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Texas Beef Brisket


jimjimbo
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sometimes i wish we were all located in the same place…a cook-off would be fun.  I’d have to be a judge; because, i can’t cook worth a crap.

Well, guess what?  Come to Hope in the spring, and lots of us will be!!  And, you won't have to cook!!

 

sometimes it does sound like it would be fun.  it’s weird knowing a lot about many forum folks and never having met them.

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sometimes i wish we were all located in the same place…a cook-off would be fun.  I’d have to be a judge; because, i can’t cook worth a crap.

Well, guess what?  Come to Hope in the spring, and lots of us will be!!  And, you won't have to cook!!

 

sometimes it does sound like it would be fun.  it’s weird knowing a lot about many forum folks and never having met them.

 

Thinking I Might make my way to Hope next spring....Not sure at this point....Life, sometimes gets in the way of planned intentions....

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JL Sargent, on 08 Oct 2015 - 7:56 PM, said:JL Sargent, on 08 Oct 2015 - 7:56 PM, said:

I rub with only salt & pepper. Fat side up and smoke for 14hrs in a pellet smoker I built using 100% hickory pellets until internal meat temp is 200F. It's awesome every time! 

 

 

Pellets or logs, just salt and pepper or a little more, I do the same as you. Your lucky I am not your neighbor I would sneak over at about 13 hours and rip off a little piece and run off like a rat. :lol:

 

I was sitting here reading eating some pork butt I cooked the other day, not brisket but really good. 

Edited by dtel
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I have a Primo Grill Oval, like a Big Green Egg. I haven't done brisket in quite some time, but I recall, injection, rub, low and slow and texas crutch.

I based my methods on information from this site.

http://amazingribs.com/recipes/beef/texas_brisket.html

There is a taco place in Austin, they cook all their meat in Green Eggs, and it is some of the best meat I have ever had. Everyone I know who has one, even long time Texas Smoker owners, swear by em.

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dwilawyer, on 08 Oct 2015 - 7:52 PM, said:

Ask Aaron Franklin, 4 hour wait in line, and it is well worth it.

You can google him and he has videos with other bbq guys on how to do it. He uses grass fed beef.

 

That place is legendary, it has been in the news lately because they stopped line holders, people who just wait in line and have a bunch of orders for others. 

 

If I ever find myself anywhere close I would love to go, I once though about a trip planned around all the great smokehouses in Texas, it would be great.

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dwilawyer, on 08 Oct 2015 - 7:52 PM, said:

Ask Aaron Franklin, 4 hour wait in line, and it is well worth it.

You can google him and he has videos with other bbq guys on how to do it. He uses grass fed beef.

That place is legendary, it has been in the news lately because they stopped line holders, people who just wait in line and have a bunch of orders for others.

If I ever find myself anywhere close I would love to go, I once though about a trip planned around all the great smokehouses in Texas, it would be great.

Be sure you end there. Come on down, we will get in line at 7 am and drink 11 when they open and do it up.

http://www.foodandwine.com/articles/crimes-against-bbq-brisket-aaron-franklin

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Wagyu....for real high end competitions, sure, but for the normal dude that knows his way around a smoker and grill, and just wants to put a really good brisket on the table on a Saturday or Sunday evening....I think it's a bit of overkill.

 

USDA Choice and/or Angus for the weekend warrior, IMHO.

I go for grass-fed Alberta Beef. I can buy it when I'm visiting Montana for ~ 1/4th of the per lb price here. 

 

This is my favorite Alberta....

 

https://youtu.be/JF6wEKtzCdQ

 

Mine was named after this one: http://calgaryherald.com/news/local-news/5-things-about-queen-victorias-rebel-daughter-albertas-namesake-princess

 

As was the town of Caroline Alberta, the large Caroline, Alberta Gas Field, Lake Louise Alberta and at least four different regiments in both the Royal Canadian Army & Canadian Army in the last 150 years.  :)

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Confession:  I don't think I've ever had a brisket.  (if I have, I was unaware)

 

What does a brisket do for me that a thick cut NY strip doesn't?

 

A NY strip - nay, any steak - cannot hold a candle to brisket when it comes out right.  Brisket has better marbling, and when it has what we Texans call "a little bark" on it, it simply cannot be beat.  Done right, it will melt in your mouth unlike any other steak, which is simply a second-rate impostor and brisket wanna-be.

 

Texas-style smoked BBQ is not well-known in the East from what I have heard, but they are finding out how good it is over there, and slowly, our meat prices are being driven up. Dang Yankees!

 

Seriously, go find a good Texas-style BBQ place.  There must be one near you.

Edited by Jeff Matthews
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There's a place here locally called West TX BBQ.  They have a smoke house building next to the restaurant.  There's always smoke billowing out of the screened windows.  Their brisket is to die for.  Right before they serve it they slice the fat side off and you never get a speck of fat.  It's incredible.  I believe they use mesquite to smoke with.  It's an old building with wood plank floors that's been in TX monthly magazine.  I always bring out of town company there. 

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There's a place here locally called West TX BBQ.  They have a smoke house building next to the restaurant.  There's always smoke billowing out of the screened windows.  Their brisket is to die for.  Right before they serve it they slice the fat side off and you never get a speck of fat.  It's incredible.  I believe they use mesquite to smoke with.  It's an old building with wood plank floors that's been in TX monthly magazine.  I always bring out of town company there.

That sounds really good Carl.......I could be "out of town company"....

MKP :-)

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If you want to try, then salt and pepper rub, and put it in an offset smoker (most often oak here in Texas), then cook it for 10 to 14 hours at 225°-250°F... And unless you have a lot of practice you’ll fail more often than not.

Texas brisket is never brined, never cooked in an oven, NEVER cooked in liquid (that's pot roast) and any mention of using liquid smoke might just get you shot.

Texas brisket vs a NYC strip is like comparing a Forte to a Jubilee... They're both beef, but one is an order of magnitude better.

If you're ever in Texas, any of the places in the Texas Monthly Top 50 will convince you of the merits of Texas brisket... Particularly those in the top 10. Of course there's also pork ribs, sausage, beef ribs, Turkey, pulled pork, pork chops, etc.

http://www.texasmonthly.com/list/the-50-best-bbq-joints-in-the-world/

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As a Texan living in VT I do a lot of smoking.  I use a propane smoker and follow many of the recommendations already listed.  Getting a good quality brisket is step one, I do not marinade nor inject.  I make a really nice basic rub and thoroughly coat the brisket and then wrap it in plastic wrap and let it sit a day.  I combine wood chips because as stated straight mesquite can be a bit harsh so blend it with pecan, oak or hickory.  Stubbs or Jack Daniels wood barrel stave pieces work great.  I have to refresh my wood box at least twice, but low and slow is the key.  I also have a water pan that I usually put sliced apples and oranges in for steam essence.  I also rest mine after it comes out of the smoker to seal in the moisture, then serve with grilled baked potatoes or sweet corn.

 

I do pork butts, shoulders, chickens, flat irons, lamb chops, salmon, catfish, duck, cornish hens you name it.  I keep about ten different wood types on hand depending on what I am smoking.  The smoker is so well seasoned on a warm day you would swear it is running. 

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