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not too brag but how big is your digittal music files all added all up


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I've got millions of songs. I subscribed to the MicroSoft Zune store. It's about $14 a month and you get unlimited streaming and downloads. So long as your license key is current anything you download will play. If you cancel for a while all the songs you downloaded stay on your machine and you can reactivate at any time. You also get to pick 10 songs per month to keep permanently so a key is no longer required to play them. I don't have a Zune player. I just like access to the huge library of music. It's amazing what they have and for less than the price of a single CD each month I'm happy with the price point. The Zune desktop software is not the best but it's decent. It took me a couple of hours to get really comfortable with it. I was ready to uninstall it during the first 15 minutes but I stuck it out and once I got used to it I kind of like it. They offer a free two week trial so you can check it out. The drm encrypted songs are at 192kbps with 2 pass cbr. The drm free mp3s are 2pass cbr at 320 kbps.

I highly recommend taking the two week trial, just be prepared to spend a few hours learning the software.

Let me ask you this? Can I get that to work on my Macbook Pro? Can I also get it to work on my Ubuntu Linux box? What??? I can't???!!??? You mean Microsoft did not put out an Apple OS X or Linux version of the Zune software???!!?? D[8]mn, guess I'll have to just stick with good ol' eMusic.

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49 GB halfway through loading CD Collection. 5 GB in High Rez, three Max converted from FLAC to AIFF.

Pure Music / iTunes 1650 Songs, 4.7 Days.

99% of time there are less than 10 albums in active rotation but using iPad Remote has rasied this from 3 - 4 albums in active rotation.

I love the high Rez files 24/96 really approaches vinyl or live but I am impressed how good 328kbps MP3 sounds compared to 1,400kbps of CD.



As a modest aside, how do you like Pure Music? I posted a question a few months back about it and got no love. I'm messin' with tubes in my system right now so I don't need another variable at the moment but I'm DYIN' to try this software. Was there an obvious improvement to your ears?
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As of tonight - 1/6/2011, I have what is shown below. This will shortly increase as my eMusic account refreshed. In addition, that does not even count the many, many CDs that I've not even gotten around to ripping into the system. In addition, that is nearly ALL power/progressive metal. I could add another 4 or so gigs of mainstream crap that I've aquired over the years that I still have, but never bothered to include into my current main library (although still sitting out there on my file server). I also had some 500 megs or so worth of hip-hop/rap songs that I've ended up deleting, which I originally hung on to as "trade bait" back in the good'ol days of FTP/ratio sites. Since I don't bother engaging in any of that anymore, prefering to get my music through more "legitimate" channels, such as eMusic or Amazon, I just did not need to hang onto all that anymore and needed the space, so *poof* it went.

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I have not done an A - B comparison Pure Music to iTunes yet.

When my DAC3 that just arrived yesterday is finished breaking in I will do this and other tests on Fiber Optic Cable length and DAC3 to Benchmark Pre & Moon 100D comparison.

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you sure make grand assumptions ..what's the median age here? 40+? CD's have been around since the 80's, so it's not entirely out of the realm of possible that people have amassed a music collection and eventually ripped it to digital format. Or that enough disposable income exists to obtain vast amounts of digital media today.

btw - no case has been brought to court against people who strictly download. succesful prosecution relies on the act of sharing/uploading. be smart with your acquisition methods and leave the sanctimonious judgements out of general forums.

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you sure make grand assumptions ..what's the median age here? 40+? CD's have been around since the 80's, so it's not entirely out of the realm of possible that people have amassed a music collection and eventually ripped it to digital format. Or that enough disposable income exists to obtain vast amounts of digital media today.

btw - no case has been brought to court against people who strictly download. succesful prosecution relies on the act of sharing/uploading. be smart with your acquisition methods and leave the sanctimonious judgements out of general forums.

Agreed. I would say 75+% of my files are from my own cds which now are in two big plastic containers in my crawl space. Whew, what a job that was

getting all those cds downloaded.

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Well I started with wav files and now I'm doing to entire collection again to flac files using Exact Audio Copy.

My wav total isn't completed, still have 150 to 200 cd's and is

6,655 files, 254 gb on a 1 TB HD.

Man, I think I'm going to need a new HD.....

I still hope to be done this year with both..... my gf will bet against that....

James

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you sure make grand assumptions ..what's the median age here? 40+? CD's have been around since the 80's, so it's not entirely out of the realm of possible that people have amassed a music collection and eventually ripped it to digital format. Or that enough disposable income exists to obtain vast amounts of digital media today.

You beat me to it. I'll admit that I've engaged a bit back in the heady days of Napster, but now, nearly all of my tracks have come from directly from my CD collection or via eMusic or Amazon MP3. However, at the same time, I remember downloading many at track from the old MP3.com website. I found a lot of excellent music there at the time (partly what got me into the whole underground power/prog metal scene, as I was just getting so fed up with the trash being shovelled over the airways on regular FM radio). Nearly 12 years later, I still find myself listening to some of that stuff that I got from that site (although it is only in 128 kbps MP3). There are a good number of tracks that I got that came directly from the artists themselves. Amazing how much truly free music can be obtained in the underground power/prog metal scene, since a lot of these guys just simply want thier music to be heard. Two really good examples that I highly recommend anybody to check out right here - Silent Lapse and Ynis Vitrin. Heck, there is a WHOLE WEBSITE dedicated getting legitimate free heavy metal music! So yes, it is entirely possible that somebody could amass a large number of tracks completely legitimatly these days.

btw - no case has been brought to court against people who strictly download. succesful prosecution relies on the act of sharing/uploading. be smart with your acquisition methods and leave the sanctimonious judgements out of general forums.

At the risk of turning this thing into one big battle over the ethics of downloading music....

A-friggan-MEN! First, it is still very much true that there have been no court cases against people that simply downloaded music. Matter of fact, in some jurisdictions (I believe Canada is a classic example), downloading is even still considered legal, regardless of where the source came from, especially if you still happen to have a copy of the music in question on a physical medium, even if it is some dusty old 8-track copy that probably hasn't seen a player in over 20 years. It would be legally considered a "archival backup" as a result. Yes, the RIAA and thier lackies would have you think otherwise. Heck, this is the same outfit that tried to get CD ripping outlawed! Since they could not get the courts or the congress to play along, they resorted in an attempt to embed DRM on music CDs. Anybody that is familier with the whole Sony Rootkit fiasco, will very well know how that turned out. [:@]. As a result, I don't put a whole lot of stock in those clowns - another reason I'd rather support the small, independent labels. Heck, it is because of all the crap that the RIAA and the major labels pulled is what probably accounted for many folks basically giving them the middle fingure and saying, "well, if that is the way they are going to treat me as a paying customer, than I'll just go and download it for free from the internet instead. As far as I am concerned, the RIAA and the labels can all take the short express to hell." It is only in the last 5 years or so that it seems they finally managed to buy a clue (and I honostly think it was Apple, with the success of iTunes and iPod, in addition to the huge backlash from the Sony rootkit thing, that provided said clue), and started to make music more readily available at more reasonable prices, without all the ridiculous DRM restrictions. Not only that, seems that they started to actually make reasonable samples available for preview. Not just some crappy poor-quality 15 to 30-second clip like in the past, especially when said clip consisted entirely of audiance noise or the very opening riffs, when I'd like to actually hear some of the vocals and instrumentation in the main body of the song, but actually a good minute or more in full quality/fidelity. That also help to obviate the need to download music illegitimatly. I'll admit one of the big reasons I engaged in that was that I wanted to just hear the thing to find out what it sounded like and if I'll like it enough before dropping good money on it. As a result, I actually bought far more albums now, as this allowed me to discover and listen to new music that I otherwise would never have known about. Hell, I've gone to many more concerts as a result as well (once I found out that there was a club that actually catered to my preferred genre of music not even an hour from here - which I never even knew about before). Hell, I actually sponsor a festival now (ProgPower USA). You wanna know how many friggan albums I could've bought with that money???!!??? (let alone some really nice audio gear) And you'd be surprised at just how much really good music there actually is out there, especially once you get away from the top-40 mainstream stuff.

That being said, I don't suggest anybody to just go out and whole-sale download music just because they can. If you really like the artist, than at least do the decent thing and try to compensate them back for thier work.

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