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What Book Are You Reading?


Wolfbane

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I didn't think I would enjoy or agree with much of this book, but I find his ability to relate his personal experiences and illustrations to be very encouraging and helpful. 

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On 1/9/2022 at 8:23 AM, Woofers and Tweeters said:

Have to admit that I liked Jasper Fforde's Thursday Next books. I haven't read the last two. He has a twisted sense of humor for some light reading.

I just finished the first Thursday Next book. Strange, but very enjoyable read. No more weird than what Christopher More writes and I love those. Thanks for the lead.

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33 minutes ago, CWelsh said:

I just finished the first Thursday Next book. Strange, but very enjoyable read. No more weird than what Christopher More writes and I love those. Thanks for the lead.

You're welcome, glad that you enjoyed it too. I lol the way he twists literature into characters. Thursday Next books are better and makes a lot more sense if the reader has read books by Dickens, Jane Austen and other Classics. 

 

I read a few of Christopher Moore's books. Out of the ones I read, I liked Noir and Practical Demokeeper the best.

 

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5 minutes ago, Woofers and Tweeters said:

I read a few of Christopher Moore's books. Out of the ones I read, I liked Noir and Practical Demokeeper the best.

 

Lamb is one of my all time favorites, but I like most everything Moore has written.

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The Dawn of Everything: A New History of Humanity
Graeber, David (& some other guy -- the book is not in front of me)
 
I started with H.G. Wells Outline of History in elementary school, loved the line drawings showing the relative sizes of Brontosaurus and man, and the treatment by Wells of the "penniless preacher from Nazareth who was the center of history" [quote is approximate], dabbled in Will Durant and Toynbee, and now it is time to look at one more take.
 
From another angle, I read several books on cosmology, most recently The Grand Design by Hawking and Mlodinow, but I still don't really know why there is something rather than nothing.
 
What are we, and what makes the other great apes avoid murder, war and politics more than we do?
 
And, by the way, what is all this?  :blink2:
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8 hours ago, oldtimer said:

Dust in the wind.  All we are is dust in the wind.

 

True, originally stardust.

 

But some do chase the dust in the wind. 

 

"I have seen all the things that are done under the sun; all of them are meaningless, a chasing after the wind ...

I applied myself to the understanding of wisdom, and also of madness and folly, but I learned that this, too, is a chasing after the wind ... "  [Attributed to Solomon c. 940-ish BCE] 

 

And so it goes, until he gets to:  "To every thing there is a season, and a time to every purpose under the heaven: · A time to be born, and a time to die ..."  Etc.

 

And, as we might say today, "Go with the Flow," and "Play it as it Lays."

 

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11 minutes ago, Crankysoldermeister said:

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I assume Boltzmann and Ehrenfest each died passing a perfect gas, and  that the presence of a human observer would have made no difference whatsoever in their state.

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I'm currently reading Douglas Adams "The Salmon of Doubt".  In case someone is not familiar with Adams, he was the author of "The Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy".

 

This is a book pulled together from essays, speeches, musings, and fragments of book ideas by Adams friends and associates after his death. A very unique book from a very unique and brilliant mind presented with Adams typical humility and humor. I highly recommend it.

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I finished The Apollo Murders a couple of weeks ago, and it did not disappoint.  You can occasionally tell that it's a first novel, but it's a great story, well thought out and with lots of unexpected turns.  In the process of reading it, I learned some surprising things about the Russian space program in the 1970s.  Relative to the US program, only the basics reached most Western news agencies, but the info was available, and the author Chris Hadfield knew where to look for it.

 

A number of the characters in the book were actual members of the US and USSR governments and space programs, which makes the story seem more credible.  Highly recommended for fans of science and speculative fiction.  Even if you're not usually a sci-fi reader, but you like action adventure, in the vein of Mission Impossible, this may have everything you look for in a great story.  Highly recommended!  I guess you can tell that I liked it.

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