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.....Yes

the neighbor was fine. Taking a siesta. Sheesh. 

I'm sure I gave the cops something to talk about. Still pretty agile. Surprised myself

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45 minutes ago, WillyBob said:

.....Yes

the neighbor was fine. Taking a siesta. Sheesh. 

I'm sure I gave the cops something to talk about. Still pretty agile. Surprised myself

yup, your agility is what they are talking about!!😉

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Bet that made a big difference Mike, besides the bean the H20 makes the biggest difference.

Gotta check in here more often than I have lately, a hundred "E"s, half from here.. and you guys crack me up!

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1 hour ago, WillyBob said:

.....Yes

the neighbor was fine. Taking a siesta. Sheesh. 

I'm sure I gave the cops something to talk about. Still pretty agile. Surprised myself

Just lucky nothing hung up on the fence.

 

53 minutes ago, MookieStl said:

yup, your agility is what they are talking about!!😉

 I'm sure.

It had nothing to do with the only sarong in 500 miles or 1000

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3 hours ago, dirtmudd said:

best coffee improvement...

If your water sucks

 

I got use to the taste of extra minerals.

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9 minutes ago, dtel said:

If your water sucks

 

I got use to the taste of extra minerals.

chlorine and fluoride.... and a aging public water system..

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4 hours ago, Pete H said:

  Been rolling since 7, done mowing, weeding, checking the pool, now it's time to break out the pressure washer and get rolling on the concrete/deck and maybe even the truck. 

You left out your harassing texting.

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4 hours ago, The Dude said:

On a side note, this is my first time in 20 years of home ownership I have had to shop for and have carpet installed (mostly had hardwood floors and still do in most of the house). But dam carpet is expensive.

Get the thinnest, hardest pad they offer.  Your carpet will last a lot longer and need less stretching.

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1 hour ago, dirtmudd said:

chlorine and fluoride.... and a aging public water system..

We have been on well water for over 30 years so I forgot about what they add to city water, but do see in the news of areas under boil water restrictions at times.

 

Could be worse, the water for New Orleans and surrounding areas are taken from the Mississippi River. Upstream from New Orleans a  couple hours is Baton Rouge, it is full of oil refineries and chemical plants all along the river, then add in the other 2300 miles upstream.

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34 minutes ago, CECAA850 said:
5 hours ago, The Dude said:

On a side note, this is my first time in 20 years of home ownership I have had to shop for and have carpet installed (mostly had hardwood floors and still do in most of the house). But dam carpet is expensive.

Get the thinnest, hardest pad they offer.  Your carpet will last a lot longer and need less stretching.

If it were me I would stick with the hardwood floors, cheaper and easier to clean, even if they need to be refinished.

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31 minutes ago, dtel said:

We have been on well water for over 30 years so I forgot about what they add to city water, but do see in the news of areas under boil water restrictions at times.

 

Could be worse, the water for New Orleans and surrounding areas are taken from the Mississippi River. Upstream from New Orleans a  couple hours is Baton Rouge, it is full of oil refineries and chemical plants all along the river, then add in the other 2300 miles upstream.

 

I worked (retired) in the oil refining industry for 30 years, in the Operations Dept at the last new construction large oil refinery built in the USA. Currently that refinery processes approx  550,000 barrels of crude oil per day. Right on the Mississippi River in Garyville, LA. First off, oil and water do not mix, it just doesn't happen. It's called immiscible. So the water intakes drawing off the Mississippi are all below the surface, like 5-10 feet at all times. That precludes oil in drinking water plant suctions. Crude oil/engine oil/diesel/gasoline float atop water. It's a density thing.

 

Refinery river discharges into the river a closely monitored. I both worked in and supervised the Waste Water Treatment facility for a number of years. This is where we process all waste water (other than storm surge runoff) before it returns to the river. Skimmed for oil, solids, and processed/treated for other contaminants. Think real time in line analyzers, and sampling done every 4 hours and processed in our lab on the exiting effluent stream. Storm water (rain) is sent directly to the river via a common outlet ditch, but again is monitored by samples and visually every 4 hours. Storm water is runoff from the refinery paved streets, shelled areas of the process units outside of the slabbed areas. Slabbed areas within the units are routed to its own circuit (oily water sewer system) and to the WWT facility.

 

All of the chemical plants and oil refineries up and down the river follow these same basic strategies and process. And we have the LA DEQ to periodically monitor and keep us honest. And we report any incidents promptly to the DEQ. The greater threat to the Mississippi River and to drinking water is fertilizer runoff. Fertilizer/chemicals from farming, and any time a homeowner fertilizes their yard. Also fecal waste from raising livestock via runoff. Quite a bit of oil from the roads moved by rainstorms, leaked from trucks and other motor vehicles (this ends up ultimately in the Gulf of Mexico via the river). This has gotten better in the last 10-20 years. Any oil you see in parking lots or on the roadway systems via vehicle leakage or spillage ends up in the storm water system, to ultimately pollute rivers and lakes. There is a large "dead zone" in the Gulf of Mexico @ the river outlet more or less, and it's size and location varies with river flow volumes (seasonal).

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33 minutes ago, polizzio said:

This has gotten better in the last 10-20 years.

No doubt it's better but stuff happens, about 35+ years ago I worked for a bottled water company in N.O. and they had times when the city water was contaminated from chemical companies or refineries somewhere, usually the first one and everyone was advised to not drink the water, business was very good. We couldn't keep up most of the time, I remember Phenol was a big one.

This is not even counting like you said runoff from farms from here to 2000miles away. Streets and roadways are a big problem also, refineries also put out stuff into the air which falls. In St Bernard parish one of the refineries gave whoever asked coupons for free carwashes because there was regularly stuff falling out of the air to the point it left spots on your cars a  couple of time a week. You're probably right it's better now but they like any other business of making money try to get away with whatever they can, it's the way it is.

 

.

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Just for shitz and giggles, the Mississippi River flow volume @ Baton Rouge LA currently = 583,480,519 gallons per minute.

 

As reported by the USGS on their website. Keep in mind all the rain and flooding that has been going on in the central part of the US lately. The Bonne Carre Spillway in Norco (river diversion to Lake Ponchartrain) is open due to high levels and flow volumes. First time since it was constructed they had to open the spillway twice in one calendar year.

 

https://waterdata.usgs.gov/usa/nwis/uv?site_no=07374000

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3 minutes ago, dtel said:

No doubt it's better but stuff happens, about 35+ years ago I worked for a bottled water company in N.O. and they had times when the city water was contaminated from chemical companies or refineries somewhere, usually the first one and everyone was advised to not drink the water, business was very good. We couldn't keep up most of the time, I remember Phenol was a big one.

This is not even counting like you said runoff from farms from here to 2000miles away. Streets and roadways are a big problem also, refineries also put out stuff into the air which falls. In St Bernard parish one of the refineries gave whoever asked coupons for free carwashes because there was regularly stuff falling out of the air to the point it left spots on your cars a  couple of time a week. You're probably right it's better now but they like any other business of making money try to get away with whatever they can, it's the way it is.

 

Phenol is a threat depending on the concentration. We would store our phenol in a storage tank and inject it at a low rate constantly into our waste water effluent stream. To control the end concentration in the total effluent stream.

 

Oh yes, acid rain is def real. Again the fed government/EPA has regulated industry and monitors stack emissions and releases. For example, we monitor and test annually leakage at each valve be it a control or manual block valve. The hydrocarbons being vented to the atmosphere constantly, with a portable analyzer. Do you know how many valves we're talking about is a large refinery? I have no clue on the total count, but the responsible department in the refinery would know. Thousands of valves, and all valves leak @ the packing to some degree. Some more than others. Its a full time job to test, adjust, report findings. And that is just one aspect of emissions monitoring/reporting.

 

Believe me its 200% better than it was in the 1980s when I first started in the refinery.

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Haven't been to the city lately to see the river but last I read they have opened both spillways, no news lately if it's going down lately or not?

I think there is a lot of water still heading down here. I remember in the past going to the quarter and standing across from Jackson Square and the water was a few feet from the top of the levee, it's probably 25' lower on the street side. 

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1 minute ago, polizzio said:

Believe me its 200% better than it was in the 1980s when I first started in the refinery.

That's good to hear.

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They cancelled opening the Morganza Spillway. Only the Bonne Carre open now. Opening the Morganza impacts so many people, farmers, fishermen, livestock. Last resort. The river level is slowly dropping at this time.

 

Here in the live USGS river level data @ B.R. https://water.weather.gov/ahps2/hydrograph.php?wfo=lix&gage=btrl1

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I remember them postponing it but I thought they opened it, I know they were trying to avoid it.

Looks like the river is down a couple of feet, good thing.

Where in South Louisiana, I have/had relatives in Bourg and friends in Lafayette, the wife is from Slidell and I am from the 9th ward in N.O., yes the one you need a gun to two to visit now.

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12 hours ago, WillyBob said:

I have some of those. Old ones. 78 rpm old. Belonged to my grandfolk. 

 

 Mornin' Mike

Gia at camp?

 

the kid's b'day... 5. Hard to believe.   We made pancakes last week. I had her flipping them and everything. I'm teaching her. Wife is a lost cause. Set in her ways. Insists on [trying to] use one of those stupid plastic spatulas.

 

 

I left my coffee in the house again. I might be slow, but I'm not too bright.

 

No but she spent the day... Yesterday

At water safari....

https://www.watersafari.com

 

And now she's into cold coffee

IMG_20190623_204341_hdr.jpg

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2 hours ago, dtel said:

 

Where in South Louisiana, I have/had relatives in Bourg and friends in Lafayette, the wife is from Slidell and I am from the 9th ward in N.O., yes the one you need a gun to two to visit now.

 

I grew up in New Orleans til I was 17. Lived on the west bank in Algiers until I was 9, then uptown around Carrolton and Claiborne Ave. Growing up in N.O. was awesome! The music, the people, public transportation, the great food, and Mardi Gras.  I attended Holy Cross in the 9th ward for 3 years. Today I refuse to go to N.O. for a couple reasons. Violence and crime are the main ones. It's their city now.

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