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prog guy

lascalas very little bass

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I've seen somewhere around here that someone braced across the front of the cabinet in a way that wouldn't interfere with those grills but I haven't found it.  

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This is anecdotal, but when I had my LaScala's in my living room they seemed to have really weak bass output.  Later on, I put them in my office using the exact same amplifier, similar size room, and the bass in the office sounds pretty strong.   I can only assume that other's commentary is correct and that placement makes a big difference on the bass output for LaScala's.

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1 hour ago, Tony Whitlow said:

Bass response was never an issue until the advent of subwoofers. 50hz is lower than you think. There is very little “audible” music information below 50hz unless you are listening to pipe organ music. Paul Klipsch’s aim was to produce accurate undistorted efficient bass. I have a subwoofer but was extremely happy with mine for years. You don’t have to have a sub but a sub is icing on the cake


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A LaScala and Belle have a full HORN cutoff frequency of about 104 Hz., which is why I DOUBLED the horn length when I designed my Quarter Pie Horns, which cut off at 50 Hz., but still have decent output below 40 Hz. A La Scala becomes a sealed box direct radiator inside an open box below that 104 Hz. frequency. You can't cheat Physics. The horn is just too short.

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I see you are using a Carver amp, what are you using for a preamp? I have a pair of belles and I don't have an issue with bass, I just bumped up the bass knob on my integrated amp (I know that's frowned upon) and I'm a happy camper.

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The room the speakers are in has more of an effect on the speakers than you think.  Your room's dimensions or surfaces can be nulling or absorbing the bass frequencies in your room.

 

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The bass horn of the LaScala generally starts to roll off around 55-60hz, and by the point it gets to 45hz or lower, it has become pretty weak on the bass end.  It is the design of the bass horn lens.  All you have to do is look at the specs of the speaker to already know this.  If you want more bottom end, then opt for the Klipschorns, instead....but the alternative is to add a subwoofer, preferably a HORN-LOADED subwoofer.

 

The beauty of the LaScala is that you get about 90% of horn-loaded performance of what the Klipschorn puts out, with no need for proper "K-horn Corners" in the room.

 

Until all of this electronically synthesized "music" came along, very few people even noticed the lack of extreme bottom-end in the LaScala bass bin.  But people nowadays are used to all kinds of bass-heavy equalization in their "Beats" headphones and such, and think that is how music is SUPPOSED to sound.

 

Pushing your bass control up past flat on your preamp will do nothing since the bass horn lens itself is the culprit...but doing this will also create distortion and maybe even push your amp into clipping....which is also very hard on your drivers in the speakers.  If you want earthquake-like bass, then get a subwoofer to go with them.  Keep in mind that the LaScala is meant to have no more than 105 watts RMS thrown into it, since that is its power rating...and the same applies to all the ORIGINAL Heritage speakers designs.  

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Yeah, again, it's the physics of a horn loaded system at play.   I'm not sure how much I agree with comments about equalization, so long as you aren't listening at very high volumes.  I can get earsplitting levels with a 10W tube amp, which means I have quite a bit of headroom for equalization.  My house is 1930, so small square rooms, not the best for this type speaker, but they're still far better than my small boxes.  I get a lot of 200-300 Hz buildup that needs to be reduced, and can add 60Hz or lower to good effect, feel the impact of those woofers through the floor and walls.  When I'm doing critical listening in front of them, they don't run all that loud.   In fact, I'd say bass heavy modern music has an opposite effect; it needs LESS EQ and sounds more even. 

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Simple fix, add a horn loaded subwoofer.

 

Once you add a proper sub you will wonder how you ever got by without one.

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5 minutes ago, babadono said:

The woofer CAN be removed. Just sayin'.

yes by tearing the cabinet all apart!

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1 hour ago, HDBRbuilder said:

The bass horn of the LaScala generally starts to roll off around 55-60hz, and by the point it gets to 45hz or lower, it has become pretty weak on the bass end.  It is the design of the bass horn lens.  All you have to do is look at the specs of the speaker to already know this.  If you want more bottom end, then opt for the Klipschorns, instead....but the alternative is to add a subwoofer, preferably a HORN-LOADED subwoofer.

 

The beauty of the LaScala is that you get about 90% of horn-loaded performance of what the Klipschorn puts out, with no need for proper "K-horn Corners" in the room.

 

Until all of this electronically synthesized "music" came along, very few people even noticed the lack of extreme bottom-end in the LaScala bass bin.  But people nowadays are used to all kinds of bass-heavy equalization in their "Beats" headphones and such, and think that is how music is SUPPOSED to sound.

 

Pushing your bass control up past flat on your preamp will do nothing since the bass horn lens itself is the culprit...but doing this will also create distortion and maybe even push your amp into clipping....which is also very hard on your drivers in the speakers.  If you want earthquake-like bass, then get a subwoofer to go with them.  Keep in mind that the LaScala is meant to have no more than 105 watts RMS thrown into it, since that is its power rating...and the same applies to all the ORIGINAL Heritage speakers designs.  

yes Thants why I want to sell them as I have very hi power CarverM1-ot amps and I want to enjoy my music loud and feel the punch.

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1 minute ago, babadono said:

Screws and a gasket? Do not attempt a motor rebuild:)

I'm a 30 year CAT field service tech have done many motor rebuilds out in the field!

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