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Making a sub cable


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I second the RG-6 from DD. I've built a many DIY sub cables with it and never a problem unless you include the day by buddy missed a step in the ceiling (his) and it wasn't Santa dropping by for a visit!

I forgot to mention you can go to your local Radio Shack and they've got adpaters that will screw in the finished ends of the Coax so you can then screw in the needed RCA ends that's if cripping is not your Forte'!

(No pun intended!)

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"FULLY LOADED"

J

This message has been edited by JTS8 on 04-17-2002 at 03:59 PM

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RG-6 Quad Shield is a good way to go
if you have a long run.You can use solder RCA's at
each end or "F"connectors with RCA adapters
The downside is its not very flexable but with
quadshield you will have no problem with electrical
interference

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I am HI-FI :)

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Is this basically just coaxial cable used to setup

tvs and vcrs with adapters screwed into the ends to allow

them to use RCA style connections? If so i never knew

you could use AV Coaxil wires for audio..

If this is somehting thats been done for a while and

not anything new dont mind the stupid question Im new

and trying to learn some new neat stuff Smile.gif

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Hey quick, I'm new to this also. I went to Rat Shack at lunch and got the adapters JTS8 suggested and will get the RG-6 quad shield coax in the next day or two. Heck, I can make a 50' sub cable for about $10! cwm20.gifI'm experimenting with my JBL 4638 and am trying it in different rooms because the neighbors are complaining.

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quad shield is a larger diameter than reg.rg-6(which should be fine)so you need the right f connectors. get a cable stripper and crimp the ends.avman.

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  • 3 years later...

The flat loss of RG-6 is ~ 3dB per 100 feet. You will be fine with your ~50 foot run

One more thing that is important with coax...be sure to use the proper hex crimp tool! Improperly crimping the cable will significantly alter the 75 ohm impedance of the cable. And the double foil, double braid is most definately worth it!

One other thing to consider, Parts Express has pre-made cables that you will be hard pressed to beat in terms of cost, especially when you consider the value of your time and the running around you will do to assemble all of the components.

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At audio frequencies the loss of rg6 is negligible. Especially since the sub input is very high impedance. and again at audio frequencies you dont give a hoot about the crips changing the impedance from 75 ohms. RG6 is made for a couple of Gigahertz. It is overkill for a sub cable. The only advantage is that it is sold in bulk at under 10 cents a foot. Even if there is a bit of loss, you will account for that when you setup your sub volume with a sound level meter or use one of the HT receivers with built in microphone and auto correction.

Oh, and I have tried to solder RG6. No can do. Buy the F type crimp connectors and the corresponding RCAs. You can also get crimp on RCA wich make a bit neater job, but they are harder to find. There are also some very nice solid, gold plated compression fit RCAs, but you need a special tool for that.

General suggestions: If you are begining to invest in audio and HT, buy a spool of good flexible video coax and some nice high quality solder on RCAs. This will last a long time and can be used for any custom length of audio, digital audio, and video cable.

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On 8/2/2005 8:42:03 PM efzauner wrote:

At audio frequencies the loss of rg6 is negligible. Especially since the sub input is very high impedance. and again at audio frequencies you dont give a hoot about the crips changing the impedance from 75 ohms. RG6 is made for a couple of Gigahertz. It is overkill for a sub cable. The only advantage is that it is sold in bulk at under 10 cents a foot. Even if there is a bit of loss, you will account for that when you setup your sub volume with a sound level meter or use one of the HT receivers with built in microphone and auto correction.

Oh, and I have tried to solder RG6. No can do. Buy the F type crimp connectors and the corresponding RCAs. You can also get crimp on RCA wich make a bit neater job, but they are harder to find. There are also some very nice solid, gold plated compression fit RCAs, but you need a special tool for that.

General suggestions: If you are begining to invest in audio and HT, buy a spool of good flexible video coax and some nice high quality solder on RCAs. This will last a long time and can be used for any custom length of audio, digital audio, and video cable.
----------------

Thanks for your post. Good information.

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On 8/2/2005 8:42:03 PM efzauner wrote:

Oh, and I have tried to solder RG6. No can do. Buy the F type crimp connectors and the corresponding RCAs. You can also get crimp on RCA wich make a bit neater job, but they are harder to find. There are also some very nice solid, gold plated compression fit RCAs, but you need a special tool for that.

I too researched this issue recently. I had been told by several people that quad-shielded cable was difficult to work with--I can't remember if it was due to a different diameter or perhaps soldering problems.

The most interesting comment was that "you should go with RG59 for audio because it is 100% copper instead of RG6 which is copper coated steel."

Here's some links to discussions regarding RG6 vs RG59 (I hope Klipsch permits links like this).

http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showthread.php?p=5720569#post5720569

http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/archive/index.php/t-438868.html

Interestingly enough, it turned out that you can get different types of RG59 and RG6, some with 100% copper and others with copper coated steel. 100% copper is said to be a better conductor and is easier to solder.

Similarly, many different types of shielding exists, some which prevents EMI interference better and others that prevent RFI interference better. Some people have used unshielded without problems, others haven't been so lucky.

Here's a helpful link to some premium cable (way too expensive for me) and a discussion regarding the shielding issues.

http://www.bluejeanscable.com/store/single/

http://www.bluejeanscable.com/store/single/subwoofer.htm

And the best cable that most forums identified was Canare LV77S, which I could never find anyone selling for a reasonable price. Here's the technical info on that cable and its shielding.

http://www.bluejeanscable.com/pages/technicaldocs/canarelv.pdf

And if you have money coming out of your ears, these are really pretty:

http://www.heartlandcables.com/

As for me, I went with dual-shielded 100% copper RG59 with gold plated Ultralink soldered connectors, which was somewhat a middle pricepoint.

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