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screw top La Scala

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Jim,

I've several times been asked about the background and purpose of the screw top La Scala. I got mine from Dee the same year that he hosted a gathering in Scott, and know a bit about them, but would like to be able to relate a more complete explanation. Would you enlighten me?

SSH

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I'll look for pictures but I neglected to take many.  Mine were used for organ installations... came with mono amps installed in the top of each cabinet with attenuators added to the crossover boards with the tweeter and mids cranked way down.  The top had to come off to be able to access the amplifier.  So when I bought these 4 or 5 years ago the tweeters and mids had essentially been barely used.   That is still the case as I have a BMS mid and Beyma tweeter currently.  

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Found this picture: 

You can see the amp on the left and attenuators in front of the crossover on the right.

La Scala_ScrewTop.jpg

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The owner kept the amplifiers which I believe were mono Lafayette's.  He thought he could get good money for them on Ebay (maybe he did).  Between the amp bottom and the cabinet there was what looked like a thin sheet of aluminum newspaper plate... I assume from the local Hope paper in 1976.  

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Some (but not all!) of the LaScalas built with the woofer access door under the mid-horn lens at the TOP of the doghouse had screw-on top panels.  Also, some of the Industrial models had screw-on top panels.  Although, TECHNICALLY not "decorator" models, many early LaScalas had no top or side panels to the hi-frequency upper section for a  time.  A number of the "Industrial" LaScalas had the screw-on tops, provided they were designated as Industrial models prior to assembly.  Many of those built by/for employees also had screw-on top panels, but they were generally countersunk screw heads and filled with dowels or wood putty in the sanding department.

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