Jump to content

Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation on 07/15/22 in all areas

  1. Thanks to the piano movers I can finally listen to these bad boys. The move in went smoothly. After assessing the situation, this is what the three men did. First thing they did was set up a metal ramp that reached from my front walk, over the front stoop and up the additional step to the door. They unboxed the bass bins in the garage. For each one, they tipped it forward onto a rubber-topped moving dolly with a furniture blanket over it to get it off the pallet and get the foam off the bottom. They stood it up to get the dolly out from under the front and then tipped it backward a bit to get the dolly underneath the bottom. They then carefully rolled it up the ramp, through the front door, and put them in place in their respective corners. They just carried in the HF sections in and set them on top of the bass bins. I didn’t get to take many pictures or videos because I was helping, moving boxes/packing out of the way, opening doors, etc. (I took two short videos of one bass bin rolling around, but they are too big to upload here.) I had wired in the DSP ahead of time. I’m glad I color coded my interconnects and speaker wires to make sure my connections were correct. So, once I hooked up the HF drivers to the binding posts and plugged in the speaker wires, we were ready to hear something. I asked the piano movers if they wanted to hear anything. The company owner said Pink Floyd. 😊 So, I grabbed my old Mobile Fidelity CD of Dark Side of the Moon. At first, we heard nothing and boy, was I worried. Turns out that I had set the DSP to Auto On but apparently that wasn’t working the way I expected. Once I manually turned it on, then we had music. I started with both DSP gain knobs at the middle (12 o’clock or 5 out of 10) position as Roy suggested. The bass was a bit much that way. I slowly increased the HF gain and settled at just less than one additional marking higher (like 5.8 out of 10). The piano movers were amazed. After listening to that for a while, the piano movers left to go to another job. I then started a re-listen of the playlist I used to evaluate the Jubilee at JubFest last October (https://music.amazon.com/user-playlists/dd125d8dc60b40389c79ee7faf583094sune?ref=dm_sh_cdb4-5933-bdcd-794b-eb995). Man, @Chief bonehead was right. These behemoths sound awesome in my smallish living room. I guess smaller rooms do need bigger horns. 😊 This isn’t the first time I’ve heard these speakers and they are as great here in my house as I remember them being in the Klipsch lab listening room at JubFest. If I had to describe the sound it a few words it would be dynamics, detail, imaging, and integration. I have never heard a speaker with greater dynamic range than these. Everything is so percussive and life-like that you feel like you could touch it. The amount of detail I’m hearing for the first time in some very familiar recordings is extraordinary. The imaging is also unbelievable. The first cut off Jazz at the Pawnshop made me feel like I was sitting in the Jazzpuben Stampen in Stockholm where the album was recorded. I could close my eyes and “see” the clinking dinner plates and people talking in the background. Finally, the integration or “oneness” on the sound is fantastic. I thought I had good integration of my P-39F with the three subs in that system, but that’s got nothing on hearing the entire frequency range coming out of two speakers. I’m overjoyed with what I’m hearing. I can’t believe this is finally a reality.
    14 points
  2. Here's a shot of my pinstriped interconnects. Speaker wires are done as well. That way I can easily tell L (black), R (red), HF (green), and LF (blue).
    6 points
  3. 5 points
  4. Took an artsy night shot.
    5 points
  5. This morning I finally took the time to rearrange my Heresy speakers: I put them on the floor, tilted with diy risers I bought in a diy store. (before, they were placed higher with the tweeters at ear height) I had never thought they would sound so different! The high and low frequencies are much better balanced. Thank you to those who nudged me to do this. It was a small effort, quick, and cost no money at all!
    4 points
  6. That's an acoustic blanket covering the fireplace that I never use to approximate a smooth front wall.
    4 points
  7. Well…..mark was wrong. Al5 belongs to the new la scala because of the celestion tweeter. The AK6 belongs to the new khorn because of the new celestion tweeter.
    4 points
  8. I forgot to update my profile picture yesterday. Out with the Palladium and in with the Jubilee. (Both commissioned with https://www.instagram.com/p.laz.tattoo/.)
    3 points
  9. SPECIFICATIONS FREQUENCY RESPONSE (+1.75 dB/- 3 dB) 18Hz – 20kHz SENSITIVITY1 Avg. Sensitivity of HF - 110dB Avg. Sensitivity of LF - 107dB POWER HANDLING (CONT/PEAK) LF - 300W / 1200W HF - 100W / 400W MAXIMUM SPL 125 dB/1m (Using DSP) NOMINAL IMPEDANCE LF - 8 ohms, minimum 3.5 ohms at 160Hz HF - 16 ohms, miminum 7.6 ohms at 4.3kHz CROSSOVER FREQUENCY 340 Hz HIGH FREQUENCY DRIVER K-693 7” Titanium Diaphragm Compression Driver with 5” Voice Coil LOW FREQUENCY DRIVER Dual K-283 12” Fiber-Composite cone woofers ENCLOSURE MATERIAL MDF INPUTS 5 way binding post HEIGHT 69.5” (175.26 cm) WIDTH 50.25” (127 cm) DEPTH 30.25” (76.2 cm) WEIGHT LF - 330 lbs (149.68 kg) HF - 78 lbs (35.38 kg) FINISH Black Ash, American Walnut GRILLE Salt and Pepper Cloth
    3 points
  10. Yes, just off to the left in the bay window area.
    3 points
  11. I am truly happy for you... I can hear it in your writings, the excitement is intoxicating.
    3 points
  12. Yes it does. The k771
    3 points
  13. I don't think it's overkill. The ideal front stage would be three identical speakers. The only reason we have smaller horizontal center speakers is because most people don't have the space to accommodate three identical speakers up front. They are not made that way because that is the ideal design. MTM speakers (or variants of that) oriented horizontally are a compromise for space. Also, I have to disagree with the statement that "timbre matching is overrated". This will depend on your sensitivity to mismatches and how much it bothers you. I can't stand mismatches across the front stage. I find it constantly distracting when the sound changes as sound effects pans happen across the front. Also, it not just "timbre" that can be mismatched. Differences in the levels of distortion can also be distracting. For example, I could never live with a RP center with Heritage mains. In the Klipsch consumer lines of speakers, most of the 2-way speakers like Reference and RP hand off from horns to cones in the range of 1200 Hz to as high as 2500 Hz. In contrast, the consumer line 3-way speakers (that are not fully horn-loaded) like Heritage or 3-way Legend series transition from horns to cones in a range of like 500 Hz to 850 Hz. This means that the consumer 3-way and fully horn-loaded speakers (whether 3-way or 2-way like the Jubilee) will have less distortion in the critical lower and middle region of the mid-range frequencies where the bulk of the musical and vocal action is. The fully horn-loaded speakers will also have much lower distortion in their bass operating range. These differences in the distortion levels are plainly audible to me. That's why I recommended the largest Heritage speaker you could accommodate as a center. While the Cornwall, Hersey, or Forte will never have the low bass distortion levels of a La Scala or Belle, their timbre and distortion profile will be a closer match than RP. You have to figure out if you are one of those people who are bothered by mismatches or aren't. I found this out the hard way when I was buying my first center speaker to go with my Forte mains in the 90's. At first, I tried going as inexpensive as I thought I could reasonably go and purchased a KG 2.2V. This speaker was totally inadequate to match the Fortes. It sounded nothing like them and could not “keep up” due to much lower sensitivity/max output. So, I traded that in for an Academy. I did not find it to be a sonic match for the Fortes either (despite Klipsch marketing it as such). It was a much better center than the KG 2.2V but still didn’t work for me. It sounded more like a match for the original kg series, not the Forte family. From the moment I started using it, I was aware of the sound character change in the center as sounds panned across the front. It was very disconcerting and was a constant distraction. Soon after I got the Academy I went back to the dealer and made a deal to trade it in for a single Heresy II. The 3-way design was a much better match for the 3-way Fortes. I was very happy with that decision, but I lost money on each trade in to learn this lesson.
    3 points
  14. my '75 heresys are sitting flat on the floor on the ~2" non-tilted factory risers from that period. i tried tilting them back, but quickly put them back. i found tilted back a bit too much "in your face". sounds best like this to me (see below). current positioning is more toed in than this, crossing a couple of feet in front of the sitting position.
    2 points
  15. Depends on how much and how far. As far as good, Klipsch did not make bad speakers @RocketFoot... thanks.
    2 points
  16. you have the last pair of UJ ..you should have the latest drivers , so , no need to change anything .
    2 points
  17. I retired in February 2020, just in time for a global pandemic to kick into high gear. Great timing. 😁
    2 points
  18. It’s a multi-purpose system, mainly music which is 2.1, La Scalas, with a Table Tuba Subwoofer; Movies, TV & Gaming is 5.1.2 with the La Scalas, three Heresys, the TT Sub, and RB-61iis for presence/height speakers. Currently the Yamaha RXA-1070 is running the Heresys and RB61IIs. I honestly had no idea that Carver still existed.
    2 points
  19. Yes, they used a 1/4 inch gasket (may have actually been 2 thiner gaskets stacked on each other)
    2 points
  20. Congratulations, I don't think I would be able to go back to work until I've gone through my complete music collection and then some.
    2 points
  21. Outstanding!!! I did get a kick out of the first picture. Almost looks like a picture of your daughters playhouse with toy speakers in it (the way they fill the room). It's easy to see how someone might say/think they're too big for the room......until you hear them.
    2 points
  22. Almost 4 billion views
    2 points
  23. Whatever you do, don't skimp on your center. In a home theater environment, nothing is overkill in regard to a center speaker. I tried several different traditional center speakers and wasn't 100% happy until I added another Heresy to match my mains. I would absolutely go without a center (which I did for a long time until I found a 3rd Heresy) than put something in the mix that was massively outperformed by your LaScalas.
    2 points
  24. Yes they are almost unnoticeable. NOT!
    2 points
  25. Enjoy, Enjoy, Enjoy !!!! There is always a funny grin that we get when listening to astounding speakers. No, you can't wipe it off. You will have to live with it. Congratulations
    2 points
  26. The speakers or movers? 😁
    2 points
  27. Simply WOW! I'm happy for you and think that... the more I see them in real rooms, the nicer they look. Congratulations!
    2 points
  28. The Jubilee are in and setup. I started a new thread: .
    2 points
  29. 2 points
  30. Bob can call them whatever but the al5 in the current la scala and AK6 in the current khorn are current. I also got confused myself so I intentionally wanted the updated speakers to carry the network name. La scala al5. Klipschorn ak6
    2 points
  31. 2 points
  32. @JohnJ I have that song on the 2 LP of the Steve Wilson mix https://www.discogs.com/release/14338110-King-Crimson-In-The-Court-Of-The-Crimson-King-An-Observation-By-King-Crimson
    2 points
  33. 2 points
  34. Here is the dude, Benjamin Clementine.
    1 point
  35. @MMurg, Your new speakers are just the right size! ☺️
    1 point
  36. Haven’t seen it yet But I can’t remember the first Dune movie either 🤪
    1 point
  37. Not anymore...Rolling Rock sold out to Anheuser-Busch and is brewed in several different cities other than Latrobe, PA! The brewery is still here but it is City Brewing Co. now...they brew Twisted Tea and Truly Hard Seltzer water.
    1 point
  38. 1 point
  39. Welcome to my SH 2.0 "Victim" club! Stick with 4 uF for the mid and 2 uF for the tweet and you should be good to go. The woofer you bought is the best I have found for the SH. It and DaveA's tweeter really make those boxes sing. Yes I agree about the imaging. Super Heresy is one of the most phase coherent speakers you can create. Plus that Neo driver has more bass output than the K-42 and the Eminence Delta Pro 12A, so you got the best of the best.
    1 point
  40. It is crazy that it has taken me so long to finally get these built and installed in my room! I started cutting wood for this over 7 years ago... finally completed over a year ago only to sit in the garage. A couple of fellow audio nuts helped me carry these upstairs and also move the La Scalas out to the garage for new veneer or Duratex. WHY did I wait so long?! This sounds awesome! Smoothed out the bass and seems to add another octave down. It is so much smoother and clearer on the bottom end! I thought the dispersion would be a bit narrow having these up on end like this. The smallest adjustment of toe-in seemed to have a big effect. Quite a bit of listening and adjusting and all of a sudden they just lit up the room! It was actually that dramatic. It nailed it not only for the sweet spot (what I mainly care about) but most of the room. There was a bit of "chesty" resonance maybe around the lower registers of the male voice. It was suggested to drop a pillow at the end of the horn and that resonance was gone. I added some NoRez padding from GR Research... it helped a little but not nearly as much so I put the pillows back. The family wants the pillows back on the couch but I don't think that will happen too soon. The mid horn and tweeter assembly is sitting on a brace/shelf that is the exact height of where they were sitting on top of the La Scalas with a slight tilt down. Yeah, I'm pretty happy! Oh and for all the help I owe thanks to @paul79, his friend Jered, and certainly @ClaudeJ1!
    1 point
  41. 1 point
  42. I live in an apartment and sometimes don’t hear someone knocking on the door, especially if they knock softly and I have music playing. The simple solution was to buy a wireless doorbell. It’s in two parts: the transmitter and the receiver. The transmitter is a little white plastic box with the doorbell button on it that you attach to your door, or somewhere very close, so that everybody will notice it. It has a little battery in it that lasts for years. The receiver is a larger white plastic box that you plug into any convenient AC socket, near the door or near where you spend most of your time. When the doorbell button is pressed, you hear a two-tone doorbell sound from the receiver/doorbell unit. It’s that simple. I got it from Home Depot years ago, and it’s been working just fine ever since. Some people still knock instead of ringing, but it would be easy to put a little card saying RING near the button.
    1 point
  43. Don't make the mistake of tying yourself too tightly to a fixed top price. Get the speakers you actually want and will be happy with. If they don't fit your budget this month, put aside some money every month until you do have the money. You want to do justice to your fine receiver, don't you? For years, every month I've been putting aside $100, sometimes $200, into my Audio Buying account. It adds up surprisingly quickly. Then, when I spot a bargain I've been hoping to find, I have the cash to dash and grab it or them. Believe it or not, the least expensive way to get a good stereo, one you're really happy with, is to buy the stuff you want the first time, instead of buying something entry-level, then mid-level, then better mid-level, and maybe someday real hi-fi. Buying gear you're not really satisfied with, and then replacing it with the next step up, and the next step up, really adds up in price. Meanwhile, years have gone by, and the thing you wanted in the first place is now quite a bit more expensive than it was when you started. Also, if spending money on audio gear can cause an argument, the fewer arguments, the better, right? As for your lovely wifey, when she hears her favourite tune through a good system, she'll be sold. A few dollars here or there aren't really important in the long run. Quality is remembered long after price is forgotten. What would I do in your place? I'd be searching US Audio Mart and maybe eBay, or Kijiji, for a pair of Heresy II, or even better, Heresy III speakers. They'll be used, because the current model is the Heresy IV, but Klipsch speakers, especially Heritage Series models, tend to be well-treated, so they may look like new. 5.25" woofers? Heresys have 12" woofers! They are floor-standing models, but they're pretty short and are best described as largish bookshelf speakers. And they're made right in Hope, Arkansas, not overseas. Right now, I have a Heresy III speaker on a stand in my system performing Rear Surround duties in a 6.2 system. The only reason I sold my Heresy IIs is because I replaced them with La Scalas. The guy who bought them was delighted. Of course, don't forget the Garage Sale section here on the Forum, as well as the Alerts sub-section. You never know what you'll see. That's where I found my La Scala IIs, and it was well worth the short drive and long ferry ride to get them. I should point out that Heritage speakers have that name for two reasons. First, they were designed by Paul Klipsch himself, which is great. Second, their quality and longevity is such that your children may be listening to them after you're gone. The woofers are not like the common foam-surrounded models that need their surrounds replaced every 15-20 years. Klipsch Heritage woofers use doped-paper surrounds that last indefinitely. My oldest speakers are a pair of 1974 La Scalas. As far as I know, the woofers are original, and they sound just fine. EDIT: I just checked US Audio Mart and got a slap of reality in the face. Heresys have gone up in price quite a bit, used or not. $1,000 may be a hard sell to the wife for used speakers. However, that's this month. Who knows what will show up next month, while your Audio Account continues to grow? It's funny how it works. Heritage speakers depreciate for a few years, then they don't. When I bought my first La Scalas, they were 32 years old, and I paid approximately what they had cost when they were new, back in 1974. The Heresy IIs? After owning them for 13 years, I sold them for a bit more than I had paid for them, which worked out to be a bargain price for the buyer, who as I mentioned was well pleased with them. So there's my advice. Good luck on your quest for great sound!
    1 point
  44. Yea. But that won’t stop Claude from bellowing.
    1 point
  45. If you are using the 335 and 325 networks, those are meant to have an exaggerated mid because they go behind a screen in a cinema. the 396 networks are essentially flat but do allow for an exaggerated low end when played on the floor. Typically 396’s are flown and don’t have much of a plane to load the bass. just thought I’d give you a little more insight on how the networks are designed for these particular speakers.
    1 point
  46. Well Claude. Believe it or not…..I’m not on here to impress you. It’s my time to waste and if I want to be lazy then I will be. I bet…..some people don’t have the same trouble believing that this might only be bs to you and might…..just might have lowered their eyes just enough to find this somewhat “educational”.
    1 point
  47. I'd have to spend a couple hundred thousand on a house to fit them first. However if I could...
    1 point
×
×
  • Create New...