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Black Satin Paint for KG Series


toolz
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Not sure how well you will be able to "match" the original finish.  I would suggest to tape off and lightly sand the entire cabinet. I have never used it on speakers before but of the MANY other projects, my go to is most always Rust-Oleum enamel (spray).  It dries fast and hard.  About 10 very light coats and it is unbeatable.  Provides an excellent, protective surface and looks very nice.

 

Matt ♪ ♫ ♪

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I took a speaker in to Sherwin Williams and they helped me pick a durable one coat finish. I prepped the speakers with a scotch pad and ammonia, removed drivers and horns, masked parts I didn't want painted, spray painted the screws stuck in cardboard separately and rolled the finish on the cabinets with a roller they recommended. All together, I restored 50 speakers using this method. The metal grilles got scotch pad, de-greased and spray painted. 

 

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Note: This method will cover wood grain. The speakers I restored were KPT's.

Edited by mustang guy
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Matthews and Mustang Guy thanks for the ideas. I need to rethink my plan of attack on these cabinets due to the flaking issue. It is worse than I thought and will not provide a good base to paint over.

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Interesting. Is there anything not made with soy today? Seriously, looks like a good idea. In trying to clean off the paint, I need to be careful of the thin plastic finish on the face and back of the cabinets. A caustic stripper most likely would damage the plastic.

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Interesting. Is there anything not made with soy today? Seriously, looks like a good idea. In trying to clean off the paint, I need to be careful of the thin plastic finish on the face and back of the cabinets. A caustic stripper most likely would damage the plastic.

You can test that out. I will say this. The stuff is good, and it goes a long way. It doesn't stink or burn your skin. It's actually hard to believe it removes paint as tame as it seems to be.

 

I use brake fluid to remove paint when I want something extremely weak. It takes over night and even then only a layer. A scotch pad with brake fluid is a good way to remove paint from wire shielding. It did this on a 66 Beetle I restored. All the wires were painted black. With brake fluid, a scotch pad and elbow grease, I got the colors to pop out.

 

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Edited by mustang guy
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Somewhere in the forum there are several mentions of black satin #40 and it's a common brand but it escapes me for the moment.  That would be for the original look.  Previous suggestions here are great for a more durable finish.

Just remembered, it's ValSpar.

Edited by oldtimer
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Just remembered, it's ValSpar.
It's in Groomie's PDFs posted at the top of the 2 Channel section:

 

8. "Lacquer" refers to the application of one or two thin coats of a clear semi-gloss lacquer sprayed on the cabinet and motor board prior to installation of drivers. That lacquer was obtained from various vendors, and as of 2013, is a
#40 sheen, semi-gloss lacquer from Valspar/OPEC. Lacquer finishes only require a routine wiping off with a clean dry cloth to maintain the finish.
9. For "Black Lacquer" finishes, the factory used a flat black lacquer primer, then #40 sheen black lacquer, with a clear #40 sheen to protect the black finish

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Just remembered, it's ValSpar.
It's in Groomie's PDFs posted at the top of the 2 Channel section:

 

8. "Lacquer" refers to the application of one or two thin coats of a clear semi-gloss lacquer sprayed on the cabinet and motor board prior to installation of drivers. That lacquer was obtained from various vendors, and as of 2013, is a

#40 sheen, semi-gloss lacquer from Valspar/OPEC. Lacquer finishes only require a routine wiping off with a clean dry cloth to maintain the finish.

9. For "Black Lacquer" finishes, the factory used a flat black lacquer primer, then #40 sheen black lacquer, with a clear #40 sheen to protect the black finish

 

 

Any idea if this also applied to the black paint used on the Professional line?

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I can second Mustang Guy's suggestion. I have 4 of his finished products in my media room. I would also suggest to try to find something that is water-based since it is easier to clean up. I've refinished a lot of speakers and black is the easiest to repair.

Edited by japosey
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Started to work on the KG.  As always not what was expected.  The paint is flaking because the veneer is buckling and lifting off of the mdf.  Looks like a prolonged moisture issue.  Need to rethink the project again.   

Edited by toolz
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Any idea if this also applied to the black paint used on the Professional line?
Marshall updated his info and it's in a single PDF you can download, It's pinned to the top of the Two Channel forums.

 

I don't know about the pro models, perhaps Colter would know. A lot of companies use DuraTex, by Acry-Tech Coatings.

 

Bruce

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