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DirtyErnie

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About DirtyErnie

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Twin Cities, MN
  • My System
    In flux... KG 2.5's (titanium tweeters, rebuilt x-overs) standing by to be replaced by re-built Epic CF-2.
    Powered by a Sony receiver, it's just easier to deal with than the '61 H.H. Scott 222C, sadly.

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  1. Try it all, parallel, crossed behind you, at your head, in front... That's the fun with this hobby; small changes may have big effects. CF2's in my house have a 'head in a vice' tiny sweet spot when they're parallel/straight ahead. I have mine toed-in so they cover almost the whole sofa area and am finding the sound to be very even everywhere.
  2. Looking to upgrade the home theater system, the goal is to multi-amp the speakers. To do that, I'll need some sort of HDMI a/v preamp to hook up the Blue Ray & tv. Anyone have a recommendation on something fairly affordable? Probably going to have to be used, and as I upgrade the TV to something 4K, I'm willing to get an outboard box to handle that much data, so standard 1080 HD limit may be just fine. Thanks!
  3. On my KG 2.5's I did a one-step-at-a-time, one speaker at a time thing when I rebuilt the crossovers. Step 1 on speaker A, Steps 1 & 2 on speaker B, et.c. Wanted to hear the improvements on each step. Swapped out the NPE's for Erse Pulse X. Both speakers sounded kinda midrange-hashy before. This definitely tightened up the frequency response and improved clarity by a LOT. suddenly, all the treble was available and very clear out of the updated crossover. Added Crite's white caps (can't remember which offhand), series caps for the tweeter. Cleaned up the treble by quite a bit. Crite's titanium tweeters: definitely smoother and more extended than the stock phenolic. Everybody who says that swapping crossover caps makes no difference either had really good stuff to begin with or has never done this kind of direct comparison. It was NOT subtle on these. On my CF2's, I've had one crossover re-built for a while and haven't done the second yet. The difference on these is a lot more subtle, but still better with the updated crossover (however, I'm using some oddball non-standard audio stuff.)
  4. Mid 30's Hz is pretty deep bass for a full-range speaker cabinet. But, you're looking at a ported cabinet 24db/octave roll-off below the lowest impedance dip. On the blue trace, that would put 20Hz at somewhere around 20dB down from the port tuning. 'Minimum useful' frequency is (from what I've ever seen) about -10dB, probably in the neighborhood of 25Hz. The 12" JBL sub I have only goes down to about 25Hz, so I'm getting along just fine without a sub until I get some sort of serious thing that doesn't roll off until below 20hz. bass sweep Ran this again, Definitely comes on good at 35Hz, and then a little shallow until almost 60Hz, but my room, my mess, my problem.
  5. Just 'cuz I could, same graphs on a logarithmic scale, 'cuz octaves and stuff.
  6. I really can't tell much of a difference in just casual listening, but most of the stuff I'm listening to doesn't get down that deep anyways. The extensions are mostly an "ehhhh.... I made 'em, so they're staying in there" thing at this point. My bass test track is "Dare" by Gorillaz, and everything fails that 20Hz synth tone except for serious home theater subs. I don't yet have a serious home theater sub. Maybe the shorter ports would have a little less IM distortion from the 40-60hz signal, but I'm probably not ever playing loud enough to notice. Haven't done any REW type sweeps, since I'm not yet set up for it, but a multi-amp set-up is in the future plans.
  7. Took an hour and measured my CF2's, Serial #'s 2335970xx Low Frequencies: Blue line is the later-series port (shorter), red line is with a construction paper tube to extend that port to first-series length, ~5" if I remember. Pretty typical for a ported cabinet. Looks like the shorter port tunes at around 38Hz, longer port is around 32Hz. Impedance peaks shuffle around a bit, but the lower peak is always lower than the upper peak indicating they're maybe both tuned a bit 'low' for the drivers in the box. High Frequencies: Definitely seeing the effect of the Constant-Directivity crossover attenuating lower horn frequencies to give the horn a 'rising slope'. Surprised to see the impedance settle out to around 4 ohms at the top, considering the 8-ohm driver used, and the 8-ohm nominal impedance of the cabinet.
  8. Took an hour and measured my CF2's, Serial #'s 2335970xx Low Frequencies: Blue line is the later-series port (shorter), red line is with a construction paper tube to extend that port to first-series length, ~5" if I remember. Pretty typical for a ported cabinet. Looks like the shorter port tunes at around 38Hz, longer port is around 32Hz. Impedance peaks shuffle around a bit, but the lower peak is always lower than the upper peak indicating they're maybe both tuned a bit 'low' for the drivers in the box. High Frequencies: Definitely seeing the effect of the Constant-Directivity crossover attenuating lower horn frequencies to give the horn a 'rising slope'. Surprised to see the impedance settle out to around 4 ohms at the top, considering the 8-ohm driver used, and the 8-ohm nominal impedance of the cabinet.
  9. Yes. I was quite surprised what that small change to the wood did to the upper frequency response. Don't know what that does to the ability to sneak a 15" into the bottom of it, though.
  10. Go into HornResp and change that parallel section at the back of the LaScala mouth, move the front edge of it to line up with the back edge of the doghouse 'roof'.
  11. The Multiple-Entry Horn has been another thought on how to do it. My thoughts there involve a box with about the same width/height as above (~16"w, ~3' high), with a full-range upper section, similar to the images I posted, to direct higher frequencies at ear level, and the lower portion of the box being kind of a 'trench' with the same side profile as the upper MEH, but containing more low-frequency drivers to load the whole mouth area down to 100hz or so. Upper section would probably only load down to maybe 700hz. Haven't put a whole lot of time into fleshing out the math on that version. That will probably be the next steps, since it would likely be a LOT simpler to build. I'm not even worrying about crossovers, since DSP Multi-amping has become (relatively) very cheap and powerful. And, yeah, maybe 'peanut gallery' wasn't the right term, but sometimes I like to poke...
  12. Like many of us, I've always had a soft spot for horn speakers. Unfortunately, their size formats are usually less than friendly for a typical house, and especially the rather compact one I have. So, I took to re-imagining what a living-room friendly 100Hz horn could look like and came up with this. ~100- ~800hz, 8" driver on top, driving the full bandwidth 10" driver below, rolling off around 400hz (low enough to keep from effecting directivity due to height of the unit. High-frequency horn TBD, will sit on top just fine. 16"w, 24"d, 33.5"h Thoughts from the peanut gallery?
  13. 1. No. I'm not going to show you my bench, because 2. Looking at this thread, I"m realizing I need a LOT more of the little drawer cabinets. Nice work(benches), guys!
  14. I have a 5-valve CC Miraphone, but you're talking about a speaker. 😄
  15. Friend had a '58 Bassman with a pair of mercury vapor recs in it. Those things would light up brighter the more current you pulled through them. Was a super-fun lightshow on stage, especially when he was doing punchy rhythm stuff.
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