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3619 vs 3619-ET hook up


awsjr
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Where did you get the units from, some instructions should have been packed with them.

With the latest iteration of the Universal, we decided on a redesign that would take advantage of the ability to attenuate in 1dB steps. This involved adding more input taps as well as additional output taps. With the change in design to the Universal and the new autoformer, Al came up with the idea to relabel the taps to reflect what they actually did, as opposed to just having numbers that didn't really tell you anything. A cool idea - but can present a problem if you're using them to build one of the earlier iterations - which are actually wired differently.

You will need a conversion chart for the autoformer taps, as well as a chart which tells you the attenuation numbers, and I don't believe Al ever created one. Incidentally, my 3670 is labeled the same way - which is very straightforward and logical. At any rate, the autoformer best suited for these older ALK designs is the 3636, because it uses the older labeling convention, and we have conversion and attenuation charts for that one. Maybe you can talk Bob into a trade, since the 3619-ET can easily be used for any of the Klipsch builds. For various reasons, Al and myself are both done supporting DIY efforts. That doesn't mean if you contact Al that he won't help you, he might - or might not.

The 3619-ET and 3670 both have 3 input taps and 6 output taps. The input taps are labeled -0, -1, and -2. The output taps are 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, and 18. You subtract the input tap from the output tap, which gives you the attenuation level. For example: if your squawker needs to be 13dB down, your primary connection from the amplifier to the autotransformer would connect to input tap -2, and your output tap back to the squawker would be tap 15 (15 -2 = 13), and yes "C" stands for Common, and is what "0" used to be.

Like I said earlier- works great for Klipsch networks and newer ALK type builds (for which schematics are not available).

Basic conversion chart would look like this, but it doesn't help you much if you're trying to build an older Universal or Super AA.

T2A > 3619-ET/3670

0 > C

5 > -0 (input)

> -1 (input)

> -2 (input)

4 > 3 (-3 dB, output)

3 > 6 (-6 dB, output)

2 > 9 (-9 dB, output)

1 > 12 (-12 dB, output)

> 15 (-15 dB, output)

> 18 (-18 dB, output)

... Along with all of the in-between settings by taking advantage of the additional input taps.

Edited by DeanG
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Hi Dean... thanks for the reply... I bought them from you some time ago and thought I would finally install them...

yes I have a sheet that describes the attenuation but I am confused about the swamping resistor hook up... 

 

 

I am going to send you a message if you don't mind regarding that... I see you indicated you are not

supporting DIY anymore and if you aren't interested let me know... thanks - Al

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Al

 

If you go to ALK's website under Extreme slope crossovers, you will find a picture of my ES5800T crossover.  If you plan on taking

advantage of all 3 input taps, you can get an idea of how to connect the resistor (although the connection to ground my be easier

elsewhere on your crossover).

 

Mike

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  • 7 years later...
On 2/21/2015 at 10:51 PM, Crankysoldermeister said:

Where did you get the units from, some instructions should have been packed with them.

With the latest iteration of the Universal, we decided on a redesign that would take advantage of the ability to attenuate in 1dB steps. This involved adding more input taps as well as additional output taps. With the change in design to the Universal and the new autoformer, Al came up with the idea to relabel the taps to reflect what they actually did, as opposed to just having numbers that didn't really tell you anything. A cool idea - but can present a problem if you're using them to build one of the earlier iterations - which are actually wired differently.

You will need a conversion chart for the autoformer taps, as well as a chart which tells you the attenuation numbers, and I don't believe Al ever created one. Incidentally, my 3670 is labeled the same way - which is very straightforward and logical. At any rate, the autoformer best suited for these older ALK designs is the 3636, because it uses the older labeling convention, and we have conversion and attenuation charts for that one. Maybe you can talk Bob into a trade, since the 3619-ET can easily be used for any of the Klipsch builds. For various reasons, Al and myself are both done supporting DIY efforts. That doesn't mean if you contact Al that he won't help you, he might - or might not.

The 3619-ET and 3670 both have 3 input taps and 6 output taps. The input taps are labeled -0, -1, and -2. The output taps are 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, and 18. You subtract the input tap from the output tap, which gives you the attenuation level. For example: if your squawker needs to be 13dB down, your primary connection from the amplifier to the autotransformer would connect to input tap -2, and your output tap back to the squawker would be tap 15 (15 -2 = 13), and yes "C" stands for Common, and is what "0" used to be.

Like I said earlier- works great for Klipsch networks and newer ALK type builds (for which schematics are not available).

Basic conversion chart would look like this, but it doesn't help you much if you're trying to build an older Universal or Super AA.

T2A > 3619-ET/3670

0 > C

5 > -0 (input)

> -1 (input)

> -2 (input)

4 > 3 (-3 dB, output)

3 > 6 (-6 dB, output)

2 > 9 (-9 dB, output)

1 > 12 (-12 dB, output)

> 15 (-15 dB, output)

> 18 (-18 dB, output)

... Along with all of the in-between settings by taking advantage of the additional input taps.

 

Now I'm confused.  As I understand it, the earlier Universal's with the 3619 left both squawker outputs floating...neither "+" or "-" were directly tied to common. This allowed the squawker output's polarity to be reversed by, say, connecting tap X to output "+" and tap 4 to output tap "-".

 

It looks to me that the newer Universal with the 3619-ET has tap C connected to the squawker out "-", which is also connected to the common wire.  Any one of the output taps 3 thru 18 is connected to squawker out "+".

 

It seems to me that the polarity to the squawker is no longer reversed???  

 

Am I seeing this wrong or was this also a design change with the newer Universal's?   I assume the lowpass to the squawker is still second order.

 

Mike
 

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5 hours ago, mboxler said:

 

Now I'm confused.  As I understand it, the earlier Universal's with the 3619 left both squawker outputs floating...neither "+" or "-" were directly tied to common. This allowed the squawker output's polarity to be reversed by, say, connecting tap X to output "+" and tap 4 to output tap "-".

 

It looks to me that the newer Universal with the 3619-ET has tap C connected to the squawker out "-", which is also connected to the common wire.  Any one of the output taps 3 thru 18 is connected to squawker out "+".

 

It seems to me that the polarity to the squawker is no longer reversed???  

 

Am I seeing this wrong or was this also a design change with the newer Universal's?   I assume the lowpass to the squawker is still second order.

 

Mike
 

 

This does not answer your question, but here are old notes on the 3619 if anyone needs the refeerence.

 

 

3619 Tap Settings.pdf

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8 hours ago, Crankysoldermeister said:

 

It's reversed on the network side, on the terminal strip.

 

I was planning on connecting the common strap (and tap C) to squawker "+" and the 3619-ET output tap to squawker "-".  Looking at Al's website picture of his Universal Economy, it sure looks like the 3619-ET tap "6" is connected to squawker "+".  I assume tap C is connected to the common side of the "swamping" resistor and the common wire strap is connected to squawker "-".   The picture is at a bad angle so I guess I'm seeing it wrong.

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