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moose09876

RW-10D Blows Fuses - Any Ideas?

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My RW-10D blows the fuse every time I turn it on. I've looked over the boards, but can't find any components that are visually damaged. I'm a handy person, and have repaired 10+ Promedia 2.1 systems, but I'm just lost as to where to go from here. Spending the $100 and sending it back in just isn't in the budget right now. If anyone has a wiring diagram, or knows of frequently bad components, please let me know.

Thanks,

Mike

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FYI, I finally got brave and decided to short the fuse and see what started smoking. One of the mosfets (the one closest to the edge of the power board) pretty much exploded. I'm replacing that, along with the resistor that blew. I'll report back after I get the parts to let you know if that fixed it.

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Replaced the mosfet and the blown resistor, and it powered right up. There's another issue, but it's working for now. WOO HOO!!!!

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Just experienced the exact same symptom this past weekend... right before a 21st party [:'(]. Any chance of a picture of what you replaced? I haven't done the research yet, but is there a way to determine a bad mosfet from a good mosfet?

Have soldering iron and willing to give it a go before I fork out ~AU$400 for a replacement module.

LFaR.

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FWIW, I've since found quite a few posts on this topic as well as a fixya thread: http://www.fixya.com/support/t5614956-klipsch_rw_10d_when

Has a root-cause been identified? Is one of the components particularly vulnerable? It reminds me of a problem I had with my Onkyo AVR, where a resistor they used was under-rated which caused the LCD display to fail. A new resistor with higher rating fixed that. Could this also be an inappropriately rated component?

LFaR.

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Mine was the Mosfet on the right as you look atht he first picture on fixya. I know the Klipsch Promedia 2.1 systems had a 1/4W resistor, when there should have been a 1/2W. I bought a lot of 13 of those from a Best Buy warehouse that was getting rid of them.Replace 1 resistor, BAM. Still using them today.

I have no idea if it's a common problem or not. When mine blew, there wasn't much solid info on what was wrong. Hence why it came down to just shorting the fuse and seeing what blew up. Ended up saving me $133. You said it would cost AU$400 for a replacement module... How much is a new sub? IMO, it's worth shorting it out and replacing what's bad. Mine's sitll going STRONG.

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&You said it would cost AU$400 for a replacement module... How much is a new sub? IMO, it's worth shorting it out and replacing what's bad. Mine's sitll going STRONG.

I bought the sub with a bunch of other equipment, so don't have a separate invoice for it. I recall a figure of around AU$900, which was a little discounted from RRP at the time.

Yeah, I hear you moose. Spending AU$400 just to fix it, gets a little rediculous, epsecially considering the price of the MOSFETs will be substantially less. I'm travelling soon, so may not get a chance to play with this for a few weeks. A busy week ahead.

Cheers,

LFaR.

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Firstly, let me start out by shouting... Moose09876; you ROCK!

If it weren't for Moose's adventurous troubleshooting methods [;)], I could not have done this myself.

After getting many great tips from Moose, I ordered an IRF740 MOSFET N Channel, just $0.94 (yes 94 cents) , waited 3-weeks for it to be delivered [:o] , replaced the blown MOSFET, and my Subwoofer is BOOMING again!!! [:D] [:D] [H]

In case others have the same misfortune and are willing to have a go at fixing it themselves, I've recorded a few pics and tips. Naturally, you undertake this at your own risk. Whilst it worked for me, there's no guarantee it will work for you.

Remove bolts holding back plate and carefully remove it

Posted Image

The bad MOSFET is shown below

Posted Image

Remove cables and then remove power board to work on it. NOTE:Only work on the board when power is disconnected - and be careful not to touch the capacitors; they can store a jolt. You could use a capacitor drain resistor to be sure the capacitors have no stored energy.

Posted Image

Remove the MOSFET by first undoing the bolt that holds it to the heat-sink.

In my case, I removed the whole heat-sink in case I had to replace both MOSFETS. However, I'd suggest unbolt only the suspected MOSFET and if you have long-nose cutters, cut it's legs. This would only leave the 3-legs, detached from the MOSFET body. Desoldering 3-legs is much easier than trying to desolder the legs with the body still attached.

Posted Image

After removing the MOSFET (and desoldering its legs) from the power board, you must test the board to ensure the fault has been isolated. To do this safely:

a) Reconnect the red and black mains power connectors on the power board (leave all others disconnected)

B) Bolt the board to its mounting plate and reinstall the mounting plate onto the subwoofer box. Two or three screws should hold it securely enough.

c) Insert a fresh slow-blow fuse (1A)

d) Ensure the subwoofer's power switch is OFF

e) Insert power cord and and switch on at wall

f) Turn on the power at subwoofer

If the fuse still blows, then you need to keep troubleshooting; e.g. remove the 2nd MOSFET and repeat the steps above. On the other hand, if the fuse does not blow, then you are probably well on your way to repairing your unit.

Replace the MOSFET and solder it in place. Retest the board as above. Assuming a successful retest, continue to the next step.

For interest-sake, measure the output voltage of the power-module:

Posted Image

Posted Image

Reconnect the signal cable and the output power cables. Now retest. This time, your subwoofer should completely power-up. Start rejoicing... you're nearly there.

Disconnect power and once again remove the board so you can continue to work on it.

Apply non-conductive thermal paste and remember to install the thin plastic insulator between the MOSFET and the heat-sink.

Posted Image

Posted Image

Posted Image

Take your time. In this case, I needed to insert the bolt with the bent long-nose pliers. Then carefully hold the nut in place with a pair of straight long-nose pliers. I had just enough room to start rotating the bolt with my fingers, whilst still holding the nut with my pliers. Basically, do whatever works for you.

Posted Image

Glue the nuts in place (I used nail polish, but there are probably better glues for this)

http://i274.photobucket.com/albums/jj241/LiveFreeAndRoam/Klipsch/IMG_3017.jpg

Reconnect all those cables that you previously removed.

Rebolt the board to its mounting plate and reinstall it into the subwoofer.

Switch on the power and rejoice!!!!

Find your favourite movies/music and enjoy :)

LFaR.

  • Like 1

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Firstly, let me start out by shouting... Moose09876; you ROCK!

If it weren't for Moose's adventurous troubleshooting methods [ ;)], I could not have done this myself.

After getting many great tips from Moose, I ordered an IRF740 MOSFET N Channel, just $0.94 (yes 94 cents) , waited 3-weeks for it to be delivered [:o] , replaced the blown MOSFET, and my Subwoofer is BOOMING again!!! [:D] [:D] [H]

In case others have the same misfortune and are willing to have a go at fixing it themselves, I've recorded a few pics and tips. Naturally, you undertake this at your own risk. Whilst it worked for me, there's no guarantee it will work for you.

 

  1. Remove bolts holding back plate and carefully remove it

    IMG_1928.jpg

     

  2. The bad MOSFET is shown below

    IMG_1937.jpg?t=1288437666

     

  3. Remove cables and then remove power board to work on it. NOTE:Only work on the board when power is disconnected - and be careful not to touch the capacitors; they can store a jolt. You could use a capacitor drain resistor to be sure the capacitors have no stored energy.

    IMG_1934.jpg

     

  4. Remove the MOSFET by first undoing the bolt that holds it to the heat-sink.

    In my case, I removed the whole heat-sink in case I had to replace both MOSFETS. However, I'd suggest unbolt only the suspected MOSFET and if you have long-nose cutters, cut it's legs. This would only leave the 3-legs, detached from the MOSFET body. Desoldering 3-legs is much easier than trying to desolder the legs with the body still attached.

    IMG_3371.jpg

     

  5. After removing the MOSFET (and desoldering its legs) from the power board, you must test the board to ensure the fault has been isolated. To do this safely:

    a) Reconnect the red and black mains power connectors on the power board (leave all others disconnected)

    B) Bolt the board to its mounting plate and reinstall the mounting plate onto the subwoofer box. Two or three screws should hold it securely enough.

    c) Insert a fresh slow-blow fuse (1A)

    d) Ensure the subwoofer's power switch is OFF

    e) Insert power cord and and switch on at wall

    f) Turn on the power at subwoofer

     

    If the fuse still blows, then you need to keep troubleshooting; e.g. remove the 2nd MOSFET and repeat the steps above. On the other hand, if the fuse does not blow, then you are probably well on your way to repairing your unit.

     

  6. Replace the MOSFET and solder it in place. Retest the board as above. Assuming a successful retest, continue to the next step.

     

  7. For interest-sake, measure the output voltage of the power-module:

    IMG_3015.jpg

    IMG_3014.jpg

     

  8. Reconnect the signal cable and the output power cables. Now retest. This time, your subwoofer should completely power-up. Start rejoicing... you're nearly there.

     

  9. Disconnect power and once again remove the board so you can continue to work on it.

     

  10. Apply non-conductive thermal paste and remember to install the thin plastic insulator between the MOSFET and the heat-sink.

    IMG_3004.jpg

    IMG_3006.jpg

    IMG_3008.jpg

    Take your time. In this case, I needed to insert the bolt with the bent long-nose pliers. Then carefully hold the nut in place with a pair of straight long-nose pliers. I had just enough room to start rotating the bolt with my fingers, whilst still holding the nut with my pliers. Basically, do whatever works for you.

    IMG_3013.jpg

     

  11. Glue the nuts in place (I used nail polish, but there are probably better glues for this)

    http://i274.photobucket.com/albums/jj241/LiveFreeAndRoam/Klipsch/IMG_3017.jpg

     

  12. Reconnect all those cables that you previously removed.

     

  13. Rebolt the board to its mounting plate and reinstall it into the subwoofer.

     

  14. Switch on the power and rejoice!!!!

     

  15. Find your favourite movies/music and enjoy :)

     

LFaR.

Hey Live Free and Roam, I know its a longshot you may see this thread again, but did your sub continue working after replacing only the MOSFETS?  My sub died the other day, fuse is blown, everything looks immaculate inside though.  I ordered the MOSFETs and will replace them when they get here.  I am just curious if there is anything else that is causing/could cause this in the future?  Any help from any forum members would also be greatly appreciated.  It's a klipsch rw-10d as well.  Thanks in advance.

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Anybody have a permanent repair for this sub? Does changing the MOSFETs fix it? Mine is dead, no signs of any damage to the amp other than a blown fuse.

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Bump.

 

This is the mosfet board level repair thread Bandit resurrected.  It looked pretty helpful to me.

  • Like 1

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I'm hoping it will get it working for a few years at least.  The parts are coming from China I suppose (I wish amazon would specify that before ordering so I would know whether or not I want to wait that long), so once they arrive in a month or so, I will update if it works or not.

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I know this is old... Just checking on any new tips... My Sub 10 just bit the dust for the second time.  Bought a pulled amp on ebay several years ago then it sat in stand-by mode for several years.  Decided to start using the home theater again.  Strange tho.  Nothing burned.  Fuse is fine.  Just completely DOA.  No light.  Nada.  I've probed and I know some of the board is powering up.  Considering swapping with a Bash 300s but figured I'd try replacing the MOSFETs first.  Ordered several and will throw em in soon.

 

I do know one thing tho.  This is the last Klipsch anything I ever purchase!  Still have my dead Promedia THX 5.1 system boxed up in the garage!

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