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philipbarrett

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Everything posted by philipbarrett

  1. I really wanted the IIIs & there isn't much of a selection on the used market so I had to send money to Hope!
  2. Put down my money on a pair of Walnut Cornwall IIIs. It was a tough decision between them & the LS-II, but the extended LF won out in the end. Can't remember the last time I bought a pair of new, new speakers!
  3. I'm looking at the Radial - http://www.radialeng.com/r2011/j33.php I've use their other products extensively and they'd been of first rate quality. Plus the price is nice (>$200).
  4. The date codes breaks down as follows for serial number 350398581: 350 = 350th day of the year or December 17 39 = year reversed or 1993 So, 12/17/93 is the day they rolled off the floor in Hope.
  5. The date codes breaks down as follows for serial number 350398581: 350 = 350th day of the year or December 17 39 = year reversed or 1993 So, 12/17/93 is the day they rolled off the floor in Hope.
  6. I wouldn't cry. Manley throw away a lot of tubes and only sell those that have passed their verification tests.
  7. Yes we found that out the hard way too. Left K-Horn swam deeper than the right. Thank goodness for teens watching movies all night or we'd have been re-doing the entire house.
  8. Thought you were going to take them. I'd love them to go to a good home as I have some sentimental attachment to them.
  9. As hinted in another thread, my beloved Klipschorns are now up for sale. They are light oak and in overall excellent acoustic and physical condition, I'm moving to a house where there are just no suitable corners in which to place them and will be ordering more Klipsch products after these are sold. Truth in advertising: we had a small flood at Christmas and for about 20 minutes these stood in about 2" of water. Following this they were subjected to a thorough drying process by a remediation company (Serv-Pro). The only visible damage is a de-lamination of the very ends of the footer strips as I show in the photographs below. After the flood I fully tested the units with Spectra-Foo using both pink noise and sweeps and could detect no sonic problems, rubbing or damage. I just want the prospective buyer to be fully informed. The only other problem is a small chip on the front, top right of one of the cabinets, this is also pictured below. Price is $2,000.00 OBO. I will assist in shipping provided buyer makes all arrangements. PM or email me. \ http://i105.photobucket.com/albums/m219/philipbarrett/Klipschorn/file_zps74706459.jpg
  10. Great essay, especially the gain part. A certain manufacturer in the pro sphere makes all kinds of claims about the low noise of their mixers. The reason they're low noise is because they have no gain and to properly drive a system you need to add gain to their outputs thereby increasing the noise! As I once remarked, I have coat hangers in my closet with a low noise floor I can sell you.
  11. Great essay, especially the gain part. A certain manufacturer in the pro sphere makes all kinds of claims about the low noise of their mixers. The reason they're low noise is because they have no gain and to properly drive a system you need to add gain to their outputs thereby increasing the noise! As I once remarked, I have coat hangers in my closet with a low noise floor I can sell you.
  12. Manley has a tube collection almost in the millions I believe.
  13. ...and I just noticed a B-77 in the background. How cool is that?
  14. She used to drive a classic Lancia Fulvia with the Rome plates still attached. Gave the CHiPs a heart attack every time they saw it! If you enjoyed the HiFi section, mosey on over to the Pro pages and check out their scam stories. They'll crack you up. They have an ebay account called "Fake Manley Do Not Bid" which they use to bid on all the scammer's ads out there. In all seriousness, there's plenty of suckers in the hifi world ready to shell out big $ for dubious equipment but the people who do this day in, day out for a living aren't as easily convinced. The pretenders might shell out a grand or so for some crap they think is cool but if you can stay in business selling $6,000+ eq units you're obviously doing a lot of stuff right. That market doesn't part with it's cash lightly. Congrats on the purchase, you have a serious piece of kit which will outlive all of us. I'm seriously considering dropping some money into Eve's g-string myself but just hanging on to see what Bruce Rozenblit is going to do with his 300B OTL before deciding.
  15. Actually different artist, but thanks. Miguel's album was recorded live with close spaced Neuman KM-84s on his guitars. The ambient mics were probably AKG-414s but don't hold me to that. It was recorded direct to digital and I did some final post eq via a Midas XL-42 analog parametric equalizer but the final product is no more than 3 generations form the original.
  16. To some ears yes. It depends on the product too. I worked with a tremendously talented, extremely tortured acoustic player (similar style to Leo Kotke). He liked the attack on his Martin to literally smack you in the face. Therefore I used close micing with small capsule condensors and a Mitsubishi digital recorder to capture his sound. He decided that we needed a break from each other and hired another engineer. Within a week he was calling me again. I asked him what went wrong and he told me the other guy had shown up with a wonderful (and valuable) collection of vintage tube mics and preamplifiers. "He just made me sound like s**t" was the comment from the artist!
  17. Very common procedure. There's a natural compression achieved by pushing analog tape hard which gives a nice punch to drums and is difficult to replicate in other ways. A favorite is to use a 16 track 2" machine which gives a wider path than 24 track.
  18. Yes! Flat is not a good thing. Even given all the tools to make it so live, we never do. Listening to a pair of Meyer HD-1s if you can. Probably the flattest frequency and phase response of any monitor out there. You'll be amazed at the detail you can hear and horrified that it sounds so uninteresting.
  19. Always been a problem with analog tape in the studio. Imagine that master going back and forth thousands of times, particularly when "punching in" vocals and other overdubs. The cause is both oxide shedding and the residual current in the 3 heads (erase, record, playback) slowly wiping the masters. One solution applied on lengthy album projects is to mix 48 track using two 24 track machines locked together. You do a submix of your basic tracks onto a 2nd tape and then do the extensive overdubbing only on that reel (in the case of one album I remember ending up with 4 reels that had to be submixed to 2 reels!). Once mix time comes, you lock the original master to the overdub master and enjoy pristine tracks. Rumors is the subject of a book "Making Rumors" by Ken Callet. For another real glimpse inside the control room I suggest Ken Scott's "Abbey Road to Ziggy Stardust." His narrative traces the evolution of record making from the early days of multitrack through to the rock odysseys of the 70s.
  20. Let's clear the decks here as we seem to be following each other down the digital vs. analog rabbit hole which was not the point of this thread. I have nothing against digital audio systems per se. I use them daily and could not begin to imagine life without them. However, all digital is not created equal and we cannot make blanket statements that accurately describe all the various formats, types and qualities. Likewise with analog. Another sweeping term and again we need to be sure we're comparing apples to apples. A good turntable and signal chain is capable of stunning results and an old changer is not. In the end of the day, it's what you prefer. There is no "bad" gear or "good" gear. There is gear better suited to certain environments and listening conditions. There is gear that appeals to certain tastes and musical preferences. Nobody is wrong and everybody is right. A friend loves hearing background music throughout her house, her Bose Lifestyle set up is absolutely perfect for her. My father listens exclusively to classical music with a penchant for early 20th century recordings. A set of Spendors and Quad amplification is the perfect pairing. And so it goes on... I call it the Tao of Audio and sometimes I wish everyday life was this simple.
  21. The man whose name is on the masthead would have a word (or is it 2 words) for that. :-) Digital error correction makes an assumption of the data that is missed based on the pre and post bitstream. There is no actual restoration, it's a best guess. And like all guesses, its' accuracy is affected by a number of external factors including the amount of data missing and the quality of the system replacing that data. "Perfectly" would imply that 100% of the missing data is replaced by identical 1 and 0's. This can never be the case.
  22. The physics would agree with you. And in the case of discs sounding better, I believe the repeated playing is removing dirt and also manufacturing debris allowing better tracking of the signal. However, back to our original discourse. As with the mechanical interface problems of vinyl, CDs also suffer from the same ailments manifesting themselves in different ways. And as you said, test equipment will verify increasing levels of error correction being induced as players age and discs pickup microscopic pieces of dirt.
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