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AJG395

Vintage Receiver Cleaning

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Hi everyone

 

My name is Austin and I am new to the forums.  I recently purchased a pair of Cherry RP-160m bookshelf speakers for my apartment this summer.  I also found a Pioneer SX-880 receiver to power them.  I'm looking to get the receiver cleaned internally and wanted opinions on some good experiences with certain business in the area. I don't have the time to do it myself and want it done right.   I am in Lincoln, Nebraska for the summer if anyone has some suggestions.  

 

Thanks!

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Takes less time to clean it yourself than packing and shipping or driving to a repair shop and wait on the waiting list for who knows how long to get it back.

 

A can of Deoxit, a few screws, and a few minutes of your time is all you need.

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Welcome to the forum. +1 on what Jason said. A can of compressed dry air for the circuit areas and the Deoxit in the controls such as volume, balance, selectors, etc... 

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Thanks, guys.  I appreciate the feedback. Ruining something inside was another concern of mine.  The volume pot is not too scratchy, just plenty of dust and grime in its lifetime. 

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Purchase the Deoxit D5.  Remove the receiver cover and spray switches from the inside.  Spray lightly, rotate switches back and forth several times, Let it sit for a few minutes, spray again, and rotate switches again.  You can pack some paper towels under the switches to absorb excess.  Deoxit does not evaporate immediately, so I always let it dry overnight.

 

http://www.parts-express.com/caig-d5s-6p-deoxit-d5-spray-with-perfect-straw-5-oz-60th-anniversary--341-201

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Keep screws in a cup. If you have different screws, have different cups. Remove knobs and remove face. Check lights and replace burnt out ones. There are LED lights available if you are interested in going that route.  Clean knobs, face, glass, and behind glass. Take your time, and be fastidious. You will be glad you did.............

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If you take your time, you can perform miracles. Here is an old Fisher I did. 

 

Before:

IMG_0770.jpg

 

After:

IMG_0804.jpg

 

I have done this with lots of different units, but this was the most drastic restoration.

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If you take your time, you can perform miracles. Here is an old Fisher I did.

Before:

IMG_0770.jpg

After:

IMG_0804.jpg

I have done this with lots of different units, but this was the most drastic restoration.

How did you clean the faceplate? And knobs with rust? And what do you use to clean the circuit boards that are caked with heavy dust? Have an old unit that also could use some cleaning and compressed air isn't doing the job.

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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The Fisher restoration is very sweet, indeed!.

 

Unfortunately no "before" picture but 1um Diamond paste (the good stuff like Buehler MetaDI II) does a nice job polishing the older McIntosh chrome chassis.  This thing was looking dull and had some pitting going on in a number of locations.  50 years can take it's toll. The 1um paste does not really rub the silk-screen down either.   I polished right over it and it held up nicely. 

 

I used billiard cloth and loaded it with a very small dab of paste, worked it into the cloth then went at it.  I stripped the unit down of everything but the trans, autoformers.

 

I used to work at a Mc sales and service center in the late 70s and the new hardware didn't look this nice.

 

 

 

 

post-864-0-99440000-1465856923_thumb.jpg

Edited by John Warren

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I had a very dirty receiver, just took the cover off, sprayed almost half a can of electronic cleaner, wiped of the sticky grime with small pieces of paper towels and tons of q tips, and kept spaying the cleaner, then let it sit for a few days. When I was done it looked brand new and worked as it should.

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I feel the need to share my experience with this.

 

I had a beautiful Pioneer SX 3900. It worked great but was a little dusty. I sprayed it down with some sort of contact cleaner I bought from Radio Shack. Sprayed the hell out of it. got it real good. REAL good. This is gonna be GREAT I said.

 

Plugged it in.....immediately after spraying.

 

 

 

POOF.....#$@%@ spark.....POP...@$#&!  hisssssssss\

 

That was my first stupid move. The second stupid move was just chunking it in the landfill. 

 

Hey this was 20 years ago and I was in my rookie season. I have learned a lot since then.

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I feel the need to share my experience with this.

 

I had a beautiful Pioneer SX 3900. It worked great but was a little dusty. I sprayed it down with some sort of contact cleaner I bought from Radio Shack. Sprayed the hell out of it. got it real good. REAL good. This is gonna be GREAT I said.

 

Plugged it in.....immediately after spraying.

 

 

 

POOF.....#$@%@ spark.....POP...@$#&!  hisssssssss\

 

That was my first stupid move. The second stupid move was just chunking it in the landfill. 

 

Hey this was 20 years ago and I was in my rookie season. I have learned a lot since then.

Sometimes we have to learn the hard way!

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Thanks for all the replies guys. I'm sure some, if not most of you have more experience with this stuff than I have been around (I'm only 20). I have noticed my left channel is a bit louder than my right. This goes for both A/B and all of my inputs minus phono since it's never been used. Could this be due to the oxidation within the pots?

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It could just be the balance knob.  :)  

 

It could also be a bit more serious. Not something you try to fix yourself unless you want to get a degree in electronics. 

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