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jason str

Buy a Chevrolet

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I like Chevy's but what kind of idiot would ever load a bed like that anyhow?   These are pick ups, not dump trucks.  A drop in bedliner would have taken that abuse and saved both beds.

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I like Chevy's but what kind of idiot would ever load a bed like that anyhow?

 

I've seen lots of work trucks that are beaten to death by employees of construction companies. 

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I like Chevy's but what kind of idiot would ever load a bed like that anyhow?

 

I've seen lots of work trucks that are beaten to death by employees of construction companies. 

 

 

 

Well, you answered my question.

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Well, you answered my question.

 

But you're right that no one would load their personal vehicle like that. 

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If the bed were made of polyethylene there would be no dents, maybe some abrasions. And no visible paint chips because the color is all the way through the material. You could then load it like a total A-hole.

JJK

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Never load anything heavier than a case of beer over bed rails as it is too easy to scratch up the sides of your truck!  For what trucks cost I want it to work and look great.  I have had two Chevy Silverado 2500 LTZ 4 x 4 trucks totaling just under 400,000 miles and I will buy another for sure.  Never had a mechanical problem ever.

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If the bed were made of polyethylene there would be no dents, maybe some abrasions. And no visible paint chips because the color is all the way through the material. You could then load it like a total A-hole.

JJK

 

LDPE can indeed crack in very cold winter temps.  Case in point are those orange road barrel barriers.  The upper midwest winters will have several -10 degree days and many at near zero.  I would not trust anything other than steel.

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What's interesting is that Chevy is considering aluminum bodies in the future as well. 

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If the bed were made of polyethylene there would be no dents, maybe some abrasions. And no visible paint chips because the color is all the way through the material. You could then load it like a total A-hole.

JJK

 

LDPE can indeed crack in very cold winter temps.  Case in point are those orange road barrel barriers.  The upper midwest winters will have several -10 degree days and many at near zero.  I would not trust anything other than steel.

 

 

The rubber blended with polyethylene ones seem to really hold up well and are very durable.

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GM has been using aluminum body panels for some time now, they just had enough common sense not to use it in the truck bed where it gets the most use and abuse.

 

Bed liners do protect but only to a point, load a heavy item like a freezer or motorcycle on a center stand and see what happens to an aluminum bed liner or not.

 

As for loading maybe the average owner wants to keep the vehicle clean for as long as possible but for those who really work their truck every day  know after working a long day things do just get thrown in.

 

Anybody own a aluminum Snap On or Mac tool box ?

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We had a silverado with a quality Spray on Lining and dumped everything from gravel to loading pallets into it and it never once scratched or dug through into the paint. That being said, if you ever put gravel or bark etc into a pickup, always put a tarp down first so you can grab the corners and funnel the last remaining part of the load toward the tailgate and save a bunch of time not having to dig it out.

 

This is what your are supposed to do with your work truck:

 

Edited by twk123

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..... and see the USA......

 

Yea I'm old.

Edited by babadono

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Anybody own a aluminum Snap On or Mac tool box ?

 

Snap on and Mac don't need to worry about CAFE numbers or you might.

 

All these light weight components are a direct result of government imposed fuel economy mandates.  I remember the first time I saw an aluminum control arm on a truck.  I didn't think they would ever hold up.  Unless they're exposed to impact, they hold up just as well as the steel ones.  You can't beat them with a hammer to release parts bolted to them but structurally they're sound and will last the service life of the vehicle and outlast their bushings.

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Anybody own a aluminum Snap On or Mac tool box ?

 

Snap on and Mac don't need to worry about CAFE numbers or you might.

 

All these light weight components are a direct result of government imposed fuel economy mandates.  I remember the first time I saw an aluminum control arm on a truck.  I didn't think they would ever hold up.  Unless they're exposed to impact, they hold up just as well as the steel ones.  You can't beat them with a hammer to release parts bolted to them but structurally they're sound and will last the service life of the vehicle and outlast their bushings.

 

 

I thought the same thing about the aluminum control arm when i saw them but there is a big difference between sheet stock and structural components.

 

Bushings are a wear component, control arms are not. They should last the lifetime of the vehicle.

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Anybody own a aluminum Snap On or Mac tool box ?

 

Snap on and Mac don't need to worry about CAFE numbers or you might.

 

All these light weight components are a direct result of government imposed fuel economy mandates.  I remember the first time I saw an aluminum control arm on a truck.  I didn't think they would ever hold up.  Unless they're exposed to impact, they hold up just as well as the steel ones.  You can't beat them with a hammer to release parts bolted to them but structurally they're sound and will last the service life of the vehicle and outlast their bushings.

 

 

This reminds me of Carbon Fiber. Structurally the material is extremely strong but if it is impacted by something and chipped then the part is extremely compromised. 

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Chevy is tougher than a Ford, and both are tougher than a Dodge. 

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Chevy is tougher than a Ford, and both are tougher than a Dodge. 

 

 

Here we go.  The automotive equivalent of Tubes vs Solid State

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