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Elegy for a really nice mailbox


Chris A
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Never heard of this.  All they want is for it to be a certain height and a certain distance to the curb.  I could sling it from the tree if it met those requirements.  Then again, I live for the most part in the land of the relatively brave and the relatively free.

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Height to the bottom of box is 42", 12' away from curb or road.

I watched a 3 man masonry crew spend 4 days building a very nice brick mailbox/entry column. The home was a multi million dollar place. When I drove by on day 5, all the masonry was gone and a cheap plastic mailbox in it's place, I'd say they didn't get permission. 

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4 minutes ago, Ceptorman said:

Height to the bottom of box is 42", 12' away from curb or road.

I watched a 3 man masonry crew spend 4 days building a very nice brick mailbox/entry column. The home was a multi million dollar place. When I drove by on day 5, all the masonry was gone and a cheap plastic mailbox in it's place, I'd say they didn't get permission. 

It wasn't in Texas, was it?

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Just sayin'.  In my neighborhood we have every kind of installation there is.  The postal workers only complain if the box is not the right height or distance from the curb.  They will put the notice in your mail for violations, and it never mentions masonry, wood, metal, or any other means of complying.  Draw your own conclusions if it really is the "law" that is going on.

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I may be wrong, but I think assaulting a mailbox is a federal offense. In any case, any lawsuit should be considered frivolous and dropped. In Indiana I think such an assault on one's property is criminal

mischievous ...

 

Another thing to consider. Without good sturdy mailbox, the vehicularassault weapon may end up in one' home....

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Years ago someone developed a grudge against my father's mailbox.  After several hits, he decided to put the wooden post in a large metal milk can, which was then filled with gravel.  A hand truck was needed to take it to the road in the morning and return it to the garage at night.  

 

The postal service gave him a notice that they would not deliver to the mailbox if it was not permanently installed at the road.  Understand, without the hand truck it was difficult to even budge the heavy milk can containing the post and mailbox.  Between the weight and the large diameter of the milk can, it was very stable, but not "permanent" enough to suit the post office.

 

The regulations and policies enforced seem to vary by locality, postal carrier and whether or not there are sun spots.

 

As far as opening yourself up to liability, anyone can sue anyone for the cost of a filing fee.  Don't live your life in fear of lawsuits by crazy people.

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10 minutes ago, oldtimer said:

Just sayin'.  In my neighborhood we have every kind of installation there is.  The postal workers only complain if the box is not the right height or distance from the curb.  They will put the notice in your mail for violations, and it never mentions masonry, wood, metal, or any other means of complying.  Draw your own conclusions if it really is the "law" that is going on.

 

My Dad's neighbor built a metal mailbox shaped like a pig, you pulled his tail to open the door. The mailman complained but nothing came out of it.

 

11 minutes ago, oldtimer said:

 

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4 minutes ago, BLSamuel said:

Yes. The federal guberment thinks not, however, most real Texans IMVMHO think they are still The Republic of Texas.... Don'y mess with Texas.

 

From the US Postal Service website....

 

Installing the Post

The best mailbox supports are stable but bend or fall away if a car hits them. The Federal Highway Administration recommends:

  • A 4" x 4" wooden support or a 2"-diameter standard steel or aluminum pipe.
  • Avoid unyielding and potentially dangerous supports, like heavy metal pipes, concrete posts, and farm equipment (e.g., milk cans filled with concrete).
  • Bury your post no more than 24" deep.
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