Jump to content

Recommended Posts

If there is a slot between the back and/or front and the side panels as I described, then there wasn't a material problem that the glue didn't stick but a lack of gluing when the cabinet build occured.

Melamine may be a secondary problem but if you don't use enough glue, you loose either way.

With the titebond II on it 4 years ago, mine have gone 1400 miles two ways on rough roads in the back of a pick up truck bouncing around on terrible highways, no issues. The gorilla glue in the slot would likely work just as well.

If yours are falling off, just take them off and redo them, roughing up the surfaces and using the appropriate amount of glue.

Yes there appears to be a slot all the away around , you think a lack of glue applied is the issue??

Link to comment
Share on other sites

tracy, i am in iowa too. where abouts are you? PM me if you want.

i agree the KLF & KG series boxes were built very poorly, many people have the same issues. if its just a couple corners lose on the back boards i would seriously consider using the tite bond or gorilla glue approach, especially if you aren't planning on keeping them for awhile & may sell them. you can add some reinforcing blocks if you want the extra insurance.

as stated, good luck with the repair

Link to comment
Share on other sites

tracy, i am in iowa too. where abouts are you? PM me if you want.

i agree the KLF & KG series boxes were built very poorly, many people have the same issues. if its just a couple corners lose on the back boards i would seriously consider using the tite bond or gorilla glue approach, especially if you aren't planning on keeping them for awhile & may sell them. you can add some reinforcing blocks if you want the extra insurance.

as stated, good luck with the repair

I live in Oskaloosa iowa

Link to comment
Share on other sites

you are not too far, i'm in cedar rapids. i just drove to oskaloosa about a month ago to buy my k-horns.

chuckab3: not to worry you, but do you listen to bass heavy music at higher than "average" volumes? thats usually when the vibration noises show up. yours could have a problem & you wouldnt even know it if you never cranked them up. but if you dont hear it, its not really a problem. ;)

Edited by klipschfancf4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

tracy, i am in iowa too. where abouts are you? PM me if you want.

i agree the KLF & KG series boxes were built very poorly, many people have the same issues. if its just a couple corners lose on the back boards i would seriously consider using the tite bond or gorilla glue approach, especially if you aren't planning on keeping them for awhile & may sell them. you can add some reinforcing blocks if you want the extra insurance.

as stated, good luck with the repair

I live in Oskaloosa, IA

Link to comment
Share on other sites

you are not too far, i'm in cedar rapids. i just drove to oskaloosa about a month ago to buy my k-horns.

chuckab3: not to worry you, but do you listen to bass heavy music at higher than "average" volumes? thats usually when the vibration noises show up. yours could have a problem & you wouldnt even know it if you never cranked them up. but if you dont hear it, its not really a problem. ;)

tracy, i am in iowa too. where abouts are you? PM me if you want.

i agree the KLF & KG series boxes were built very poorly, many people have the same issues. if its just a couple corners lose on the back boards i would seriously consider using the tite bond or gorilla glue approach, especially if you aren't planning on keeping them for awhile & may sell them. you can add some reinforcing blocks if you want the extra insurance.

as stated, good luck with the repair

Thanks, I will do that. They are great sounding speakers and will be worth doing

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Hi everybody,

In reference to my first topic I began with the vibration on the KLF 30's, I have started the project. During this I found a couple of baffles loose enough that I just went ahead and pulled them out. I will rough up the edges and glue the whole thing. If someone would help me with some good advice, my questions are:

1) One speaker did not have supports in the center. Using plywood for the main support sufficient and what type of wood do I use for 1" x 1" pieces that are part of that assembly?

2) The configuration of the foam installed inside each one was different, which is the best way to re-install the foam for proper air flow?

3) Who has attempted to install an interior frame and just glued and screwed the panels on?

4) One panel is loose halfway down, proceed taking it off or just re-glue?

5) Lastly, just confirmation that Titebond II is the best to use for this project and how much to apply to eliminate the chance of glue running out of the seam.

Your replies would be appreciated

Thanks

Link to comment
Share on other sites

hi, sorry to hear the boards were that loose. i will give my opinion but im sure others & moray james will have some "bettter" opinions.

1) plywood is ok but mdf may be better as its less resonate. also standard pine 2x4's cut up or 1"x1" is fine for other areas of framing/bracing.

2) i have seen a few klipsch that had variations in the amount of foam. basically they just layed in in there loosly on the sides & curved it around the top. keep it away from blocking the ports if possible, other than that, just mimic how it was originally.

3) i have never did the frame/screw approach but im sure its pretty simple, just attach some 1x1's in the right place to screw the boards to. but if you arent upgrading these to keep for a long time i dont feel thats needed, the gorilla glue or tight bond is VERY strong stuff & will last the life of the speaker. when applied right & fully cured the gorilla glue is actually stronger than the wood itself. it will pull apart the plys of plywood or break up MDF before it lets go.

4) i would just reglue that panel, taking it off is a lot of work & as stated above could cause more problems & effort than its worth.

5) i've never used the titebond on speakers so i will leae that to someone that has. however, i strongly suggest looking into the gorilla glue, it really is amazing stuff & when applied right (according to directions on the label) it expands & creeps into seams & areas i dont think titebond will reach. rough up the surface as much as you can, (80 grit sand paper) or even remove the thin layer of melamite & either glue will be a lifetime repair IMO.

good luck!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

I picked up a pair of KLF-30's today for $500.00. The guy said one was fine but the other one had this exact problem both the front and backs were completely disconnected from the cabinet. looking in with a flashlight I immediately saw that they had glued to melamine. I taped the front and back in with packing tape and gave them a spin, very nice sounding. I think I'll go with the 3/4" strips all the way around both openings, rid the baffle and back of the melamine around the edges and glue them up nice and tight.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

silicone?? not a very good adhesive for something like a speaker cabinet. especially if its the DAP stuff i see in the caulk gun. thats more of a light duty household type stuff. but im sure its ok if you screwed the boards too.

klipsch used a very strong hot glue for their cabinets, aside from the bad batch they had that caused problems. & most others that repair them use a real construction adhesive like titebond or liquid nails etc, personally i like gorilla glue. but again, dont mean to scare you, im sure the silicone & screws will be ok.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Over at the Polk Universe they swear by Locktite adhesive, It dries clear and gives off no offending gases. Gorilla Glue will work also. Silicon not very good as a wood adhesive. I used Liquid Nails on my 2B cabinets w/ the proper caulking gun so I got it in all the seems and had clamps and left them alone for a few days and w/ the new gaskets a cockaroach wouldn't last more than a minute or 2 w/o air. I also did the good old pressure test and my mids came back slowly after 4/5 seconds which is right in the middle.Some say longer, some say much longer and I don't believe them 10 seconds no way.

http://www.loctiteproducts.com/contact-adhesives.shtml

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...

These are the changes I have made to my KLF 30's in the last month.

Removed the feet and replaced with a piece of carpet to eliminate the gap between floor and cabinet. (Only because I had hard wood floors, made a surprising difference for the better)

Replaced gold plated connectors between terminals with 12 gauge stranded copper wire. ( Made a profound difference)

Removed the port tubes. (Doesn't go quite as low in the bass region but the vocal harmonics are not muffled sounding and they ring out like they're supposed to now)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 years later...

My KLF-30s have not come apart...yet. So I was wondering if I should put wood screws in the cabs to prevent the glue or help the glue not come apart? Has anybody ever done that? Also, talking about glues to use, there are a few marine sealants that are very thin made to weep there way into cracks. One is called Captain Tolley's and one is called Gluvit which I have used and can attest to how strong it is. Might work on these speakers, but it just seems like putting screws in would strengthen the factory bond?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...