or so) of classical music that were recorded in hi-res (e.g., 24bit/192kHz PCM), and delivered in a hi-res format. My preferences for recording technologies: My favorite is modern performances/recordings (last dozen years or so) that were captured and mastered in hi-res (e.g., 24bit/192kHZ) multi-channel, and delivered on a Blu-ray audio/video disc featuring DTS-HD MA 5.0 (or 5.1) surround-sound. (A few Ultra HD Blu-ray opera recordings are starting to become available.) My second choice in formats are SACD and Pure Audio Blu-ray that feature surround-sound. (No video.) My third choice are 24bit/96kHz or 24bit/192kHz FLAC stereo downloads (e.g., HDTracks). In all cases provenance of the recording is critical – i.e., modern recordings that were captured and mastered as hi-res. (In a few cases high quality analog master tapes have been digitized at hi-res with fairly good results - e.g., some RCA Living Stereo, and Mercury Living Presence. However, IME these vintage recordings pale in comparison to modern state-of-the-art hi-res multi-channel recordings.) I understand that some people prefer to ignore the visual component of music. For example, some people prefer to listen to an audio-only recording of opera (perhaps because they are primarily aficionados of operatic singing). OTOH, others (including me) feel that the acting and scenery are an important part of an opera’s storytelling, and therefore prefer a Blu-ray audio/video recording. Blu-ray offers another significant benefit for opera: displaying the libretto (in one of several languages) on the HDTV screen. IMO the visual component of ballet is even more important. However, some people just listen to the ballet’s music. IMO, Blu-ray’s high-resolution video is also very enjoyable for classical orchestral concerts - i.e., seeing the conductor, musicians, and venue. Blu-ray has enabled me to see many symphony halls and opera houses around the world that I otherwise would have never seen. And some of the conductors and musicians are enjoyable to watch. Hi-fi sound reproduction is not limited to 2-channel audio-only recordings. There are countless modern multi-channel recordings, and IMO/IME these can far surpass the enjoyment delivered by 2 channel play-back. IME, one of the benefits of Blu-ray DTS-HD 5.1 is the potentially greater dynamic range compared with stereo. IME/IMO, the biggest advance in recorded music in recent years has been the availability of hi-res recordings of modern performances (last dozen years or so) of classical music, opera, and ballet delivered on Blu-ray audio/video discs featuring DTS-HD MA multi-channel audio, and high-definition video. Ultra HD Blu-ray recordings are slowly becoming available. When I connect my Oppo UDP-205 to vintage tube amps to drive high-end Klipsch speakers in a surround-sound configuration (including subwoofers), this configuration delivers a near-symphony-concert-hall experience. For classical music, Blu-ray audio/video, Ultra HD Blu-ray, Pure Audio Blu-ray, SACD, and hi-res (e.g., 24bit/192kHz, or DSD) downloads are indispensable. IME/IMO, multichannel is FAR superior to stereo for classical music. And, hi-res audio is superior to Redbook CD. In my basement system (average size room), I have no problems with dynamics or deep bass, for any music. Front, center, and left speakers are Klipsch RF-7 II. A single rear speaker is a Klipsch RF-7. Subwoofers: SVS SB16-Ultra, Klipsch R-115SW. Source: Oppo UDP-205 universal player, playing hi-res recordings of large-scale classical music. (The Oppo provides the bass management function, meaning that the power-hungry bass is off-loaded from the main amp and speakers.) I have multiple tube amps in this system. If I use, for example, a Scott 296 to drive the left and right channels, and a Fisher KX-200 (or Scott 272) to drive the center and (single) rear channel, there is dynamic range and frequency range approaching a live concert in a symphony hall. (These tube amps each produce approximately 30 - 40 wpc. If I want more muscle, I’ll use my LK150 which produces about 58wpc.) No problems with dynamics, or deep bass, for any genre of music. (For big-band music or folk music, my 8wpc single-ended pentode amp is adequate) I’ve converted 4 of my 5 hi-fi systems to multi-channel, because IMO – when playing modern classical recordings – the experience is far superior to listening to stereo. There are countless modern (last dozen years or so) recordings of classical compositions that were recorded and mastered in modern “hi-res” formats, and delivered on Blu-ray or SACD. IME, you can’t make a silk purse from a SOW’s ear. Garbage-in / garbage-out. Provenance of a recording is extremely important. Delivering a vintage recording in a “hi-res” wrapper doesn’t magically improve its quality. If you pour 5 gallons of milk into a 55-gallon drum, it’s still 5 gallons. (Recorded music can be enjoyed with less than state-of-the-art recordings and hi-fi systems. With that said, my point is that historic performances are limited to technology available at the time of the recording.) I’ll post just a few examples of modern recordings here. I you’d like I can post more recommendations in later posts, or you may wish to join this discussion on talkclassical.com: https://www.talkclassical.com/54011-blu-ray-videos-classical.html Rafael Frühbeck de Burgos Danish NSO Ludwig van Beethoven: Symphonies Nos. 1–9 Joaquín Rodrigo: Concierto de Aranjuez Hector Berlioz: Symphonie fantastique, Op. 14 Richard Strauss: Eine Alpensinfonie (An Alpine Symphony), Op. 64, TrV 233 (I own 3 other Blu-ray audio/video box sets of modern performances of all Beethoven symphonies.) Jean Sibelius: Complete Symphonies "Tchaikovsky, The Complete Symphonies". Brahms symphonies by Paavo Järvi conducting the Deutsche Kammerphilharmonie Bremen. Schumann Symphonies The latest concert series on Blu-ray that I’m enjoying: Bruckner Symphonies 1-9. Christian Thielemann conducting the Staatskapelle Dresden in 2012 – 2019 performances at several different venues. I have this Blu-ray box set of Mahler symphonies on order: I own two different Blu-ray recordings of Brahms’ Ein Deutsches Requiem. My favorite is Franz Welser-Möst leading the Cleveland Orchestra in a 2016 performance at the Stiftsbasilika St. Florian in Austria. IMO this is an excellent example of what Blu-ray can offer – i.e., outstanding audio and video quality. Beautiful venue. I loved the performance. I also have several other Blu-ray audio/video box sets of symphonies. Plus several other classical concerts on Blu-ray. Plus numerous modern opera and ballet audio/video recordings on Blu-ray. (And a few in Ultra HD Blu-ray.) (Plus, many classical recordings on SACD.) After experiencing modern audio/video concert videos featuring high-def video, and hi-res audio featuring surround-sound, I greatly prefer this to listening to CDs (or streaming). As I mentioned earlier, you may wish to join this discussion on talkclassical.com: https://www.talkclassical.com/54011-blu-ray-videos-classical.html
    2 points
  21. Listening in the background is really important to me and let me explain why. I too listen to FM radio in the car and while cooking. Over the years, there have been many occasions when I discovered new(to me) recordings, pieces, compositions like that. On the very moment, they triggered a wow-reaction and then I would wait until the presenter would give the details so I could buy the CD or listen to it again. If the details were not given, I have to look up the Playlist on the radio station's website. I still remember discovering Gorecky's 3rd Symphony, and many good jazz and blues recording like that. For me, fm/radio is like a gateway to new discoveries. It is a means to expose myself to artists, recordings, genres I don't know yet, and it makes my Melo-life a lot richer!
    2 points
  22. Yes, the TAD and some JBLs also had a snout that expanded from a 1.4 to a 2inch exit. These were done by design and had a thought out expansion of the cross-sectional area and taper. A generic adapter may or may not be a good substitute. However, we are not certain what the poster was specifically considering. So it is probably best to shy away from an adapter (small-to-large) and certainly avoid an adapter that is large-to-small.
    2 points
  23. I know what they are, I saw the thread. I was kidding. They are gorgeous.
    2 points
  24. Even the venerable TAD 4002 driver uses a 1.4 to 2" adapter.
    2 points
  25. His speakers have different high / low htz specks We had many listening sessions with several different configurations until we came to this setup My ears were used to fine tune the crossover points It’s been a while since I was over there and I’m sure no resistors were used in the final build Look closely at the system photo and you will see a test crossover on top of the speaker 😎
    2 points
  26. I got my stuff! Really enjoying the book!
    2 points
  27. cats seem to know who is allergic to them or doesn't like them... and them get in their face. ... so yeah...just to piss you off
    2 points
  28. Stocking up on some good beans I found a Costa Rican natural process that will keep the sirens away from here for us
    2 points
  29. Well I don't like cats either. They like me however. I think it's just to piss me off.
    2 points
  30. Audiolot monoblocks. Based on 6C33C tubes. Made in Ukraine
    2 points
  31. Because the fortes were all around better, and now up to v4.
    2 points
  32. No affiliation https://www.usaudiomart.com/details/649762185-edgar-horn-speakers-signature-field-coils/images/3385146/
    1 point
  33. Dust in a baggie
    1 point
  34. What is disco? 4 on the floor with high-hat? "ZZ Top released Eliminator on March 23, 1983. MTV was exploding onto pop culture. The album's mix of dirty blues riffs and dance-floor-friendly drum machine rhythms was just the ticket."
    1 point
  35. I read the before and after specs, what happened in between?
    1 point
  36. I'd have to dig for it, I'll DM you later. After I finished it, my mom actually decided she didn't want it (Ugh!) So she now has a very nice system built on Yamaha and Nak gear (plus your Technics TT) with Forte I's. The console went to a lady I know at work.
    1 point
  37. im not trying to be a wise guy here & this is a serious question: what cleaning or service does any given piece of audio equipment need each year? what exactly is being cleaned or serviced yearly? what environment is the equipment in that requires a yearly cleaning or parts to be serviced? im seriously at a loss to understand this & have never heard of anyone doing such a thing. cleaning & service as needed is understandable or for older gear thats never been cleaned or needs service, but every year paying someone to pull 4 screws & remove the top to blow out a micro layer of dust is new to me, & it does not in any way harm or degrade the components inside. what do they charge for this service?
    1 point
  38. I get it. If I didn't have my hypex amp serviced annually, I would be guessing if it would turn on every time I tried to fire it up. If it had dust, it's trash.
    1 point
  39. I almost grabbed a pair of these a couple of years back, can't get past the rat fur coating...but they are one hell of a speaker!
    1 point
  40. Paul , coming back to yours and your friend´s 3 Way X-Over´s .......no resistors are used in such a three way network , can you explain what´s behind ?
    1 point
  41. Brian May is making good on his promise. "Anyone up for a BM release with lots of juicy extras?" the legendary Queen guitarist asked his fans on Instagram some time ago - and announced, "We have a plan." Unsurprisingly, the fans' answer was a resounding "yes." Now May delivers. His solo debut album Back To The Light will be released on August 6, 2021 as a remastered edition with, as announced, plenty of extras. Those were turbulent times when Brian May released his solo debut Back To The Light in 1992. The year before, Queen frontman Freddie Mercury had passed away. On April 29, 1992, May had already introduced a new song to fans at the Freddie Mercury Tribute Concert, the track Too Much Love Will Kill You. A few months later, on September 28, 1992, May's solo debut Back To The Light was finally released (in the U.S. and Canada, the long player was not released until February 2, 1993). The album was well received and reached the sixth place in the album charts in Great Britain. Now Back To The Light is being re-released - and in several editions. The centerpiece of the release is undoubtedly the Collector's Edition box set. Included in it: an exclusive white vinyl LP, two CDs, a 32-page book, a 12″ art print, a download card and an enamel plaque. If you want it even more exclusive, grab the 1000-piece limited edition box set. This includes a signed 12-inch art print and is available in the Queen online store. If that's too extensive for you, you can also choose other formats. The album is also available af 1LP black 180g vinyl, 1CD, deluxe 2CD, cassette and digital formats. A bonus album of special versions and live tracks called Out Of The Light is available in the box set, 2CD edition and digital formats. In addition, vinyl fans can look forward to a picture disc, which will be released in limited edition in the Queen online store. Brian May has written new liner notes for the new edition. In them, May pens a tribute to the record's late drummer, Cozy Powell, and reflects on the album's era. The guitarist also hints at further releases, saying, "This is part of a series. The Brian May Gold Series. Every piece of it will have a little gold stamp on it. And each of them will give me the opportunity to rediscover the path I've been on." For the remaster they got prominent support: Grammy Award winner Bob Ludwig worked with the original, restored flat mixes - and brought the sound of Back To The Light into the present.
    1 point
  42. There's carling canada, but also Carling from Europe, well UK. Two very different beers. Our Story | Carling Burton on Trent
    1 point
  43. I've checked the site twice a day since it was announced and gone thru the hoops. That's the coffee table book for those who walk in, sit down and go WOW, "What kind of speakers are those? What do all the others there sound like?" I just wanna point to the book and let THEM research. Makes pulling albums out to play a bit easier. Gives them something to do. 😂 I also, like many others in here, want to support the museum in any way I can. If you're not a member in here already ya should be. For $10 a month there aren't many perks but when ya hang with this bunch the fun alone is worth the $120 a year membership not to mention what you can LEARN from the site. 😂 It'll sort out.
    1 point
  44. All items on the 75th Anniversary Gear Shop page have been listed there as priced and sold out for months. Yesterday everything but the signed Museum Edition of the book became available. Don't know when the signed edition will be made available.
    1 point
  45. Time for some Santana from one of my favourite albums
    1 point
  46. I got my first pair for $36 at a garage sale in pretty good condition .
    1 point
  47. If the OP is interested, I have a a pair of these in strorage if you are interested. Beware that shipping is pricey. Please PM if there are any questions. Yes, they do sound good in a two way or three way system. -Tom
    1 point
×
×
  • Create New...