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Synthetic Motor Oil.....

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On Nitrogen vs Air in the tires.

I LOVE the nitrogen.

I check the tire pressure the first of every month, every vehicle I've ever owned. I'll have a pocket full of quarters when I go out to do it. Until owning nitrogen filled tires for a while.

When the pressure of cold tires not moved since the day before and not in the sun does not change for six months????

 

I quit taking the tire gauge out I just eyeball them and go!

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2 hours ago, JohnJ said:

Was trying to be facetious!

They're all actually organically grown, dirt and water....... There has never been a real explanation on display at any grocery store that I've ever seen. Asked a gal with a kind face once long ago, she said no chemicals involved with growing them. Ha! Like I'd ever believe that, there's no escaping chemicals anywhere on this planet anymore!!

I think the pesticides and fertilizers they can, or cannot use, is what makes them "Organically Certified" or not.

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In 94' I bought a brand new Eagle Talon ES (non-turbo). The minute I brought it home it was on jack stands getting the upgrade/go fast parts (Borla exhaust, K&N air and later oil filters, later Royal Purple oil, tire pressure up to 35 lbs. from 27 lbs.) and ported the exhaust manifold.

 

The window sticker said 19 /27 hwy. mpg.

 

After all these mods...........40 mpg. hwy. But I atribute some of that to the Royal Purple.

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1 hour ago, Mighty Favog said:

In 94' I bought a brand new Eagle Talon ES (non-turbo). The minute I brought it home it was on jack stands getting the upgrade/go fast parts (Borla exhaust, K&N air and later oil filters, later Royal Purple oil, tire pressure up to 35 lbs. from 27 lbs.) and ported the exhaust manifold.

 

The window sticker said 19 /27 hwy. mpg.

 

After all these mods...........40 mpg. hwy. But I atribute some of that to the Royal Purple.

 

I assume you bumped up the timing about 6 degrees also which would account for the largest increase in gas mileage.

JJK

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21 minutes ago, JJkizak said:

 

I assume you bumped up the timing about 6 degrees also which would account for the largest increase in gas mileage.

JJK

 

Nope. 5-BTDC just as the book called for. 😊

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Nitrogen vs air...BS unless you are constantly over heating the tires by grossly  over speeding  or friction (either of which would be outside tire design) or altitude changes (BIG AZZ changes). Keep your quarters.

Just for the record the reason N2 is used is because it has less moisture content therefore less changes in overt pressure due to temperature changes. At 30-40 PSI in street tires this pressure change is negligible. At 200 MPH for hours or in an aircraft tire at altitude well then we can talk. 

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18 minutes ago, USNRET said:

Nitrogen vs air...BS unless you are constantly over heating the tires by grossly  over speeding  or friction (either of which would be outside tire design) or altitude changes (BIG AZZ changes). Keep your quarters.

Just for the record the reason N2 is used is because it has less moisture content therefore less changes in overt pressure due to temperature changes. At 30-40 PSI in street tires this pressure change is negligible. At 200 MPH for hours or in an aircraft tire at altitude well then we can talk. 

 

=== an informed answer, Thanks. Even after smoking 3x 20 pounders — 

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9 hours ago, T2K said:

My wife has had a Honda (4 cyl ) for 28 months. It has 4,300 miles. Garaged and driven locally every day. The salesman told me to change the synthetic oil every 10,000 miles. I told him I would see him in 5 years. He said in that case change it once a year. I'm wondering what effect frequent short trips has on synthetic oil as opposed to organic oil?

 

Keith

 

it takes me a few years to rack up enough miles to warrant a change of synthetic oil.  This should not degrade the oil. 

 

Didn't someone here state that they use Royal Purple and do not change the oil, just replenish it? 

 

 

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Once a year was the standard for dino oil if not enough miles were driven.  Synth should therefore not be subject to the same standard.  What seems to be more important is maintaining the proper amount, and keeping a good working filter installed.  if synth does not break down as easily as dino, the mileage model should suffice.  The only caveat that immediately comes to mind is if there is a lot of idling involved versus actual miles.

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11 hours ago, Mighty Favog said:

 

Nope. 5-BTDC just as the book called for. 😊

 

Then in my opinion I do not believe your gas mileage figures.

JJK

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Two Car Talk references regarding oil.

 

First, Ray often spoke about his Dodge Colt Vista (Mitsubishi) in which he NEVER changed the oil; he merely topped it off regularly.  I don’t recall whether he changed a filter.  With regular oil changes, filters are deemed by some manufacturers to be unnecessary. Recall that VW beetles did not have oil filters.

 

Second, I was a caller on Car Talk regarding a Saturn my sons “inherited” from our ninety-five year-old neighbor, Margaret.  A back story is appropriate.  

 

She purchased the car new and rarely drove it.  She probably never exceeded 30 mph.  She’d lived in her house since it was built in 1948.  She never had a garage, not even a driveway, so she parked the car in front of her house.

 

We had a key to her car so that we could pull it into our driveway if snow was anticipated or had fallen.  We’d clean the snow from her car and park it back in front of her house after the snowplows had done their work.  We also cleared the walks in front of her house and to her front porch. This continued for several years.  Margaret was extremely grateful.

 

My motives were not totally selfless.  If her car stayed at the curb during a “snow emergency,” it forced the snowplows to swing around her car.  In addition to burying her car, by the time the snowplows got back to the curb, they had passed my house, making my cleanup more difficult.  Also, I’m sure I would standby and watch a nonagenarian dig her car out of a snowbank.

 

She was an avid reader.  One morning my wife,  Nancy, noticed Margaret’s morning paper still on her front porch.  She went into the house and found Margaret still in bed and not doing well.  Nancy called Margaret’s daughter who lived 45 minutes away.  Nancy sat with Margaret to wait for the daughter.  Unfortunately, Margaret passed before the daughter arrived.

 

The daughter eventually informed us that her mother wanted our sons to have her Saturn as repayment for the snow removal.  It quickly was apparent that the daughter had sons who coveted the extremely low mileage like new loaded Saturn sedan.  I offered to pay $2,500 for the car.

 

Hindsight says I should have let Margaret’s grandsons have the Saturn.  First it needed new rotors all around; they were badly rusted from limited use.   Next, the timing chain failed with less than 6,000 miles on the odometer.  The service records confirmed that Margaret had the oil changed at the selling dealer several times.  Saturn/GM refused to repair the timing chain under warranty (the car was more than five years old).  Apparently, a chain tensioner failed to function properly causing the metal timing chain to fail.  GM based its decision on two factors: 1. Changed use.  In other words, GM argued that my teenage son drove the car harder than its prior owner, which the car couldn’t take; and 2. Infrequent oil changes.  The records confirmed that often more than a year went by between oil changes.  Despite the fact that oil changes were done every 1,000 miles, or so, GM argued the “stale” oil caused the chain tensioner to freeze which broke the timing chain at less than 5% of its design life.

 

I ran those two theories by Tom and Ray.  Tom called BS on theory 1, but Tom and Ray said GM had a point on theory 2.   To be fair, GM split the cost of the several thousand dollar repair.

 

Personally, I’ve always used regular oil and changed it regularly at 6 months or 5,000 miles.  Other than the Saturn, I’ve never had an oil related failure.

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I've had several GM vehicles that were second cars so the mileage stayed low...the requirements were always at the least once a year oil change to maintain the warranty...

 

shopping sales and rebates, I can always find Mobil 1 synthetic (my preference but other choices are good too) for about the same if not less than I can buy Dino oil for my cars and have used synthetic on my cars and the GF's car since 2001...

 

I see as a cure for several ills that GM (at least) has gone to full synthetic for many of their cars...their current Dexos 1 gen2 is now full synthetic from the previous synthetic blend which I always thought was the worst of both worlds...

 

I feel more comfortable with the 6 months or 5000 mile changes myself but that could be because I as brought up on the 3000/3month oil changes (which enriched the oil companies and lightened my wallet)...good luck with your choice

 

Bill

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Since we're on oils here...

 

Anyone know about International Hy-Trans?  (hydraulic / transmission fluid for tractors)

 

Recently acquired an International 1066 and the zealots are chanting "Hytrans, Hytrans, Hytrans" as the ONLY choice for the machine.  I guess, lest you die or get your ear drums stabbed by your wife.  I don't quite know but it seems something negative will befall you.

 

In truth....that very well may be.....however, I don't know the Truth so when I see other brands of oil saying Hytrans compatible and are half the cost, it gets my attention.  

 

I AM however, convinced that Case/IH does NOT make their own oil so, someone out there makes it.  Do they sell it to other brands?  I understand they sell it to New Holland for their MasterTrans (I think is the name).  I don't yet know the price....

 

Both of these are expensive (I think I need just over 25 gallons to change fluid, approaching $500 if I understand the numbers correctly)  and the closest one is near 30 miles away (New Holland) while the Case/IH is 60 miles away.  I can go to Autozone and get "Hytran compatible" drive 12 miles and save cash to boot.

 

What say the oil experts?

 

 

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