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Islander

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Everything posted by Islander

  1. Home Depot sells crates like that for $8.50 in black. While the milk crates are just the right size to store LPs, over the years the plastic dries out and cracks. Plastic isn't the "forever material" that we used to think it was. Resin is even worse. I got a white resin patio furniture type bench, and after a few years you could snap parts off it easily, just using your fingers. Good thing it was only $5 from HD. As for more traditional materials, you can get various kinds of wooden boxes now, but they're nowhere as heavy duty as the old Coca-Cola boxes. Some of them are just stapled together, not even nailed. I bought one of these new wooden LP boxes (nailed together) made of "salvaged" wood. More like scrap wood, with knots and holes in it. Even so, it looked better than plastic for the living room, and as well as holding LPs, it makes an ideal perch for the right subwoofer, matching the left sub, which is on a low table. Having the subs about a foot above the floor, on thick neoprene pads, should reduce any floor bounce muddying the sound, plus it should prevent or greatly reduce any thudding bass notes going down through the floor to the neighbours below. Sometimes I listen to music at really late hours, so it's a consideration. The floor is thick concrete, but even so...
  2. OOOOH! AAAAAAHH! Imagine the extra shielding needed to keep the signal isolated from the lighting in the cable itself...
  3. 11 feet? Aww. I need 15 feet. Anyway, Paul's Infinity IRS V speakers are worth something over $70,000, and even after that he had to rebuild them, and supply new amplifiers for the bass section. Once you've spent that much and more on a pair of speakers (that are actually four 7 or 8 feet tall towers, two bass and two treble), maybe crazy-priced cable starts to make sense. Speaking of AudioQuest speaker cables, what do you or anyone think of their 72V "Dialectric Bias Current" feature?
  4. Islander

    .

    That's been clarified already.
  5. Islander

    .

    The OP did say full range speaker, referring to the whole speaker system, not full range driver, a single component. Big difference. Could it be that the terms in German are more similar to each other? Besides, it's better not to comment about something a member is selling.
  6. You do know that Layla is a love song to George Harrison's wife Patty Boyd, don't you? George wasn't too impressed.
  7. I just got The Apollo Murders by Chris Hadfield, the Canadian astronaut. I’m looking forward to reading it, even more because my daughter gave me the hardcover version. I’ve come to really prefer reading hardcover books, since it gives a more luxurious reading experience, and the books will often sit open when you set them down. Chris spent months on the ISS and was the mission chief in Houston, so I’m sure he’ll get every technical detail right. Now to find out if he can imagine and write a great action thriller!
  8. Islander

    Jokes?

    No, I wasn’t suggesting or implying anything, just adding a bit of context to the creation of that avatar image. And I liked your humorous comment. The older I get, the more long-winded I seem to become. I’m trying to cut down, and sometimes I actually do.
  9. Islander

    Jokes?

    Thanks! Me too. I’m pleased with that shot. It gives a good idea of the size of the K402 horns.
  10. Islander

    Jokes?

    Exactly. A married woman soon remembers that she didn’t go through all that to sleep alone.
  11. Islander

    Jokes?

    Either that or the software. Or me. I was really sleepy when I was typing that. I spent around 12 years working midnights and afternoons, and I don’t think my sleeping schedule has been right ever since, more than 25 years later. On the first midnight shift of my last job, back in 1993, I was standing behind the guy who was instructing me, when I fell asleep. Yes, you can fall asleep standing up. My knees collapsed, but I woke up in time to recover without hitting the floor, and he never noticed. In my experienced opinion, night shifts shouldn’t be more than six hours long, and no-one should be forced to work them. I never volunteered for a night shift. Night and afternoon shifts (the back shifts, as they were called on the railroad) should have large enough shift premiums (the extra pay for working those shifts) that everyone working them is happy to be there and has made sure to be fully rested. Who would want to work midnight shift? A man whose wife has a good day job, in which case it makes sense to have him at home during the day to mind the kids, for example. On the downside, one of the lesser-known hazards of night shift is ruined marriages, causing divorces. One reason women get married is to have someone to keep them warm at night. Take that away, and they may start to wonder why they bothered. I’ll stop now, before I start to grind my teeth at the memory of it.
  12. Islander

    Jokes?

    unexpected triple post.
  13. Islander

    Jokes?

    unexpected double post...
  14. Islander

    Jokes?

    Real life humour: When you're working midnight shift and the supervisor offers you a coffee, and you reply, "No thanks, coffee keeps me awake." Guaranteed annoyed/unhappy look from the supervisor. That's what happened when I said that to him.
  15. You could place a thermometer near the speakers, or the speaker nearest the vent, and see how hot they get. You should probably find a way to support the thermometer at least an inch above the desk, allowing the air to go above and below the thermometer. This is to ensure that you're measuring the temperature of the air and not the temperature of the desk. If it stays below 90F/32C, your speakers should be safe. If the temperature of the area turns out to be too high for the continued health of your speakers, and you'd prefer not to move them, you could fit an air deflector to the hot air vent, which will direct the warm breeze off in a safe direction. You can get them at hardware stores. They're usually made of clear plastic and are not very expensive.
  16. And to all the other bums too, I hope!
  17. Very cool story! Anyone in this forum would love to have that memory. Thanks for sharing your story, and welcome to the Forum!
  18. Depending on the size and layout of your room, having a sub in the back of the room, possibly as well as having one on the front of the room, can run into an unexpected issue. My Yamaha AVR has two Subwoofer sockets, marked Front and Rear. Therefore, when I got the second sub, it seemed logical to place it at the back of the room. In order to avoid having its output going into the back of the sofa, I placed it on a barstool-height chair. Makes total sense, right? Not quite. I noticed the rear sub would be late to turn on after it sensed bass content. When I checked, I found that after the front sub turned on, I had to increase the main volume by 6 dB to get the rear sub to turn on. The ~50-foot-long Audioquest Black Lab interconnect ($170CAD) to the rear sub measured 1 ohm of resistance, while the 6 foot/2 metre Electrohome interconnect measured 0.5 ohm. This was enough to create this noticeable difference. At the lower volume levels that I mostly listen at, the rear sub would be turning on and off as the bass content of the music varied, while the front sub would switch on and stay on. With subwoofers, it can be hard to judge tonal differences between two of them, especially to a non-musician (my father, who played upright bass many years ago, told me that with the bass, most people have no clue as to whether or not he’s playing in tune. He would be in tune, of course, he was just pointing out that at low frequencies the human ear/brain system is operating below the range at which small differences are obvious to most listeners.). So the arrangement might have been great or so-so, but it seemed okay to me. However, I was pretty dubious at that point, so I relocated the second/rear sub to a position inboard of the Right Main speaker (the left sub is just inboard of the Left Main speaker) and used an old 6-foot/2 metre stereo interconnect, leaving the unused ends hanging. Both Sub Outs are mono, not stereo, on that AVR, so that was a non-issue. The result: great sound, a bit of a wall of sound effect (not in caps, because it wasn’t the Phil Spector effect), and both subs turn on and off at the same time. The system seems pretty synergistic at this point, as indicated by the fact that for the first time in seventeen years, I have spent a calendar year (2021) without spending anything on the stereo. Its performance has reached a plateau of enjoyment that allows me to listen without any thoughts of possible/needed upgrades/tweaks creeping into my mind, so now it’s all about the music, as it always should have been. Okay, that was a lot longer than necessary, but it gives a bit of added context, so I have no regrets. To the OP, good luck on your quest for satisfying sound!
  19. Islander

    USED POLICE CARS

    I drove a 1983 Ontario Provincial Police (OPP) Impala 5.7 litre for 8 years, after buying it in 1985. Then I got a 1990 OPP Caprice in 1993, and drove it happily for 3 years, until I got injured and had to switch to a minivan. I was in the process of shopping for a 1992 or 1993 police Caprice at the time, because the body on the 1990 was a bit rusty. The OPP sells off their patrol cars when they hit 130-140,000 km (about 85-90,000 miles), but they accumulate that mileage in just 2-3 years. I was putting as much as I could into paying down my mortgage, so the idea of getting a 2-3 year old performance car for around $3,000 seemed like a great idea. The rear end on the Impala failed at around 250,000 km, but I was able to buy a used Cadillac rear end and get it installed for around $900 IIRC. The downside was that I had to go to 17 wrecking yards to find it, since many taxi companies bought those cars and put extreme numbers of miles on them, therefore needing differentials for many of their cars. The Caprice had apparently been used for towing a heavy boat on dirt roads, and its diff. was shot. I had a shop swap in the rear end from the Impala and away I went, while the Impala went to the wreckers. Due to having a defective rear end, the 3-year-old Caprice cost me only $2500 to buy, so I didn’t mind the added cost of the rear end swap and the towing to the shop from the auction yard. In daily operation, the parts are dirt cheap relative to a Japanese or German car. “White box” brake pads cost only $17, while the much smaller pads for the girlfriend’s Nissan 200SX cost $240. The Caprice’s oil looked like mud, which concerned me, but after an oil change and oil and air filter replacement, the oil stayed clean and the throttle body injected 5.7 ran great. Those 5.7 Chevy engines are really good and they evolved over the years, making more power and using less fuel and oil over the decades. That car had great handling, and would land evenly on all four wheels, which was great. And when you get pulled over, the cops tend to be a little friendly when they see what you’re driving. Sadly, those big B-body Chevys are no longer being produced. One other thing: the transmission on the Impala failed on the highway on one Christmas Day, which was inconvenient. That component should be carefully checked, as they may have been abused. The minivan didn’t fare so well. After being spoiled by the heavy duty cop cars, the minivan ended up with bent front suspension, broken rear suspension, and a broken driver’s seat mounting in the first 3 years. I moved West and drove it for another 13 years. Now I have a 2012 Grand Caravan R/T, with the big 330 mm (13”) HD brake discs, which are miles better than the long-suffering 282 mm (11”) brakes on the 1998 Grand Caravan. Those discs were undersized for the weight of the minivan, and would get heat checked and even cracked, while eating pads every 45,000 km (28.000 miles). Nothing has failed on the newer van, so I expect to drive it happily for a long time. It also has the R/T-only performance suspension, so it corners pretty flat. Flat for a minivan, that is, but much better than the old van. As for the Fords, the Town Cars seem to be the best bet, often reaching the million-mile mark in limousine service, something no other Ford model manages. Almost forgot: the space between the front bucket seats where the computer used to go makes it easy to hop in the back seat with your girlfriend at the drive-in. There were still some drive-in movie theatres left in 1993.
  20. Islander

    USED POLICE CARS

    Also look for stashes hidden in the washrooms at the courthouse, lol.
  21. You’re right, La Scalas do need the help of a sub or two. I’m using a pair of Paradigm Seismic 110s with my 402 JubScala IIs (2-way bi-amped La Scala IIs with the large K402 Jubilee tweeter horn). I had a single 400-watt 10” sub, which sounded good, but the current setup, with two 850-watt 10” subs, is much better. 2021 is the first year in 16 years that I haven’t felt the need to spend anything on the system. As far as I know, the AL-3 is a pretty good crossover, but I’m sure you’ll get lots of advice, since crossovers are a popular subject for discussion here. Actually, if your speakers are fine maybe an amplifier upgrade is a better place to put your money. The better the signal, the better the sound. I went from a midrange DVD player to a top-of-the-line Panasonic Blu-ray, and CDs sound much better now, just for one example.
  22. Seeing this fine speaker makes me wonder why Klipsch went from oiled walnut to lacquered walnut. Oiling the finish every year or so was not that onerous, and the finish seemed much less delicate than that on the more modern speakers.
  23. Is it totally necessary that you sit close to the back wall? The best listening position is often described as one-third of the way into the room, which gets you further away from the strong reflected sound coming off the back wall and blurring the sound. My living room is 18’ x 19’, with only half a wall on one side. The sofa is about 6 feet from the rear wall, which leaves enough room for 3 surround speakers (Left Surround, Centre Rear, and Right Surround) behind the sofa, for a 6.2 system when I’m not listening to 2-channel music. It works out well sonically, and the TV is still 12 feet away, so there’s still some useful space in the room. If you arrange your seating so that your speakers are not so far away, you’ll need less power and get a wider apparent (wider angle) sound stage, plus you may find that you can hear more low-level details in the music, even at lower volume levels. There is one seating position to be avoided. That’s in the middle of the room, where you can often find a big bass dip, no matter what kind of subwoofer you may be using, but few rooms are shaped to make sitting right in the middle a logical choice.
  24. What are you looking for that the current Yamaha receivers don’t have? Have you checked out the new series with one big knob on the front? My receiver is powering the surround left and right speakers, plus centre front and rear, while the MX-D1s are powering the main left and right speakers. The RX-A2060 receiver is a 2016 model, and it has everything/does everything I need. It even has a speed-sensitive volume knob. If you roll up the volume slowly, a single twist of the wrist will increase the volume in small increments, for a total of maybe 10 dB, while a quick twist of the wrist will raise or lower the volume by as much as 30 dB. It’s kind of cool.
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