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Show us your great photography thread!


JL Sargent

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Ok, I'm gonna be outta likes shortly so consider yourselves liked.  I'm on pot #2 this morning and it's now noon here.  Bookmarked the link but I want the "secret" link he's got stashed...  hahaha  :)

 

You guys can line up all the wimmen you like but since I think outside the box my approach is a bit different.  Shooting sports and auto racing for almost 30 years I had my own battle plan.  Ya always have those guys with signs and yelling "Show me you cacas" at the race so I took it a step farther.  I'd toss the camping chair down about 30 - 40 yards down the road from them w/my 3 or 400/2.8 on.   

 

Worked EVERY time.  Best darkroom art on the planet!  Carry on!  :)

 

 

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On 7/30/2022 at 9:16 PM, Fido said:

It iwasnt easy making models 100% comfortable while so scantily clad. Tough work but someone has to do it. Thanks for understanding how hard my job has been all these years.

 

Making models feel at ease while being nude or near-nude (the model, that is, not the photographer, except in special cases) is made easier by being out of the model’s dating age range, i.e., much older, and by choosing lenses that keep you out of the model’s comfort zone, typically ten feet/3 metres or so.  The perspective is often better from that distance, anyway.

 

It also helps to belong to a local group of photographers, models, and makeup artists.  It makes both the shooter and the model feel more confident at the start of the shoot, because her reputation within the group, and yours, too, plus the MUA, if needed, is known in advance.

 

That way, if the shooter misbehaves (acting creepy towards the model, etc.), or the model is troublesome (frequently flaking, stealing stuff from your place, etc.), word gets around quickly, and that person will be getting few or no bookings in future, or be kicked out of the group.  Luckily, this has happened only once or twice.

 

In my case, it took a while to find a like-minded group of enthusiasts.  First, I joined the local camera club, who shot mostly birds, flowers, and landscapes.  Not really for me.  Then I put together the requisite set of pro-quality pictures, applied, and was accepted into the Professional Photographers Association of British Columbia (the PPABC, not the bigger PPA, the Professional Photographers of America).  There was a lot of learning opportunities there, but their emphases were making a profit and shooting portraits and weddings, none of which really appealed to me, so I left after a few years.

 

Finally, a model suggested that I should join Model Mayhem, an online photo group, so I did, and posted some pictures.  Then, I was contacted by a local shooter, and was asked to join a local Facebook photo group.  Finally, I had found a group of photographers, models, and makeup artists, who shared my photo interests.  It felt like coming home.

 

That process took a number of years.  I wish I’d known about that last group in the first place, but Facebook has only been around since 2004, so the group was just getting past it’s early phase then, so it worked out in the end.

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9 hours ago, geezin' said:

The tool for Pro photography in my day. Still have it. I could beat you to death with it and photograph the corpse...it's that big and tough.

 

DSC_1812_220tag5.thumb.JPG.cf62175f4b18940eaeefa4b241189bd8.JPG

 

I remember going to pawnshops in my early twenties, a long time ago, looking for lenses or maybe even a second camera, and there would always be some pro cameras on the shelves and in the windows.  Most often they'd be Nikon Fs, sometimes with the big Photomic meter on top of the prism housing.  Regardless of brand, they would all be black, in an era when most cameras were silver.  I should say mostly black, because a lot of the black paint would be scuffed off from years of hard use, showing the brass underneath.  In spite of looking like they'd been abused to death, they weren't dead yet, and were being sold as working cameras, maybe waiting for some young photographer who dreamed of becoming the next great photojournalist, powered by one of those old cameras that looked like it had already paid its dues, many times over.

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On 7/31/2022 at 8:45 PM, Islander said:

 

I remember going to pawnshops in my early twenties, a long time ago, looking for lenses or maybe even a second camera, and there would always be some pro cameras on the shelves and in the windows.  Most often they'd be Nikon Fs, sometimes with the big Photomic meter on top of the prism housing.

I still have an FM2, got it right before digital cameras took off. It's barely broken in. I was a tv news photographer in a former life, shooting 16mm film. Changed jobs when video gear arrived. Glad I did, the first video equip. was really heavy and cumbersome. Got to do some nice stories though. Bob Hope, Priscilla Presley, Ray Charles... and the more mundane city council meetings, etc.

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13 hours ago, Fido said:

Thanks for the kind words. It took me years to get the level of my work that was consistent enough to  actually leave me happy with my own work. 

Really amazing! Thank you for sharing.

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5 hours ago, Schu said:

This guy is next

 

Serious question: How do you eliminate the reflections of the photographer in the subject's eyes?

 

I always shot landscapes. Never had to deal with that problem.

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For sure I didn't take these... my dad in WWII. The one in flight school (he washed out), the other with the crew he was with based out of England (he's the short one in the middle).

John&B26CrewWWII-2.jpg

 

Dad_bw.jpg

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On 7/31/2022 at 11:00 AM, geezin' said:

The tool for Pro photography in my day. Still have it. I could beat you to death with it and photograph the corpse...it's that big and tough.

 

DSC_1812_220tag5.thumb.JPG.cf62175f4b18940eaeefa4b241189bd8.JPG

Nikon makes some fantastic cameras.

 

a few years ago @colterphoto1 let me borrow his n8008s.

Its fun shooting a more automatic film camera but it sure is easy to burn through film.

 

92970912-19BA-4FD2-A7C7-4470B5E31DC1.jpeg.141d0fd82ce0c7632ac92aba0b654118.jpeg

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