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Shorthorn discovery in house remodel


MMcCabe
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Attached is the article I mentioned.  The file is a bit large because I had to use grayscale and higher resolution in the scan.  I probably got this off of microfilm at Chicago Public Library.  

 

It is the only technical publication regarding the Shorthorn / Rebel series of which I'm aware. 

 

I like to point out the prices of the bass drivers.  They seem comparable to prices these days but they're in 1955 dollars! 

 

Other components found by McCabe are mentioned.  It's nice when a publication and an artifact match up.  Like finding a papyrus describing the pyramids.  Smile 

 

 

Small_Corner_Horn_Systems.pdf

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WOW!  Two Model T Shorthorns, which are rare or unknown in stereo pairs because they would have been bought in the late 1950's before stereo.  The labels say they both have the same drivers -- the Stephens 103 woofer, the University SAHF mid-driver (a nice, smooth driver, as I recall) in a K-1000 mid horn, and I think a University 4401 tweeter, which Klipsch used prior to the EV T-35.  The M2 was dark mahogany veneer, which might have been painted over, though that looks like the same dark brown paint used on the backs of the veneered Klipsch's of that vintage.  The other, "Raw" was probably a "utility" or decorator" model, suggesting it was bought at a slightly different time perhaps to round out a stereo pair.

 

I think the Model T's were pretty special:  they had much longer bass horns than the more popular Model S, from extending so far out from the corner, and were spec'd down to around 30 Hz, much further into the deep K-horn bass range, than the Model S's higher bass limits.  I had a single T around 1960, and the depth of the bass extension was remarkable.  You could feel deep organ notes.  Those Klipsch back-loaded horns had a very nice sonic continuity between the mid-range from the direct driver in front and the smooth, large-sounding horn bass from the rear. 

 

Of course, they had to be placed in complete corners in order to maximize the bass extension.  The placement of these appears to close off the last stage of the bass horn, which would have shut out the deepest possible bass from these horns

 

I suggest you make the most of this find, at least to hook them up and try them out in K-horn-size corners AND PUT THEM ON THE FLOOR IN THE CORNERS [EDIT].  These old drivers seem to last forever, and that woofer (which I've never heard) was supposed to have been one of the best.

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3 hours ago, JRH said:

The Shorthorn T is probably the 3rd rarest Klipsch production speaker.  As I recall, less than 50 were made. 

 

Where was this installation? 

The installation was near Hutchinson, KS which is about 45 miles NW of Wichita.  Sounds like they are very rare and the fact that they weren't sold in pairs for stereo makes sense why there are 2 different finished and non-sequential serial #s. 

 

I see that there is an auction on ebay selling the same woofer that this model contains.   Not sure if they'll get the $750 asking price, but will watch for sure.

 

http://www.ebay.com/itm/STEPHENS-TRU-SONIC-MODEL-103LX-WOOFER-SPEAKER-SERIAL-7039-EXCELLENT-RARE-USA-/272446802387?hash=item3f6f1849d3:g:BHgAAOSwKOJYJsyK

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On 11/4/2016 at 10:27 AM, Budman said:

the one on the right says the finish is M 2 which stands for Mahogany - light finish      does it really have mahogany veneer ?

the other one is raw

 

 

On 11/5/2016 at 7:09 PM, MMcCabe said:

I don't believe it's mahogany veneer. Looks like it's painted brown. 

 

My guess is that the original grill frame (mahogany) was discarded, or potentially still remains in the attic/basement/closet of that remodel. Worth an ask/look...

 

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On 11/20/2016 at 2:11 PM, MMcCabe said:

Thats what these shorthorns have --- the 103LX2

 

Sorry if I confused anything, here, but I think one of your Shorthorn speakers has the 103LX, and the other has the 103LX2.

 

Please don't part them out for a quick woofer buck, especially without at least offering the complete units for sale here first.

 

FWIW, I think both motor boards have been modified.

 

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It's really hard to tell since it appears that some of the lettering might be missing.  Really doesn't matter because I don't want to take them apart to find out.  They sound really good. I would keep them if I had some place to put them.  Most likely will offer them up for sale as a stereo pair at some point.  Still enjoying listening to them right now. It's pretty cool to find and own something as rare as members have stated. 

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So I finally lugged these out of the garage and down into my basement to the only place in my house where I have 2 corners in the room (you'll notice the green storage tub container by the right speaker covering the return air vent).  One member above recommended this placement...... Oh My!!!!  The bass on these is amazing.  They play so loud and clear, obviously the Klipsch trademark.  It floors me these are 60+ years old and sound this good.  So if any Klipsch fan in the central Kansas area would like a listen, please feel free to get in touch.  Be Happy to demo my Ultra2 7.1 dedicated theater while you're hear.  Happy Thanksgiving all.  I'm thankful for rescuing a pair of shorthorns and the inventions of Paul Klipsch.  

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On Saturday, November 26, 2016 at 4:22 PM, IB Slammin said:

 

Was the LB-76 ever in production?

tc

Yes...but not REGULAR production.  And, very few were sold.  The whole concept was to have a speaker that basically performed like a stage LaScala, but had a smaller foot-print, and was easier on space AND weight...so that more of them could be carried in the same truck/trailer space that LaScalas would take up...for road shows and the like.  The "Little Bastards" were actually MORE expensive to produce than a LaScala, with negligible savings in weight...therefore cost-prohibitive.

 

We would take a pair of the "factory loaner" LB's to the Little Missouri River by Blevins, AR, quite often...set them out on the gravel bar where the river bend is, run some speaker wire back to the door speakers on my 1980 Dodge D-50 Sport pickup, and use alligator clips to attach the speaker wire to the terminals of the door speakers' speaker wire...and rock the river using my in-dash cassette deck!  Keg parties, ice chest parties....lots of people wading or swimming in the river, or floating on inner tubes...and BBQ grills fired up on a lazy summer Saturday afternoon...it doesn't get any better than that!  I could fit two LB's, a LARGE ice chest, and a 55-gallon drum grill into the bed of that truck easily...with room to spare!

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