Jump to content

Mr. Roy please?


colterphoto1
 Share

Recommended Posts

Ian, were the 'thousand' series speakers (1000, 3002, etc) all manufactured at WWR? Is that the designation? Also are all of the carpet covered boxes also from that era. We call those 'rat fur' around here. They aren't so highly prized for collectors because they usually smell of beer and cigarettes LOL.

Question- was there particular attention paid to the crossover networks in pro gear? For instance, the KP201 has same components for drivers as H II but sounds much better- is it the network? KP262- simple two way design that absolutely kicks- network again?

yer buddy,

Michael

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Greg, I recognize your surname but like you cannot put a face to it. We likely were in meetings together when we were looking at Telex assisting with KT product development. I recall there was also a bloke named Gangesh back then.

Yes, as a result of those meetings we'd undoubtedly recognize each other in person now. Alas, that was the beginning of the end for the Burnsville DSP group. At the end of 2000 the group was disbanded and all of its work sent to Straubing.

Greg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Michael,

FYI .......... Klipsch Inc sold the professional products business unit along with certain assets and licenses to WWR Technology who then successfully launched an IPO on NASDAQ with Klipsch Pro and 2 other insignificant electronics companies. WWR was then bought by Consolidated Technologies, another penny stock Wall Streeter. We just stuck along with always calling it Klipsch Professional (or Pro as it was known in the Klipsch community).

Now to answer your question: The "thousand" series as you call it actually had the series nomenclature of K-Pro and we called them rat fur as well. Initially we outsourced the cabinets as we did not have the knowledge of building boxes out of OSB and covering with carpet. Then after much experimentation we mastered the "art" and built them in house at the Klipsch Professional plant at N. Industrial Rd, Hope, AR. They were shipped smelling of contact cement not beer and smokes :)

Yes we did pay special attention to the crossover networks. Albeit based on the Heresy the KP201 was all pro. The networks were assembled onto our proprietry input panel in Mexico and along with fuse protection and real connectors had to be built to withstand the rigors of roadies. This typically demanded higher quality components and strong PCB's. This likely causes a perception of sounding better. As for the KP262??? not just the network making it sound good as this was designed in our parts bin mode but was "voiced" as a vocal sound reinforcement system. We used human voice on microphones not smooth sounding CD's to acheive this and the curve may not be flat but yes that box is an animal that purrs as it roars!!

Hope this info is helpful to you

Thack

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Good Day Sir;

Great to see you are still around. What are we doing now? I joined the forum because people were asking questions and no one would answr them.

Your input would be very helpful to the great people on this forum because you lived it!!! It has been very difficult to try to get any info from the new people at

Klipsch. They don' t know the pro product very well at all.

Well god to see your name again, take care Joey.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That's what I'm talking about. Keep em coming...

So are all the 'thousand' series covered in carpet, and all carpet covered Klipsch pro are therefore MDF?

Can you discuss the initial Pro offerings, how the division came to be?

Seems to me that the Cornwall became the CP1, which may have been too bulky to be carried easily and then morphed into the KP301, later the KP301II with Tractrix horn and then the KP362 trap cabinet. Further refinements on an old idea so to speak.

Love this stuff!

Michael

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thack!!!!! Now there's a voice from the past. Where are you now and are you and Georgia still together? If so, please also say hello to her from another voice out of the past. Hope you're doing ok. Before you ask, yeah, I'm still working, but not near as much as I used to. Only about as much as I want to. We are now in our 36th year and still using 100% Klipsch speakers. I'd probably have done a lot more in the past if the damn manufacturing company hadn't given up on live sound (pro) products.

The relationship with Klipsch was great in those early years even way before there was a Klipsch Professional division. Testing out potential product prototypes and getting some input into them certainly endeared me to the products. The names were interesting, ie: LBs (never made production) and BMFs (evolved into MCMs). I'll never forget using the wood prototype 600s on a small show. I was thrilled that things were really finally happening. When the Professional division started, I was thinking the sky's the limit. Product development went through an incredible period until the sky actually fell. I bet the Klipsch line array would have been a great one. Martin is about the only company that designed one with a really efficient horn loaded bottom. The first great Klipsch monitors came after playing with Martins and Tracy evolved those further into KSM-12 and KSM-15 (which I still use the final version today).

Let me know if you ever get down Florida way. I would love to catch up.

Bob

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Bill, a book will one day be written when I return to Australia and I will be "naming names" so to speak. But to quickly answer you I worked with everybody at Klipsch from P Wilbur and down and even married one. Most of us old school Klipsch folk are no longer with the company except for Jim Hunter amongst a few. I now live in Little Rock, AR and still have close ties to Hope. I moved from Klipsch to Community, then to EV/Midas Klark Teknik and eventually dbx/Allen & Heath until I just had enough of corporate USA and we returned to Arkansas. By the way Klipsch pro had a variety of owners ........................

Well dang it is a small world. I was talking to my Brit friend Andrew Hickling the other day and he asked if I knew you. I was telling him about my Jubilee clone project. I'm also in Little Rock. If your ever up for a few proper pints in town drop me a msg.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

For those reading about the protypes the LB was for Little Bast**d and BMF was the Big Mother ******. The engineering crew was an interesting lot to say the least in those days and those who worked on the BMF a.k.a. MCM1900 was a who's who of horn engineering. Paul Klipsch, Gary Gillum and even Don Keele (of EV CD horn fame) worked on it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

hey Arkansaw,

I'm always up for a few proper pint .... do you know or have heard of an Aussie that isn't? I didn't get your name?

I'm also Ian. I met Andrew years ago when I was bartening at Kelley's. Andrew once told me about his first night in Little Rock and he went out to pick up some beer after a long flight from Manchester. The grocery store had to explain to him about no beer on Sunday. ROFLMAO.... At least he didn't land in a dry county... Bloody hell an entire county dry [:'(] I once heard there was a hippie cult leader Down Under that forbade beer but they fed him to the Roo's. I usually hit Cregeen's, Flying Saucer, or Bosco's afterwork around 5. Just say when/where.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 year later...
  • 10 years later...

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...