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DizRotus

The BEST way to clean & preserve vinyl

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Thank you for this @DizRotus as I have now read the articles and an reviewing the threads - shopping list is ready. I am thinking of getting the denatured alcohol as well.

 

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I was clued into an ultrasonic LP cleaner about a week ago, the Audiodesk Systeme from Germany,  that does a fantastic job of cleaning and improving the sound from LPs, especially dirty ones.  I bought one on the recommendation of an audio distributor whom I have relied of for years.  It's very expensive, doubtless well beyond most forum members' financial interest. It was written up in Stereophile some months ago (link below).  I can vouch for every word of the Stereophile review, for whatever that's worth.  The problem, I regret to say, is the very high price: $3500 or $4,000.  Overture AV in Wilmington , DE has a few left on sale for $3,000, as much a bargain as I've heard of for this particular item, but that sale won't go on forever.

 

https://www.stereophile.com/content/audio-desk-systeme-vinyl-cleaner

 

 

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On 4/30/2018 at 12:16 AM, LarryC said:

I was clued into an ultrasonic LP cleaner about a week ago, the Audiodesk Systeme from Germany,  that does a fantastic job of cleaning and improving the sound from LPs, especially dirty ones.  I bought one on the recommendation of an audio distributor whom I have relied of for years.  It's very expensive, doubtless well beyond most forum members' financial interest. It was written up in Stereophile some months ago (link below).  I can vouch for every word of the Stereophile review, for whatever that's worth.  The problem, I regret to say, is the very high price: $3500 or $4,000.  Overture AV in Wilmington , DE has a few left on sale for $3,000, as much a bargain as I've heard of for this particular item, but that sale won't go on forever.

 

https://www.stereophile.com/content/audio-desk-systeme-vinyl-cleaner

 

 

 

Larry,  

 

The thread title is a statement, not a question.  Best of luck with your Uber expensive gizmo.  The word “static” did not appear in the review.  Static attracts and bonds dirt to vinyl.  IMO, it would clean better if you overcame the static bond, but then you wouldn’t need it.  Static is the key; everything else is secondary.  Ask Dave @Mallette.

 

This thread is about the BEST, not easiest, most expensive, or least expensive, way to clean vinyl records.  Naturally, you’re free to disagree.

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Wet washing with soap and thorough rinsing and soft paper towels used to be my preferred way of cleaning records and reducing static, and I still think it's pretty good, but a lot of work.  This gizmo, which works by cavitation and surfactant, seemed more effective than any other method I've used, including hand washing, judging by how clean my dirtiest records have looked and sounded after using it.  I settled on it by my own experience after others had suggested it.

 

The price was a definite barrier, but I wanted something that worked the best without a lot of trouble.  It is certainly very easy to use, and I am glad for that, since I'm now engaged in assessing and cleaning hundreds of my records.  I think the article mentioned static reduction in passing.   Youtube has several videos discussing it and other methods, some, including another cavitation cleaner, laughable.

 

Static is a tough one, as it can quickly reappear with low humidity.  I start getting pretty intense sparks from my finger to the tonearm lift when the relative humidity gets below below 30% on my hygrometer.  I turn on the humidifier when that happens, and it helps a lot.  But this gizmo does the best by sight and sound that I've seen and heard on tightly-bound dust and dirt, and static too.

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My experience with MGG is that once done, only dusting is necessary from then on. I've used it all, and nothing releases stuff like the goo. After that, just keep'em out of harm's way and dust with a Swiffer before playing.

Dave

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1 hour ago, LarryC said:

 

Static is a tough one, as it can quickly reappear with low humidity

 

No, as stated by Reg Williamson in his articles, once applied, Cyastat eliminates static indefinitely.

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DizRotus, I've read every word of this entire thread (which is impressive) and I've read every word in the recipe and TAA article.

 

I have some very important albums to clean up and this seems to be the best way ever created to do this. I've scoured the "Record Revirginizer" website for clues to whether or not it is the same formulation, but there just isn't enough information.

 

I am so very grateful to you and the others who have contributed to this amazing thread with some of the best information ever gathered on record preservation and cleaning, and I need to know if you still have any CYASTAT SN left, and if so can I follow the instructions in 109 to get some from you?

 

My biggest question is about how to "soft boil" in a pyrex double glass boiler. I'm not sure how you place your glass vase, in the water, or on top of something perforated to allow boiling without the water touching the glass?

 

For what it's worth, I'm a part time member of the San Antonio Symphony and I'm in the San Antonio Brass Band (Soprano Cornettist) and the San Antonio Wind Symphony and I'm on the board of directors for both of those groups as well. So, music is a big part of my life, nothing but family, my friends and my dog are more important to me.

 

Again, thanks for the information and your contributions!


David M.

 

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Hi David, @DaveTheTrumpeter

 

I replied to your PM.  Feel free to call.  A real double boiler works, if you want to risk sleeping in the dog house.  I use a heavy glass vase in a sauce pan.  The vase sits on a perforated metal vegetable steamer to allow the boiling water to circulate.

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I concur that I've yet to hear anything that gets close to this treatment. Earlier in this thread I speak of a treasured recording I kept, even though it had gotten conaminated with something I could clean with nothing...over 35 years of trying everything. It played with a steady hiss that was intolerable. This magical mystery goo restored it to "fresh opened."

Of course, you can't fix crap. Crappy recordings will still sound crappy, worn records will still be worn, and seed burns are for life. But if it is most anything not part of the vinyl this will clean it. As to static, I've noted none on any treated record for over two years now. I haven't been around long enough to personally vouch for the "permanent" static free, but I also have no reason to doubt it. As time consuming and the formulation of the stuff is complex, if you have a situation like I did you should go for it. 

 

Dave

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Thanks Mallette, for your input! I can’t wait to get all the ingredients and make up a batch. 

 

I have LPs that I’ve lugged all over the world (lived in Europe for 9 years and Asia for one year) and never listened to them until two months ago! 

 

So, I’ve been building my library, which is a lot of fun...and playing LPs scratches my OCD itch 😅

 

Articles and everything in this thread have taught me a lot, especially the negative effects of static on LPs and styli. It explains why crazy ideas such as WD-40 seem to work, but who knows what the other ingredients will do to the component parts of an LP.

 

ill be especially excited to share my findings with the Hi-Fi enthusiasts here in San Antonio.

 

Thanks, Dave, Neil and every contributor to this thread! 

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Hi Dave @Mallette

 

I still owe you the ready-made goop I promised.  At present, our kitchen is undergoing a remake.  As soon as we’re beyond indoor camping, I’ll mix up a batch in our new kitchen.

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Forgot to mention something. I used a sacrificial (not good condition and easily replaceable) 78 to test and found this treatment is not good for the materials in most 78s, unless relatively modern vinyl. It appears to act as a solvent and will make the surface noisier. Odd, since it is certainly completely non-reactive to vinyl. 

 

I've a few 10" early 50s LPs I am going to treat in the next few days. Will report.

 

Dave

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6 hours ago, DizRotus said:

I still owe you the ready-made goop I promised.

Fact is you already presented me with several of my favorite LPs that I thought were goners just by introducing me to this stuff...

Dave

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9 minutes ago, Mallette said:

Fact is you already presented me with several of my favorite LPs that I thought were goners just by introducing me to this stuff...

Dave

Best reply possible 👍

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16 hours ago, Mallette said:

Forgot to mention something. I used a sacrificial (not good condition and easily replaceable) 78 to test and found this treatment is not good for the materials in most 78s, unless relatively modern vinyl. It appears to act as a solvent and will make the surface noisier. Odd, since it is certainly completely non-reactive to vinyl.

 

Sorry, but not surprised, to hear this.  Although I never tried it on 78s, I always suspected that cardboard covered by shellac would not benefit from the Cyastat SN, as shellac’s chemical properties are vastly different from vinyl.  Leaving out the Cyastat SN would not eliminate the effects of the alcohol and PVA on the shellac.

 

I’ll get some sacrificial 78s and experiment with the recipe.  Of course, I’ll need to locate a turntable capable of playing 78s, as my Technics does only 45s and 33 1/3s.  Oh well, another excuse to acquire more gear.  If anyone has a 78 player they aren’t using, we should talk.

 

One of my biggest regrets is the loss of the Edison wax cylinder players my paternal grandfather owned.  I guess you would clean those with Q-Tips.

 

As an aside,  my grandfather’s experience argues strongly for a prenuptial agreement and better estate planning.  He had a large collection of valuable antiques that he and my grandmother had amassed.  In addition to the cylinder players (Edison and others) there were clocks, furniture and musical instruments.  After my grandmother died young, my grandfather was lonely until he met and married a woman much younger than he.  She brought him happiness for many more years, but I doubt he realized (I know my grandmother would have been pissed) that a lack of a prenuptial agreement coupled with a specific will passed everything to his second wife and eventually to her children from a prior marriage.

 

 

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3 hours ago, DizRotus said:

If anyone has a 78 player they aren’t using, we should talk.

Old Duals are good for 78 use.  Stanton 500 or Shure 44 with 78 stylus are good, cheap carts.

 

Dave

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Okies...will soon put up a wav recording from my latest MMG treatment and success. 1950 recording of Artie Shaw's Gramercy 5. I think it will speak for itself. Bought at a flea market and it had clearly been played and was quite visibly dirty. At the moment it sounds better than most modern recordings.  Have a 1951 Louis Armstrong being treated and will wait on it before making  full report.

 

Dave

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2 minutes ago, Mallette said:

Okies...will soon put up a wav recording from my latest MMG treatment and success. 1950 recording of Artie Shaw's Gramercy 5. I think it will speak for itself. Bought at a flea market and it had clearly been played and was quite visibly dirty. At the moment it sounds better than most modern recordings.  Have a 1951 Louis Armstrong being treated and will wait on it before making  full report.

 

Dave

 

OMG, I cannot wait to hear this! Wow 😮 

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