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Amp or Bigger Receiver


bwilbur
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I am currently using a Yamaha RX-V667 receiver for a 5.1 system. I added my Yamaha MX-830 amp for the two fronts because it sounds bad *** when I play straight from my CD player to the MX-830. But, when running with the 667 it is a very lackluster experience. Even with the 830s gains up half way and the receiver volume near reference levels, the sound is no where near the expereince of the CD player with the 830 gain just barely on.

I was planning on buying an Emotiva UPA-5 (or similar) to replace all amp duties from the receiver but now I am thinking that I might be better of just getting a new and bigger receiver (thinking maybe Pioneer SC-1222). I don't really want to spend much more than $500 so a new receiver and new amp is out of the question.

Any thoughts or suggestions?

Thanks,

Brian

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With your cd player plugged directly to amps, your amps are getting an unadulterated, non-attenuated 2 volt signal.

You may be able to improve things simply by changing settings in the AVR, i.e. increase the levels for the front L and R to "0 db" or whatever the maximum setting is. You will have to turn down the gain control on the power amp so there is no net change in volume, of course, but you should get a hotter signal with better S/N to the amp by doing this. Give it a try.

When using the AVR, are you using the cd player strictly as a transport and sending the AVR a digital signal? You should. Keep the analog signal path as short as possible. The DACs and pre amp output of the AVR should be as good as those in the cd player, and if not hamstrung by processing or other settings, should be indistinguishable from the cd player to amp.

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When using the AVR, are you using the cd player strictly as a transport and sending the AVR a digital signal? You should. Keep the analog signal path as short as possible. The DACs and pre amp output of the AVR should be as good as those in the cd player, and if not hamstrung by processing or other settings, should be indistinguishable from the cd player to amp.

This CD player does not have a digital output. The CD player connects to the AVR through L/R RCA-style cords. But even digital signals such as my cable box have the same volume issues.

I will also try changing the channel levels. Thanks.

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If you get an amp, they last forever and will outperform a receiver in terms of power output. It should also make things easier down the road because processors tend to be a bit more future proof than AVRs. I've become a huge fan of separates and can't see myself ever going back.

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Why not just get another Yamaha amp if you have room for it to keep the same sound. I have an extra M 70 in great condition since I brought an M 80 in the fall. I like the sound of the vintage Yamaha amps. Something for the center is maybe all you need. I use a Pioneer SC35 to run some of the other speakers. I use a Carver M 400 for the center and that tiny amp is amazing pushing the RC 64.

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Oh, I just notice the Yamaha amp is in your 2 channel setup. Maybe a 3 channel amp will do the trick for your HT setup? One of the Pioneer avr is definetly a nice way to go also.

Technically, the amp is still with the HT setup but it will soon be moving to the 2-channel. In theory, I like the idea of adding a multi-channel amp to the HT but the yamaha amp didn't seem to add anything so I am skeptical about just getting a 3- or 5-channel amp. I am suspicious that it may be a low voltage issue with the avr.

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The Pioneer Elites seem to be not lacking on the power side. That may be just what you need, and listen to it for a week or two . You may find that it takes care of your HT and not need an amp. Amps can improve SQ, but if the avr is delivering the same power to the speakers, their will not be a dramatic difference since both units are operating in their comfort zone. Good luck on this quest.

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my dad has the Elite SC-55 from last year and it absolutely ROCKS my old KLFs. you can watch a full movie at extreme levels and the receiver never gets more than slightly warm on the top. the class D amps run very cool and pump out big power.

If I was to get a new AVR I would 100% look for the best Pioneer I could afford.

the one mentioned above looks even better for the $550 price.

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Amp no doubt. As long as your happy with the current processors your current avr has you will appreciate a new amp very much. At times i will put an amp in a spot even somthing that is huge on center and maybe have the gain down and it gets stuck(the amp)there cause it just sounds so damn good. The processor in your current receiver says it all. If you feel you can get better features then go new receiver. Amps can completely change these features for the good in most of my experiences. So your yamaha will become a preamp and run all the duties of sound. Power will be from the amp. Playing with amps is part of the fun

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I am currently using a Yamaha RX-V667 receiver for a 5.1 system. I added my Yamaha MX-830 amp for the two fronts because it sounds bad *** when I play straight from my CD player to the MX-830. But, when running with the 667 it is a very lackluster experience. Even with the 830s gains up half way and the receiver volume near reference levels, the sound is no where near the expereince of the CD player with the 830 gain just barely on.

How does the sound compare when level-matched? That's what's important. I think it's a gain structure problem; you already have a receiver and an outboard amp. You just need to get them working together.

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I just cut the gain/vol control on the Yamaha amps all the way up and let the avr adjust the signal to the amps during autocalibration. I have never tried to manually balance the amp gains to the avr. This may be what you meant by a voltage issue. This way I control everything thru the avr.

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Hard to guess what the issue might be, but sound quality is pretty rarely a my amp isn't big enough issue.

Volume knobs change the gain, the factor that defines input vs output signal level. Very often they are not set correctly.

AVR's also have lots of options to mess up the sound, start by turning all of them off or defeated.

Check that some basic wiring connection error hasn't been made.

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