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jimjimbo

Texas Beef Brisket

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sometimes it does sound like it would be fun

 

Sometimes?????  We need to talk it up more then.

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My personal recipe that has won a dozen or so local competitions.....

 

I trim all fat to about 1/4" then  brine mine in a beef broth, salt, sugar, rub and water ice brine for 10-12 hours.....take out and dry......light mustard coating and then pack on the dry rub....let it come to room temp

 

Get smoker to 200-225 over lump charcoal and oak or pecan.....these are my preferred hard woods since they are abundantly available locally and also burn slow and even without any bitterness like mesquite. My rule of thumb is about 1 hour per pound in the smoker....but this is just a "guideline"....what I watch most is the internal temp of the brisket.

 

Where most people kinda freak out is the "stall"...brisket will get to about 165-170* and just sit there for a while...people tend to freak out and start increasing the temp to try to get past it....DO NOT DO THIS.....it will stall for a good 1-2 hour.....just keep steady and it ill eventually get past the stall with even heat.

 

I usually wrap my brisket in foil with a little bit of beef broth and apple juice when the stall starts and then pull it off the smoker when it hits 200*. Let it rest for about 30-45 minutes and then slice it thin.

 

Good Luck!! Of all the cuts of meat that I've worked with....brisket is by far the most difficult to master on the smoker.

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  1. Offset firebox, brick-lined smoker.
  2. Oak w/some hickory.
  3. Salt and pepper rub (sometimes with a pinch of cayenne).
  4. Fat side up.
  5. 185-220F.
  6. 30 minutes per pound (approximately).
  7. One can of beer per hour for heat control (used internally).

 

If you are coming to Central Texas anytime, these are the places I highly recommend you visit. I'm big on tradition, not so big on neu-b-que.

Edited by pmsummer
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I've been eatin Brisket and butt leftovers all week. I grew up in MI and IN, never heard of Brisket. Moved to TEXAS and bought a bb samich, got brisket and it blowed my mind. I moved back to IN 20 xx years ago, turned friends on to Brisket, now its a regular. Its no big deal to cook, just a few rules. You need a good pc of meat, not too much fat, it so trim to 1/4 to 1/2 inch, I just don't like to buy the fat so Kroger beats Sams easily here. I marinade for several hrs to overnight in different types, personal preference. I rub in Kosher salt, cracked pepper, a little basil, paprika and spec of adolfs tenderizer, just cause I loved it as a kid on burgers.

 

  Fire up the smoker, side box type for me. I start with charcoal then put on Mesquite that's soaked a few hrs (after charcoal turns white)along with some dry. After I'm up to 250 or so I toss the meat right on the rack close to stack fat side up. I cook a few hrs like that then flip to fat side up for several more hrs all at about 225. Then I remove and wrap in heavy foil, 2 layers, add some broth from drip pan. Then continue at 200 to 225 for many hrs. All together for a couple 10 lb or so Briskets I cook about 16hrs. I always have people comment on how amazing a Brisket taste and how tender and juicy it is.

 

I'm no pro but common sense, patience has a lot to do with it, and a few tips from the old TX guys. The only Brisket that beats mine (to me) is the old Texas guys that I grew to love. What is sold at Arby's or even local places here is an abomination, imo. Try it, you'll like it, Happy eatin.

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There's some good sounding advice on this thread guys ...thanks. I'm no stranger to smoking meat, especially pork, but a beef brisket has always seemed a little intimidating, especially after some of the dry, nasty stuff served in most restaurants. Maybe I'll give it a shot.

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KFC down on the corner has BBQ chicken…just thought you guys might like to know.

Don't forget the McRib sandwich at Mickey D's.

 

Now we're talking real BBQ. Is Ronald McDonald feared in Texas?   :D

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KFC down on the corner has BBQ chicken…just thought you guys might like to know.

Well I can understand your desire for KFC BBQ after having to eat NC BBQ all those years.

 

 

BBQ'ing is not smoking. Its Grilling.

 

see how little i know about this stuff...i read menus and tell the waiter what i want.

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Major score today!!  Went shopping for my brisket to smoke this weekend, stopped at Costco first to see what they had....USDA Prime whole brisket, $3.69 per pound!  Now, that's not closely trimmed, but I thought  it was still a really good price for prime beef.  And, I did the wiggle test.....got lots of funny looks.....but hey, it worked.  Going to put it on this Sunday, weather is supposed to be very nice, mid 70's, should be a beautiful fall day.

Edited by jimjimbo
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And, I did the wiggle test.....got lots of funny looks
did any old ladies tell you not to play with your food? 

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KFC down on the corner has BBQ chicken…just thought you guys might like to know.

Don't forget the McRib sandwich at Mickey D's.

I used to love those, but now I am wondering what the heck it is.

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<p>

  • Offset firebox, brick-lined smoker.
  • Oak w/some hickory.
  • Salt and pepper rub (sometimes with a pinch of cayenne).
  • Fat side up.
  • 185-220F.
  • 30 minutes per pound (approximately).
  • One can of beer per hour for heat control (used internally).

If you are coming to Central Texas anytime, these are the places I highly recommend you visit. I'm big on tradition, not so big on neu-b-que.

Those are all great. I would add that one of the Muller's has a place in Austin that is rated No. 2 on a lot of lists. I prefer Smitty's but if you his Lockhart you might as well go to em all.

I would put those all at a 9 or a 10. There is ine in Belton that is as good as any of those.

But Franklin is in his own league. I never thought any BBQ was going to be worth a 3 hour wait, boy was I wrong.

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Major score today!!  Went shopping for my brisket to smoke this weekend, stopped at Costco first to see what they had....USDA Prime whole brisket, $3.69 per pound!  Now, that's not closely trimmed, but I thought  it was still a really good price for prime beef.  And, I did the wiggle test.....got lots of funny looks.....but hey, it worked.  Going to put it on this Sunday, weather is supposed to be very nice, mid 70's, should be a beautiful fall day.

Have an awesome Sunday with a great piece of Meat

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My personal recipe that has won a dozen or so local competitions.....

 

I trim all fat to about 1/4" then  brine mine in a beef broth, salt, sugar, rub and water ice brine for 10-12 hours.....take out and dry......light mustard coating and then pack on the dry rub....let it come to room temp

 

Get smoker to 200-225 over lump charcoal and oak or pecan.....these are my preferred hard woods since they are abundantly available locally and also burn slow and even without any bitterness like mesquite. My rule of thumb is about 1 hour per pound in the smoker....but this is just a "guideline"....what I watch most is the internal temp of the brisket.

 

Where most people kinda freak out is the "stall"...brisket will get to about 165-170* and just sit there for a while...people tend to freak out and start increasing the temp to try to get past it....DO NOT DO THIS.....it will stall for a good 1-2 hour.....just keep steady and it ill eventually get past the stall with even heat.

 

I usually wrap my brisket in foil with a little bit of beef broth and apple juice when the stall starts and then pull it off the smoker when it hits 200*. Let it rest for about 30-45 minutes and then slice it thin.

 

Good Luck!! Of all the cuts of meat that I've worked with....brisket is by far the most difficult to master on the smoker.

This one............   monitor the internal temps.  It'll take awhile.  But follow this recipe and it'll be good 100% of the time.  You can vary the spice mixes and preps.

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KFC down on the corner has BBQ chicken…just thought you guys might like to know.

Don't forget the McRib sandwich at Mickey D's.

 

 

Yes, made with nothing but the the finest dry-aged Soylent Green.  ;)

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KFC down on the corner has BBQ chicken…just thought you guys might like to know.

Don't forget the McRib sandwich at Mickey D's.

 

Now we're talking real BBQ. Is Ronald McDonald feared in Texas?   :D

 

I don't know about Texas but seeing he's a Clown he scares the Heck out of me.

 

Always remember: John Wayne Gacey was a Clown.

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Wolfbane...you'd better not watch this you tube clip that i saw once...MCSabbath...it's a black sabbath cover band; but, all the musicians dress like mcdonalds characters....Ronald is the lead singer, then theres the hamburgler, etc...

the only one with any legitmate credibility is mayor mccheese...i mean, he's a mayor.

Edited by BigStewMan
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Wolfbane...you'd better not watch this you tube clip that i saw once...MCSabbath...it's a black sabbath cover band; but, all the musicians dress like mcdonalds characters....Ronald is the lead singer, then theres the hamburgler, etc...

the only one with any legitmate credibility is mayor mccheese...i mean, he's a mayor.

Uncle Buck (aka John Candy) knew how to deal with clowns.

 

Especially when they slow up at the door having driven drunk in their little mouse-car to your nephew's kid birthday party.  :emotion-22:

 

Classic!!  :)

Edited by Wolfbane

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<p>

  • Offset firebox, brick-lined smoker.
  • Oak w/some hickory.
  • Salt and pepper rub (sometimes with a pinch of cayenne).
  • Fat side up.
  • 185-220F.
  • 30 minutes per pound (approximately).
  • One can of beer per hour for heat control (used internally).

If you are coming to Central Texas anytime, these are the places I highly recommend you visit. I'm big on tradition, not so big on neu-b-que.

Those are all great. I would add that one of the Muller's has a place in Austin that is rated No. 2 on a lot of lists. I prefer Smitty's but if you his Lockhart you might as well go to em all.

I would put those all at a 9 or a 10. There is ine in Belton that is as good as any of those.

But Franklin is in his own league. I never thought any BBQ was going to be worth a 3 hour wait, boy was I wrong.

 

 

In Belton, it's Miller's Smokehouse, which used to do taxidermy and bbq.

I must have hit Franklin's on an off day. Very good and on par with the best, but ultimately I didn't find it worth the wait. I've never gone back.

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