Jump to content
The Klipsch Audio Community
Sign in to follow this  
johnnydrama

Klipsch at Work

Recommended Posts

Was just interested in seeing what some of you have for setups in your "work offices." I can't remember who it was but I saw someone who had a nearfield Cornwall setup or something ridiculous. I don't have anything that obnoxious but I really enjoy both my G-17 at my computer and my Heresy's for more serious listening sessions. I also really miss my favorite nearfield setup of XL-12s and Ultimax 10 powered by a little 15 watt Dayton DTA-1. But I had to do away with that when I went to a triple monitor arrangement. 

 

Interested to see what some of you crazies have in your offices, even if it is a home office. 

IMG_1328.jpg

IMG_1325.jpg

B7741F21-1432-480A-9E76-8D613B22DEEC.JPG

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm retired, but I still "work."  When sitting at my desk, this is what I see.  The off-white stuff along the bottom of the picture is a dark brown 5 seat couch that was washed out by the flash.  The couch is directly in front of the desk That's where family and friends sit to see a movie on the retractable AT projection screen that is hanging from the ceiling.  While working, I listen to orchestral music, classical to contemporary and jazz.  If I'm writing, the music has to have no lyrics.  To the sides and rear are bookcases.  The center section of the wall is AT wall fabric hiding a center channel, a flush mounted Belle Klipsch in a bump out, with a larger top hat containing a K401 mid horn, and a K77, both at th same height as the ones in the Khorns.  Audyssey corrects any high frequency loss caused by the wall fabric and the screen.

 

DSCN1826.thumb.JPG.b106497c6d196f0d9fc3234f736a1d16.JPG

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How did you determine placement of the dispersion panels?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That sir is surely a wise retired man's setup. Excellent work sir, looks great and surely sounds even better.   I am also interested in what other "crazies" have for office setups.   I have no office as I mobile at work and thus no stereo there.   

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 8/31/2018 at 7:01 PM, Schu said:

How did you determine placement of the dispersion panels?

 

On 8/31/2018 at 7:07 PM, Westcoastdrums said:

That sir is surely a wise retired man's setup. Excellent work sir, looks great and surely sounds even better.   I am also interested in what other "crazies" have for office setups.   I have no office as I mobile at work and thus no stereo there.   

 

@Schu,

Nothing scientific -- the purpose of the front wall diffusers is to help prevent specular and slap back echo, so we just tried to make sure there were plenty of objects "breaking up" the front wall and sending reflections off at different angles.  Some you see and some you don't.  The two obvious diffusers up high and to either side are of the kind former forum acoustical expert mas seemed to like.  We like their appearance.  There are 5 more on the back wall, also up high.  My wife made them -- she is into woodworking.  Below them on the back wall (and side walls), are bookshelves with both books and art objects on them, which also diffuse, and to a degree, absorb.  Returning to the front, that wall is also broken up by the Khorns themselves, by the two tall vertical windows (nearly permanently covered by Venetian blinds, which are moderately diffusing, in front of black-out shades) and, slightly, by the African bowl.  Behind the bowl, behind the acoustically transparent wall fabric, occupying the entire center section, is a floor to ceiling bump-out containing an elevated, flush mounted, Belle Klipsch center channel with the mods and position described in my original post.  Above the Belle is a tangle of diffusers of several kinds, including, almost touching the fabric, a pass through variety of the kind you see out in the room, with dowels of various sizes behind them, at various depths.  There is a subwoofer in the bump out as well.  It seems to work a bit better in there than at the other places we've had it.  The top of the bump-out is slanted at the same pitch as the non-parallel ceiling of the room (high in the back of the room), and is continuous with it.  We felt we had to make one surface non-parallel and the ceiling was the easiest.  The sloped ceiling of the bump-out and the sloped main ceiling combined make a sort of 28 foot long horn -- I have no idea if it works that way, but my wife calls it a Garyhorn.

 

Thanks, @Westcoastdrums-- it does sound good. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, johnnydrama said:

 I can't remember who it was but I saw someone who had a nearfield Cornwall setup or something ridiculous.

 

 

 

 

 

Just for the record, in case anyone is interested, Cornwalls work very well in near-field applications.  I've worked with them in 10X10 rooms spaced 6-7 feet apart, and listened to at a similar distance, and they really shine!

 

 

Maynard

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, garyrc said:

 

 

@Schu,

Nothing scientific -- the purpose of the front wall diffusers is to help prevent specular and slap back echo, so we just tried to make sure there were plenty of objects "breaking up" the front wall and sending reflections off at different angles.  Some you see and some you don't.  The two obvious diffusers up high and to either side are of the kind former forum acoustical expert mas seemed to like.  We like their appearance.  There are 5 more on the back wall, also up high.  My wife made them -- she is into woodworking.  Below them on the back wall (and side walls), are bookshelves with both books and art objects on them, which also diffuse, and to a degree, absorb.  Returning to the front, that wall is also broken up by the Khorns themselves, by the two tall vertical windows (nearly permanently covered by Venetian blinds, which are moderately diffusing, in front of black-out shades) and, slightly, by the African bowl.  Behind the bowl, behind the acoustically transparent wall fabric, occupying the entire center section, is a floor to ceiling bump-out containing an elevated, flush mounted, Belle Klipsch center channel with the mods and position described in my original post.  Above the Belle is a tangle of diffusers of several kinds, including, almost touching the fabric, a pass through variety of the kind you see out in the room, with dowels of various sizes behind them, at various depths.  The top of the bump-out is slanted at the same pitch as the non-parallel ceiling of the room (high in the back of the room), and is continuous with it.  We felt we had to make one surface non-parallel and the ceiling was the easiest.  The sloped ceiling of the bump-out and the sloped main ceiling combined make a sort of 28 foot long horn -- I have no idea if it works that way, but my wife calls it a Garyhorn.

 

Thanks, @Westcoastdrums

 

That placement is why I think I want to give sound clouds a try. I have an upward slope to the back wall that is about 15' tall... I am thinking about hanging absorption from the ceiling in some creative manner.

 

0129ca773d05ef132cfd3d173986aaf5.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...