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JL Sargent

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Exercise day.  Thank goodness it finally started warming up here, my freezer was almost bare.  @Chief bonehead

 

 

lBN7khn.jpg?2

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, Max2 said:

Exercise day. 

Nice size :emotion-21: And good pic of little Maxx, pizzasaurus.

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42 minutes ago, KevinM said:

need another 8" sub from a rsb-14

 

41 minutes ago, KevinM said:

sorry wrong spot for this

 

Nice looking room, love the round fireplace front and all the stone, cool Bobcat mount.

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The "doghouse", my little space TBH    It is a shed with electricity.

is more like your favorite dive --- with the lights on.

 

maybe not great photos ... Had to use Auto

5ad1610b40420_DSCF0336(2).thumb.JPG.4f14483c855c86a0059fee183b400dda.JPG

 

5ad16131ba860_DSCF0341(2).thumb.JPG.5a96b49f56180bec0ded2dfed2ec7317.JPG

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Its been many, many years since I started my interest in photography which was before digital was introduced.  I was fortunate that around that time I came across a professional photographer who was more than willing to teach.  I knew very little at that time having taken a beginner's photo class in college and reading whatever material I was able to get a hold of -- but still, I was very much a beginner.  I learned a lot from him but I'll share a couple of interesting topics.

 

This particular photographer lived in South America and the price for film and developing was not inexpensive -- especially when you consider the relative cost to income ratios as compared to the U.S.  Because of this, he was very careful and selective each and every time he pressed that shutter button.  Think about this for a second, if it cost you say $5 every time you pressed the shutter button, how many photos would you be taking?  That's probably not too far off from what it was like for him back then considering inflation and today's dollars.  Now he was a pro, but almost every single photo he got was pretty amazing.  He also didn't take "duplicate" photos.  There were times when I would go shooting with him and he would come back having taken hardly any photos complaining that he wasn't able to concentrate.  I thought to myself, "concentrate," what do you mean -- all you gotta do is adjust some dials and press a button.  Why is it so hard to concentrate on that?  Well, of course he meant he wasn't able to concentrate on what is required for capturing a great image before your press that button -- the thinking part.  Eventually I learned that the thinking part is where great photos are made and understood what he was talking about.  Without it, you have to rely on luck to get a great shot.  I now shoot digital and it doesn't cost anything to press that shutter button.  But even so, I found it interesting when I realized that I don't take many more photos today than I did when I had to pay for film and processing.  I spend more time thinking and as such, not as much time pressing the shutter button.  I do believe I get better photos because of this.

 

One other thing this pro did that I found interesting and is mentioned in topics above.  For those photos that he did not like, he threw them away, despite the fact that each one costed him good money.  He recommend that I do the same -- which I did adopt eventually, although I've not been as thorough in that regard as he was, probably because my "keepers" were not in the same league as his "keepers."

 

One thing that I have done from the beginning with digital is to shoot raw.  This does mean that I have to digitally process every single photo I take, but shooting raw yields the best results as I have learned.  I didn't like this initially when I first switched from film to digital as it was more effort and it seemed like the quality wasn't there as it was with film (slides) -- that was partly because I didn't know how to process images correctly (and maybe I still don't).  But I do get more "keepers" this way.  I don't have to worry about white balance when I shoot because you set that later when you shoot raw.  Raw also has greater latitude with adjustments if you didn't quite get the exposure perfectly.  I have also found that post-processing is required for almost every shot to be its best, so shooting raw doesn't add that much extra time anyway.  Of course to do any post processing you really need to have a calibrated monitor, especially if you want to do any printing.

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Watching his homerun ball go over center field fence about 400'

Albert homer best.jpg

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8 hours ago, JMON said:

Its been many, many years since I started my interest in photography which was before digital was introduced.  I was fortunate that around that time I came across a professional photographer who was more than willing to teach.  I knew very little at that time having taken a beginner's photo class in college and reading whatever material I was able to get a hold of -- but still, I was very much a beginner.  I learned a lot from him but I'll share a couple of interesting topics.

 

This particular photographer lived in South America and the price for film and developing was not inexpensive -- especially when you consider the relative cost to income ratios as compared to the U.S.  Because of this, he was very careful and selective each and every time he pressed that shutter button.  Think about this for a second, if it cost you say $5 every time you pressed the shutter button, how many photos would you be taking?  That's probably not too far off from what it was like for him back then considering inflation and today's dollars.  Now he was a pro, but almost every single photo he got was pretty amazing.  He also didn't take "duplicate" photos.  There were times when I would go shooting with him and he would come back having taken hardly any photos complaining that he wasn't able to concentrate.  I thought to myself, "concentrate," what do you mean -- all you gotta do is adjust some dials and press a button.  Why is it so hard to concentrate on that?  Well, of course he meant he wasn't able to concentrate on what is required for capturing a great image before your press that button -- the thinking part.  Eventually I learned that the thinking part is where great photos are made and understood what he was talking about.  Without it, you have to rely on luck to get a great shot.  I now shoot digital and it doesn't cost anything to press that shutter button.  But even so, I found it interesting when I realized that I don't take many more photos today than I did when I had to pay for film and processing.  I spend more time thinking and as such, not as much time pressing the shutter button.  I do believe I get better photos because of this.

 

One other thing this pro did that I found interesting and is mentioned in topics above.  For those photos that he did not like, he threw them away, despite the fact that each one costed him good money.  He recommend that I do the same -- which I did adopt eventually, although I've not been as thorough in that regard as he was, probably because my "keepers" were not in the same league as his "keepers."

 

One thing that I have done from the beginning with digital is to shoot raw.  This does mean that I have to digitally process every single photo I take, but shooting raw yields the best results as I have learned.  I didn't like this initially when I first switched from film to digital as it was more effort and it seemed like the quality wasn't there as it was with film (slides) -- that was partly because I didn't know how to process images correctly (and maybe I still don't).  But I do get more "keepers" this way.  I don't have to worry about white balance when I shoot because you set that later when you shoot raw.  Raw also has greater latitude with adjustments if you didn't quite get the exposure perfectly.  I have also found that post-processing is required for almost every shot to be its best, so shooting raw doesn't add that much extra time anyway.  Of course to do any post processing you really need to have a calibrated monitor, especially if you want to do any printing.

 

This is excellent and so true. I worked for a few years as a news photographer (16mm film), but also carried a 35mm camera with me and took pics when I could. My inexpensive digital pocket camera died a few years ago and I mostly am taking snapshots with my phone.

 

Attending tons of events and gatherings with Filipinos, I end up being the one with six or eight cell phones taking pictures for everyone. They all go..."that's really good.. ooooh,  nice!" I DO take poorly framed shots with bad color, but some I won't let my wife use until I edit them. :rolleyes:

 

Bruce

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18 hours ago, KevinM said:

need another 8" sub from a rsb-14

room 001.JPG

Man thats a pretty room

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That's one heck of a shot, the rider has gone as far as he's going unless he's coming off the horse.

The horse might be at the apex of his buck, only one hoof on the ground.

Cloud of sand and the little buckaroo's expression of wonder!

 

Not particularly a photo-buff but that is exceptional @Sprinter1104!

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That hurts just looking at it, cool picture.

3 hours ago, JL Sargent said:

Caught this pick off attempt yesterday.

You said attempt but it looks like he would have got him, but at that angle it hard to tell how far the ball is from first base.

Very nice, do you let players have picture of themselves ? I ask because I doubt anyone else out there is getting pictures like yours. 

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10 hours ago, JMON said:

I was fortunate that around that time I came across a professional photographer who was more than willing to teach.

Everything you said is true but there is one other thing which in many cases is just as important.

 

It's just having a good eye for composition and in many cases this cannot be completely taught. 

 

I say this because we have 3 daughters all in there mid-late 30's. Over the years they all had an interest (off and on) in taking pictures, but just looking at what they do you can see some people just have a better eye with composition and overall capturing what they see. 

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