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Heresy 1 for studio mixing

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I'm new to the forum and new to Klipsch. About two weeks ago my brother in law gave me a pair of 1979 Heresy's, HBR, in perfect working order, though the cab could use a refinish. He got two pair, these and a pair of Heresy 2, at a great price and figured he'd share the love. Lol. I have a home recording studio, have been playing guitar for almost 40 years and build, repair and service tube guitar amps. I also dabble with tube Hi Fi, so naturally, I strive for the best, accurate sound I can get, which leads me to Klipsch. My prior experience with Klipsch has been limited, we used the Heresy Insustral Ported speakers as stage monitors in a band I was in during the 80's, they were good, but I don't remember them sounding this great.

Earlier today I decided to try them on a mix of a new song that I've been working on. I've been having a tough time getting it to sound right on various systems, car, surround system, iPod, etc. Through the Heresy's it took me about 10 minutes total to fix and sounds excellent through everything that I played it through after. I sent it off to the client and they're very happy with the result, so much that they asked me to mix three other songs they just finished tracking. Normally, I mix through JBL and Behringer Studio monitors. The Heresy's provide so much more detail and are lifelike, I could hear everything instantly.

I've been listening to these speakers every chance I get. So far I've tried them with my cheap Sony surround receiver and my 1986 Technics 100 watt per channel stereo, which I used for the mix. Not everything sounds great though, a poor recording, bad mix or weak gear is apparent, but that's what I enjoy most, accuracy. I'm surprised at how good the Technics sounds with them and can't wait to retube my Dynaco ST70 tomorrow and hear my favorite vinyl.

I'm a Klipsch fan now and expect that I'll be getting more, maybe Cornwalls or KHorns eventually, maybe just another pair of Heresy's. Life is too short to not have the best sound that you can.

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welcome to the forum! just so you know...WE LOVE PICTURES!!!!

 

so, if you get a chance, please feel free to post some.

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Hey Stump welcome to the form.

Yea man .......Klipsch get some more....lol lol

Let us know what you think of the Heresy's with that Dynaco ST70.

Take care...

MKP :-)

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Thanks for the welcome. I'll post some pics as soon as I take some.:)

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Heresy on quad el34's are so glorious. For Studio reference to near any recording descent quad el34 and any pair of working heresy are perfection. Heresy on el84's won my heart and led to klipsch addiction and or my klipsch faithful attention mindset. Heresy are a standard to audio. They can be easy to find at times and parts are easy to get in most cases. Get a small or large tube amp and just live life to its fullest. There is nothing more anybody needs other than a tube amp and heresy'

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Stump, welcome to the forum.

 

a pair of 1979 Heresy's

 

My first pair of Heresies are from 78, my third is from 78.  These are some of my favorite Klipsch, and I could see how they would make great studio monitors. 

 

Heresy on el84's won my heart
 

 

I run my Heresies on a Scott 222c which is a Quad EL84, and I love it.  Gothover recommend the Dynaco St-35, and I can see why.   I haven't heard them on a EL34 amp, but could  image they would sound great.  

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Great post. Welcome aboard!  :emotion-22:

 

Amongst a couple other differences, the most audible is that the industrials are voiced differently from a standard Heresy for their specific application. They run essentially un-corked, trading balance for maximum sensitivity and thusly require EQ.

 

The home versions are much more user friendly in that regard. Good sound.

Edited by Quiet_Hollow
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Stump, welcome to the forum.

 

 

 

a pair of 1979 Heresy's

 

My first pair of Heresies are from 78, my third is from 78.  These are some of my favorite Klipsch, and I could see how they would make great studio monitors. 

 

 

 

Heresy on el84's won my heart
 

 

I run my Heresies on a Scott 222c which is a Quad EL84, and I love it.  Gothover recommend the Dynaco St-35, and I can see why.   I haven't heard them on a EL34 amp, but could  image they would sound great.  

That 222c would be tops! The st-35 is a well rounded rockin amp. I used a knight kn724 with el84's for a long time and miss it. That with some h2's was my 1st real klipsch system.

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I'm gonna build an ST35 clone soon because I've heard that they sound incredible through efficient, balanced speakers. My EL84 guitar amps have a different character than my EL34 amps, Class A vs. AB, in addition to other design differences. Both sound great, but different. Haven't tried the ST70 yet, heading out for Easter dinner, but will check it out when I get home later today. I love tubes!

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Welcome to the forums!

Glad you found the Heresy speakers, I have some HIIs. I've done most of my mixing on JBL 4311s, and have wanted to try some mixes with Heresy IIs.

I'm curious, how do you mix? Real mixer, DAW? I've done both, but have new software I'm wanting to try. Just found a bunch of different places online where you can download high quality track to practice mixing, submit mixes for critique.

Bruce

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Stump, welcome to the forum.

 

 

 

a pair of 1979 Heresy's

 

My first pair of Heresies are from 78, my third is from 78.  These are some of my favorite Klipsch, and I could see how they would make great studio monitors. 

 

 

 

Heresy on el84's won my heart
 

 

I run my Heresies on a Scott 222c which is a Quad EL84, and I love it.  Gothover recommend the Dynaco St-35, and I can see why.   I haven't heard them on a EL34 amp, but could  image they would sound great.  

yep, I also have a pair of 79 Heresies with a Scott 222c (I have the EL84M's), rebuild by Craig. Need that subwoofer tho, I'm using an Energy S12.3 and it sounds fantastic.

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Welcome to the forums!

Glad you found the Heresy speakers, I have some HIIs. I've done most of my mixing on JBL 4311s, and have wanted to try some mixes with Heresy IIs.

I'm curious, how do you mix? Real mixer, DAW? I've done both, but have new software I'm wanting to try. Just found a bunch of different places online where you can download high quality track to practice mixing, submit mixes for critique.

Bruce

I typically do everything in my DAW, but would much rather use a mixer/control surface, like the old days of tape. A control surface is on my short list, I don't have a problem doing it in the box, I just find that faders keep everything moving and the work flow is better for me. I've downloaded some great tracks that I used as reference for tracking, levels, mixing and mastering practice. It's a great way to improve your skills. What software do you have? I use Reaper and am very happy with it, I used to use Pro Tools and before that Cakewalk.

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I still haven't had a chance to use my ST70's with the Heresy's yet. Had to finish up a couple of guitar amp repairs for clients to pick up today and got another one in for restoration, a 1974 Fender Deluxe Reverb. I've got five amps to do at the moment, three vintage restorations, a Mesa with a broken reverb circuit and a beastly SVT Bass Amp, which WILL be the last SVT I take in for repair, other than tube replacement. It weighs about 90 pounds and the PC boards are shoe horned in on top of each other. I'm doing it for a friend, which is the only reason I'm doing it. In the beginning, I was only gonna work on vintage Marshall's, then I started doing vintage Fenders, then modern Marshall's, then modern Fender's, then.... Well you get the idea. With any luck, I'll have the time to retube and bias the ST 70 tomorrow. I'll probably do the cap job while I'm at it, been putting it off for about six months now, and I'm sure it will be an improvement in sound and reliability.

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Welcome to the forums!

Glad you found the Heresy speakers, I have some HIIs. I've done most of my mixing on JBL 4311s, and have wanted to try some mixes with Heresy IIs.

I'm curious, how do you mix? Real mixer, DAW? I've done both, but have new software I'm wanting to try. Just found a bunch of different places online where you can download high quality track to practice mixing, submit mixes for critique.

Bruce

I typically do everything in my DAW, but would much rather use a mixer/control surface, like the old days of tape. A control surface is on my short list, I don't have a problem doing it in the box, I just find that faders keep everything moving and the work flow is better for me. I've downloaded some great tracks that I used as reference for tracking, levels, mixing and mastering practice. It's a great way to improve your skills. What software do you have? I use Reaper and am very happy with it, I used to use Pro Tools and before that Cakewalk.

 

I have Reaper as well, but just got a copy of Harrison's MixBus (built around Ardour). It has a nice analog feel and sound. I like the workflow. I would like to get the newest version of Ardour when it's released (4.x), if I can get a Linux box set up for it. Not enough time, not enough money and at this point it's more of a hobby.

 

I like real mixers too, but being more of a hobby, I can't leave something set up in a dedicated room. :wacko:

 

Bruce

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I'm not familiar with Mixbus nor Ardour. I record and mix mostly as a hobby, but lately I've been getting actual paying clients. The same thing happened with tube guitar amp repairs and builds. Initially, I was only gonna work on vintage Marshall's, I know them best and have built a few clones for myself. A friend needed his Blackstar amp repaired, so I did it, he told others and the next thing I know I have four to six in line for repair pretty regularly, Fender and Marshall mostly. I guess good work speaks for itself, but I don't want this to become WORK, that would ruin the enjoyment for me. I don't take every job that comes along, sometimes I can tell that a potential client is going to be a pain, based on initial discussions, or that the gear sucks to work on. Same goes for recording. When I retired five years ago, I decided that anything I do is going to be enjoyable and worthwhile to me, money be damned, otherwise forget it. The biggest problem for me is having time to play with my gear, Hi Fi, guitar, etc.

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I bought my first Martin while still in high school, and the bridge started coming loose. I called this old guy, worked out of his home. He asked what I had, soon as I told him, he said absolutely he would work on it. He said he had to be careful, as he had folks bring him guitars that were little better than cardboard.

He was really good, worked on read Strads... Was actually a violin maker who did other instrument on the side. He wad very, very good and quite generous with this skinny highschool kid.

Bruce

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I bought my first Martin while still in high school, and the bridge started coming loose. I called this old guy, worked out of his home. He asked what I had, soon as I told him, he said absolutely he would work on it. He said he had to be careful, as he had folks bring him guitars that were little better than cardboard.

He was really good, worked on read Strads... Was actually a violin maker who did other instrument on the side. He wad very, very good and quite generous with this skinny highschool kid.

Bruce

I love those guys, real craftsmen, and what I try to model myself after. I've known some great TV/HiFi repair guys from back when tubes ruled, as well as a few luthiers. They all basically told me, "Never take a job for the money, take it because you do it well and will succeed. Failure is easy, success is hard work."

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