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Joe Bentes

Subwoofer Cross-Over Setting

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Hi there,

 

Got a question on Sub cross-over settings.  My receiver Denon AVR x3300w lets me assign the cross-over frequency for the sub.  Now reading the spec sheet, the sub says its rated for 120Hz, however, when I look at the back of the sub it says 150Hz.  My receiver can go from 40 - 250Hz.  Want to know what is the SW-110 rated for, 120Hz as noted on the spec sheet or 150Hz as on the back of the panel.  

 

Thanks

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Hi Joe,

 

I think you are supposed to set this frequency to your personal preference.  My advice would be to turn off the crossover in your receiver and to set the crossover of the sub to your personal taste.  If you turn them both on you get two crossovers in series, which is not such a fine thing.  

 

80 Hz would be a good figure to start with (this is THX reference)  If you use big floorstanders as mains, you'll probably like it more in the 50 's region.

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The sub crossover should be turned up to the highest possible setting when you are letting the AVR handle the crossover.

By setting it to the max (150hz, or LFE sometimes), this let's the AVR control things, and doesn't limit the subs output at a particular point.

 

So all the crossover duty is handled by the Denon.  The setting knob on the sub is maxed so that the AVR can do what it wants with the sub.  The sub is still protected because it's own crossover setting is still engaged at 150hz, but won't come into play because the AVR will cross it lower than that.

 

Where you should cross your sub on the AVR is not simply where Audyssey picks, that is actually showing you the LOWEST possible crossover setting.

Almost everyone likes a setting in the 80-100hz range, and some go as low as 40hz and a few as high as 120, 150 or even 200 (rare).  

 

To know what is "best", one must either use their ears, a measurement microphone, or both :) 

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@joopThe manual for the sub says to set the sub to bypass by turning it all the way to the cross over max setting, and set the cross over point on the receiver.  That's how to setup the cross over point on the receiver... its how I've read how most sub/receivers work in setting up proper LFE.  Your suggestion would be the opposite.  

 

My question is which specification is the correct, the manual which states the sub is capable of up to 120Hz or the back of the receiver that states 150HZ.  Just want to make sure I'm setting things up properly.

Edited by Joe Bentes
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2 minutes ago, Joe Bentes said:

The manual for the sub says to set the sub to bypass by turning it all the way to the cross over max setting, and set the cross over point on the receiver.  That's how to setup the cross over point on the receiver... its how I've read how most sub/receivers work in setting up proper LFE.  Your suggestion would be the opposite.  

 

My question is which specification is the correct, the manual which states the sub is capable of up to 120Hz or the back of the receiver that states 150HZ.  Just want to make sure I'm setting things up properly.

What you just said...and what I just wrote, is correct.

 

Max out the crossover on the subwoofer because the Denon is handling it.

The setting on the back of the sub is only for situations where you don't have an AVR handling the crossover.   There are no benefits at all to setting it any lower than maxed. 

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@RoboKlipsch That's exactly how I setup my sub/receiver.  I guess the confusion is the manual says one Hz range, and the actual sub says something else.  I like to do my calibration manually, I haven't had a chance to use Audessey yet, but eventually will.  The cross over LFE Hz range is just being asked by the receiver so, I'm just trying to figure out what is the max setting the sub can take.  

 

I usually use 60Hz - 80Hz since I have RF-82, RC-52, RS-52.  The RF-82s are rated as low as 33Hz, to which I just use full tower rather than small so all of the spectrum is used.  I'll set the others as small and mark them as 60Hz since they're capable of it.  Since my receiver is new (picked it up a few days ago) haven't really gone through a full calibration, just size and distance.  So far, WOW!  Way better than my old Yamaha RXV 675.  Was just disapointed with that old receiver and couldn't find out why.  Apparently, my system was under-powered.  The Yamaha was rated for only 90W @ 8ohm front channel.  The Denon is 105W.  So much better power.  If I were to really get what my speakers can have, I'd be looking at $2k - $3k for a receiver and I just don't have that kind funding lol.  I'll just get an external amp if I feel that I need more power.

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24 minutes ago, Joe Bentes said:

Your suggestion would be the opposite.  

IMHO you can run them both ways.  I'd suggest to try it out, and find out which sounds best for yourself.  I don't know about the Denon, but my experience is that the crossovers used in AVR's are not on the same level as the ones used in active subwoofers.

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The manual is likely telling you what the usable range of the sub is, say 35hz - 150hz, and you maybe have a crossover knob allowing you to manually set a crossover between 40 and 120...that is sometimes how they put it in the manual.  

 

There are some issues you likely know about if you choose to run the fronts full range (large), when you do the sub is not involved with those channels.  Which is fine, if you know that.  Many people like this.  

 

I'm interested to hear how you like Audyssey when you get to it.  Excellent system and great to hear the new AVR is rocking.  It's not just all about watts either, some are just better components and quality.  I have a Denon and am amazed how good it is.  I had no idea and kind of bought it on a whim when a dude was selling locally through ebay.  Turned out to be a great AVR.  

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joop think of it this way --

 

the subwoofer crossover is an absolute point at which there is rolloff.  At 150hz, it is rolling off and doing so steeply, for example.

the avr crossover is also having a very steep roll-off set at whatever number it may be.

 

If the avr were set to 80hz, but the sub was at 60hz, there would be a GAP in there, where between 60 and 80hz, there is a dead spot.  Crossovers from avrs (and subs) are typically very steep to better integrate, so that would be a situation with a big issue.  Likewise if both were set to 80hz, you would have the AVR creating a crossover for the subwoofer, and also the sub itself...doubling the crossover and having it fall off too fast.  There are risks to what you are suggesting but at the same time there are ways in which it CAN work.  But I know of no benefits to going that route, just risks.  

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The 80 Hz XO point is commonly used to keep voices from being played through the subwoofer.  Above that and you can get male voice in the sub.

 

Nobody wants to hear voices coming out of the subwoofer.  B)

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