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Found 3 results

  1. Mostly mid 1970s Heresy I, IIs, LaScalas, Belle and Klipschorn maintenance, sealing, and placement questions Hello Folks: Mostly mid 1970s Heresy I, IIs, LaScalas, Belle and Klipschorn maintenance, sealing, and placement questions I have been reading many of the old, sometimes 20 year old posts. Many of the project and photo links no longer work . Moved into my new house. 1890s, hardwood floors 12-14 foot ceilings and 14 x27 ft main room plus 11 x 14 foot bedroom. Higher floor moldings than the K horn rear cutouts. General questions, some of which I am only asking due to the high cost and / or limited ability to get parts. Pre COVID, I would likely just do these. On all speakers, but do the big boys first: check all caps and replace the spam can caps on all of the larger speakers that were not previously replaced about 15 years ago, post Hurricane Katrina. Should I just contact Bob Crites? I will assume the crossovers, either original Klipsch or ALKs that I built when he sold the kits years ago are otherwise ok. I know I have a LaScala with a blown tweeter. Which replacement is suggested and will xover changes be required? I do have some baby butt JBL tweeters. Not sure if ok with the xovers. Should all cabinets be opened to check seals, gaskets and snug placement of woofers, mids, and tweeters? Re-gasket and reseal as needed – what do folks suggest for replacement gaskets / seals? Or: if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it? Should “O” rings between Alnico or KL drivers and various Klipsch horn components be replaced? If so, with what – just red rubber 25 cent plumber’s O rings? I have never opened any of the large speaker woofer panels / dog houses, etc. I have owned all speakers for about 15-34 years. FWIW I do have 1 set of wooden horn with 1 inch throats I think for the Khorns and a set of JBL radial horns of similar size (still looking for the drivers, lost in a box someplace). Old place had uneven stone floors and crumbly brick walls on 3 sides, plus roof leaks. 17 x 40 uniroom with high sloped ceiling (about 12-17 ft high) and good acoustics. New main room is much smaller, rectangular and without any carpeting or treatments is sonically very harsh. None of the 4 large outside windows work anymore – sealed shut long ago. No idea for the age or “firmness” of the existing plasterboard or drywall, but likely before the 1980s. I do not want to mess the place up making additional 4 x 4 ft 1 in thick plywood wall corners and triangle above the floor to brace things better. This would also likely require screwing the 4 x 4 s above the existing baseboards and floor. For sealing the khorns into a corner, the issue for me is that the baseboard is a few inches taller than the lower Khorn cutout. Should I make some cuts onto the Khorn or simply cut some strips of 1-2 inch wide x 1-2 inch thick pieces of wood and use foam pipe insulation or door seal around them and the rear of the Khorn to make a wall seal on the sides? Some great old posts with pics, like Garyd9 on 2 22 2004 (and many others): https://community.klipsch.com/index.php?/topic/37435-sealing-bass-bin-of-khorn/page/2/. Includes the wood corner braces too. I did not find a consensus on how to seal the top few inches or the bottom few inches in the center rear of the K horn woofer cabinet against the vertical wall corner. Suggestions? For sealing any of the large speakers to the floor (not the Heresy’s I guess) these seem to be representative posts: HDBRbuilder had several posts emphasizing the use of grippers, from Jan 7, 2009: Dr. Who: I would like to remind that if it is NOT grippers, then it may NOT have the same effect. Grippers are peel and stick 1/4" thick NEOPRENE with a traction enhancing non-stick side, which will "squish" somewhat under weight and give a better stability on SMOOTH-SURFACED floors which are slightly uneven. Groomlakearea51Posted March 14, 2007 Yup, pipe insulation works perfectly; You can also use 1/4 size (also comes with the "peel off" tape for the sticky edge). To seal to the floor.... I replaced the factory metal gliders (they will tear up a hardwood floor....) with teflon "gliders", but used more of them, including three "inboard" in the center; then used a piece of 3/16" thick x 3/4" wide closed cell foam weather stripping, but did not peel off the the "floor" side "sticky" cover. Slides around perfectly. Cheap to replace after several "move out for spring cleaning" moves that will tend to wear it off. I'm also debating about doing the same thing on the edges instead of pipe insulation next time around. Easier to trim and gets them very close to the wall. My humble Qs: since the 100+ pound LaScala, Belle, or Khorn is technically on small pieces of squished slightly pliable material, is it really “nailed” to the floor? I found some Scotch 8 gripping pads, 1.5 in diam at Home Depot for about $5.00, SP940-NA, 0-51141 59807-9 bar code. I also looked at some of the kitchen drawer liners at Walmart: https://www.walmart.com/search?q=drawer+liner. Could something like these do the trick? Mostly under $1 per foot. How easy or difficult is it to extract those small metal gliders from the factory? I can see doing this with the grippers and the LaScalas and Belle as 2 folks could move the speakers into place with only mildly destroyed finger tips and knuckles at worst. But why not just remove the metal gliders and place directly on the floor with maybe a few pieces of paper or cardboard or those floor sample freebies from Home Depot or Lowes stuffed under a corner to prevent any issues from uneven hardwood? Or even a few pieces of thin wood directly under the corners or fully under the outer floor edges of speakers and using foam or gasket to seal air around the corners and just leave the metal gliders in place? As for the Khorns, doing the grippers plus sealing the rear woofer cabinet to the wall corner will be a real problem so as not to mess up the floor and our hands. Since folks agree not to place the Khorns on a carpet (carpet plastic bottom to the KH bottom), I was thinking of using very thin wood strips above the floor, maybe ¼-½ in thick. For example, just cut to needed length: from Lowes: ReliaBilt 1/4-in x 2-in x 4-ft Square Unfinished Poplar Board Model #POPSRL142SU04 $3.04 Seems cheap and easy. Could use multiple wood strips both to move the speakers in and out and seal the air around the KH base similar to the vertical corner walls (adding a touch of foam at the triangle corners). Likely a major finger saver too. The metal sliders could be left in place. Would folks foam or weather strip seal the KH bottoms to the floor (if it could even be done) to prevent any movement through the “cracks”? Thx From NOLA with love
  2. Hi all, I recently purchased some single-owner Lascalas circa 1980. My intent is to use them as part of a mobile soundsystem, so I need them to work reliably. The balancing network is quite dusty, with noticeably aged original components. I am curious what you all might recommend as maintenance - my number one goal is to make these speakers reliable. Is there a good way to clean this balancing network? Do I need to? Should I replace any components? If I were to overhaul the balancing network, where might I start? Thanks!
  3. I copied my round up post over from this thread, please list any other LaScala mods, threads and parts sources. https://community.klipsch.com/index.php?/topic/149442-lascala-sonic-detail-improvement-for-only-22098/page-7#entry1926774 My LaScalas are circa 1980 Stock AA crossovers If I want to make improvements or changes in incremental steps, this is what I understand: Based on the above posts, and a conversation (2-3 years ago) with B Crites and the Klipsch factory support guy, the drivers in the LaScala don't wear out under normal circumstances. The capacitors, on the other hand do have an end of life, the transformer and inductor rarely fail (it would probably require an amp incinerating failure to fry the inductor or transformer). First: Update the 3 caps on the AA crossover, from the schematic in the pinned section. Stock: Sonicaps from Crites or others inc Parts Express brand. To me, stock always sounded very good 2x 2uF capacitors 1x 13uF Alternative Crossover update to lower the volume mids by 3db aka 50% decrease in power to Squawker. This is done to flatten the output across the bass and mids? I currently use an EQ to add output at the 400Hz point and rolling off into the up and down freqs from this point. 2x 2uF caps 1x 6.8 uF cap Both of these updates-mods are stand-alone and can be listened to and evaluated without further mods or repairs. Second This step could be either replace the K-77 (matched ?) phenolic tweeters with the Crites CT-125 EV driver with custom Crites Lens and titanium diaphragm. OR Replace the woofer with the Crites stamped Woofer $$, or Eminence Kappa 15C $, also mentioned above is the K-44 Factory $$$ woofer. http://www.parts-exp...-4-ohm--290-459 Both the tweeter and the woofer "upgrades" are standalone changes and require no mods to the crossover or anything else. Third If the K-77 is replaced with the Crites CT 125, as an option after moving to the CT-125.....the crossover point between the Squawker and the CT-125 can be lowered to take advantage of the increased range of the CT-125. Thread on CT-125 topic, one of many? https://community.kl...rs-in-la-scala/ Thread on Crossovers https://community.kl...pgrade-options/ Volti take on LaScala http://www.klipschup...upgrades2.shtml More horns + ALK http://www.alkeng.com/trachorn.html Alethia's take on custom crossovers http://www.aletheiaa...m/Services.html Crossover Options with CT-125: Do nothing leave at 400 and 6,000Hz, replace crossover 400 and 4,500 Hz, somehow modify existing crossover to 400 and 4,500. Forgot to mention the ALK Universal, I'm sure there are others.... The existing crossover may be modified, I don't know how. OR The AA crossover can be replaced with a new A 4500 from Crites http://www.critesspe...00-crossov.html "Problem with this is that the K-55 mid-range driver is pressed really hard to reach 6000hz. It would be much more linear in it's operation if the highest frequencies it has to reproduce were in the 4500hz area." Note: I'm guessing that PK the Designer was aware of this, and perhaps no better option was available than the EV K-77 tweeter, AND OR the mid-range K-55 is so sweet with the voice that it is better to leave as much of the voice as possible on the K-55 up to 400- 6KHz. Maybe if we had the engineer's notes we could know how the decision was made, I'm sure lots of trial and "does this sound better than"........ My opinion the LaScala: PK was a very good audio engineer, everything was done for a reason. Speakers that sound good, sell better. Was the mid range 400-6,000 intentionally boosted to put the human (Female) voice more forward aka Hear the Angels Singing? The K-55 really makes the angels sing. The low end could be better, a design trade off
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