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New to Klipsch, need help to setup Dolby Atmos speakers


PK09
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Hi,

 

This is my first time using Klipsch speakers and also first time setting up home theater systems.

 

Recently purchased below 9.2 Klipsch speakers and a AV receiver.

 

RP-8060FA (4x) - Floor-standing
RP-504C (1x) - Center
RP-502S (1 pair) - Surround
SPL-120 (2x) - Subwoofer

 

Denon AVR-X4500H - 9.2 Channel receiver.

 

The person helped me setting up the home theater system couldn't able to connect rear floor standing height dolby atmos speakers to the receiver. He said the RP-8060FA speakers has additional inputs for height speakers that cannot be connected to 9.2 channel receiver.

 

Please help me understand what options I have to make use of all speakers with this receiver. Also I hear about bi-wiring and bi-amping not sure if we can able to use with Klipsch speakers.

I googled online but there are plenty of information and now its more confusing, so any comment or suggestion is much appreciated. 

 

Thanks a lot in advance for you help.

 

Regards

PK

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Hi PK, 

 

The good news is that you most certainly can connect your Dolby Atmos speakers to this receiver, as your receiver does support Dolby Atmos. I'm not familiar with the specific connection arrangement of the Denon receivers, as I use Yamaha receivers, however a quick look at the user manual will show you how to connect those up-firing Atmos speakers.

 

The bad news is that it looks like you might have to forego using one pair of speakers, either the Rear surrounds if you go with a 5.2.4 setup, where the 5 represents: front Left, Front Right, Center, Surround Left and Surround Right, the 2 represents your two subwoofers, and the 4 represents the four atmos speakers.

 

Alternatively, you would choose a 7.2.2 configuration, where you connect the above mentioned 5 speakers + your rear surrounds (RP-502S), your two subs, and then just 2 of the atmos speakers.

 

Once you've decided which configuration your prefer, look this configuration up in the manual and it will show you exactly where to connect the atmos speakers/terminals and how to adjust the settings on the receiver to assign these height channels correctly. On the speaker side, the atmos channels will go to those additional inputs that you referred to in your post.

 

And no, you shouldn't bi-amp the atmos enabled speakers, as that would effectively turn them into a single channel instead of a main and atmos channel.

 

I hope this helps.

 

PS: I should mention that I don't own these Atmos enabled speakers as my atmos are in-ceiling speakers, and neither do I own this receiver, so if I have provided incorrect advice, I am sure one of the forum veterans will correct me... in that case, I apologize.

 

Brendon

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8 minutes ago, inMotionGraphics said:

 

And no, you shouldn't bi-amp the atmos enabled speakers, as that would effectively turn them into a single channel instead of a main and atmos channel.

 

No it wouldn't.  The RP-8060fa has separate inputs for the tweeter and for the woofers in the main part of the speakers that are completely separate from the Atmos speaker inputs.

 

Having said that, PK09 I don't think you have enough channels on your amp to connect everything the way it is so I wouldn't even go down the bi wire or bi amp road.

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12 minutes ago, wuzzzer said:

 

No it wouldn't.  The RP-8060fa has separate inputs for the tweeter and for the woofers in the main part of the speakers that are completely separate from the Atmos speaker inputs.

 

Having said that, PK09 I don't think you have enough channels on your amp to connect everything the way it is so I wouldn't even go down the bi wire or bi amp road.

 

Thanks for pointing that out @wuzzzer. I (incorrectly) assumed he was meaning he wanted to connect/bridge the main terminals to the Atmos terminals, but I see now how the connections are set up on these speakers on Klipsch's website.

 

Either way, definitely skip the bi-amping, and if it were me, I'd just connect two of the atmos speakers for a 7.2.2 channel setup. I think you'll enjoy these speakers!

Edited by inMotionGraphics
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Hello PK,

you have the following options with your equipment:

you can make a:

7.2.2 configuration (2 Atmos speakers functional - front or back but front preferred).

5.2.4 configuration (4 Atmos speakers functional but no Surround Back)

 

If you connect an external amplifier you can make the

7.2.4 configuration

The external amplifier can be set to power the 2 front speakers or the rear height speakers.

 

Hope this helps.

 

 

 

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21 hours ago, inMotionGraphics said:

Hi PK, 

 

The good news is that you most certainly can connect your Dolby Atmos speakers to this receiver, as your receiver does support Dolby Atmos. I'm not familiar with the specific connection arrangement of the Denon receivers, as I use Yamaha receivers, however a quick look at the user manual will show you how to connect those up-firing Atmos speakers.

 

The bad news is that it looks like you might have to forego using one pair of speakers, either the Rear surrounds if you go with a 5.2.4 setup, where the 5 represents: front Left, Front Right, Center, Surround Left and Surround Right, the 2 represents your two subwoofers, and the 4 represents the four atmos speakers.

 

Alternatively, you would choose a 7.2.2 configuration, where you connect the above mentioned 5 speakers + your rear surrounds (RP-502S), your two subs, and then just 2 of the atmos speakers.

 

Once you've decided which configuration your prefer, look this configuration up in the manual and it will show you exactly where to connect the atmos speakers/terminals and how to adjust the settings on the receiver to assign these height channels correctly. On the speaker side, the atmos channels will go to those additional inputs that you referred to in your post.

 

And no, you shouldn't bi-amp the atmos enabled speakers, as that would effectively turn them into a single channel instead of a main and atmos channel.

 

I hope this helps.

 

PS: I should mention that I don't own these Atmos enabled speakers as my atmos are in-ceiling speakers, and neither do I own this receiver, so if I have provided incorrect advice, I am sure one of the forum veterans will correct me... in that case, I apologize.

 

Brendon

Thank you Brendon. You guys have lots of experience in setting up these speakers and talking about these models specifically. Happy to know about this forum.

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21 hours ago, wuzzzer said:

 

No it wouldn't.  The RP-8060fa has separate inputs for the tweeter and for the woofers in the main part of the speakers that are completely separate from the Atmos speaker inputs.

 

Having said that, PK09 I don't think you have enough channels on your amp to connect everything the way it is so I wouldn't even go down the bi wire or bi amp road.

Thanks Wuzzzer, so it looks bi-wire and bi-amp is not a good options for these speakers. Any recommended external amp to use with this Denon receiver?

 

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15 hours ago, JefDC said:

Hello PK,

you have the following options with your equipment:

you can make a:

7.2.2 configuration (2 Atmos speakers functional - front or back but front preferred).

5.2.4 configuration (4 Atmos speakers functional but no Surround Back)

 

If you connect an external amplifier you can make the

7.2.4 configuration

The external amplifier can be set to power the 2 front speakers or the rear height speakers.

 

Hope this helps.

 

 

 

Hi JefDC, Thanks for your reply. Right now my rear height atmos speakers are not working, I think because of not having enough channels in the receiver. Do I need to connect external amplifier to make use of these rear height speakers along with other speakers. Do you know what to look for when buying external amplifier e.g. compatible with Denon receiver and number of ext amp channels etc.

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Hi PK,

I think if you have 3 front speakers (L,C,R) and 4 speakers in the rear (2 rears, 2 rear surrounds) thats a total of 7 speakers so far and the denon can only do 9 + 2 subs, so it makes sense why the rear atmos doesnt work. Hopefully the front atmos you can hear audio from. I have the same A/V and a similar setup with 11.2 channels using the denon and an Emotiva 3 channel amp to power the 3 front speakers. The second video I linked will show you how to hook up an amp to your receiver.

 

Here is the amp: https://emotiva.com/products/xpa-3-gen3?variant=6293390393387

 

This will free up some power and allow you to run the 2 rear atmos speakers from your receiver once you add an amp to it. I'm still new to using amps as well but I've noticed the biggest difference in price is usually how much power goes to each channel and what class of amp is, the best being class A. Class A has the least distorted audio and cleanest sound from the receiver to your speakers. This is one of the better amps to get but it was too expensive for me to try out as my first amp:
http://www.parasound.com/a52+.php

 

Hope this helps,

Spencer

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9 hours ago, spencersmb said:

Hi PK,

I think if you have 3 front speakers (L,C,R) and 4 speakers in the rear (2 rears, 2 rear surrounds) thats a total of 7 speakers so far and the denon can only do 9 + 2 subs, so it makes sense why the rear atmos doesnt work. Hopefully the front atmos you can hear audio from. I have the same A/V and a similar setup with 11.2 channels using the denon and an Emotiva 3 channel amp to power the 3 front speakers. The second video I linked will show you how to hook up an amp to your receiver.

 

Here is the amp: https://emotiva.com/products/xpa-3-gen3?variant=6293390393387

 

This will free up some power and allow you to run the 2 rear atmos speakers from your receiver once you add an amp to it. I'm still new to using amps as well but I've noticed the biggest difference in price is usually how much power goes to each channel and what class of amp is, the best being class A. Class A has the least distorted audio and cleanest sound from the receiver to your speakers. This is one of the better amps to get but it was too expensive for me to try out as my first amp:
http://www.parasound.com/a52+.php

 

Hope this helps,

Spencer

 

Hi Spencer,

Thanks for your information. I didn't see your second video, did you posted link here?

Also, I saw other models of Emotiva (https://emotiva.com/collections/home-theater/products/a-700), is this model A-700 a good one to use along with these speakers and receiver?

Emotiva 3 channel amp XPA-3 Gen3 is a very expensive amp. I am not sure if there is any benefit using this expensive ext amp instead of upgrading to 11.2 channel Denon receiver.

 

Thank you

 

Regards

PK

 

 

 

 

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Hi Pk,

I'll link the second video at the bottom of this. In basic terms there can be few benefits to using an amp:

  • More power is driven to each speaker (assuming you buy an amp capable of delivering more power than your receiver) -You will literally be able to hear things that you didn't before.
  • Allows you to connect more speakers (in the case you have a 9.2 receiver capable of doing 11.2 channels)
  • Less stress on your receiver because it doesn't have to work as hard delivering power to speakers
  • Less distortion per channel. The power used to send an audio signal to your speaker will be cleaner with better amps
  • Also once you take partial load off your receiver, it has more power to send to other speakers. 

So when you look at that amp you linked in the specs it says 80 watts per channel when ALL channels are hooked up to a speaker. Thats 80 x 7 for a total of 560w. If you only had 5 channels being used on the amp - that power would then be 560 / 5 = 112 watts per channel. 

Now let's look at the 11.2 channel denon. The specs say it does 140 watts per channel when ONLY 2 channels are driven. Thats a total of 280 watts (half the power of the amp). So if you have 11 speakers hooked up to it that means you will have about 25 watts going to each speaker, and that is based off the denon spec sheet which usually optimistic at best. Not nearly as much power as an entry level amp. 

 

So if you had the 7 channel amp driving all 7 speakers, thats 80 w per speaker output, with 4 speakers powered by the receiver now to get you to a total of 11 speakers. Those 4 would be getting 70w each from the receiver. Almost 3 times the power now then without an amp. Also the other 7 will be getting a cleaner signal from the amp and should sound better in addition to being capable of louder output.

Again this also depends if you have good speakers or not.


Hopefully I explained this correctly and makes sense!

-Spencer

Second video: 

 

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14 minutes ago, spencersmb said:

Hi Pk,

I'll link the second video at the bottom of this. In basic terms there can be few benefits to using an amp:

  • More power is driven to each speaker (assuming you buy an amp capable of delivering more power than your receiver) -You will literally be able to hear things that you didn't before.
  • Allows you to connect more speakers (in the case you have a 9.2 receiver capable of doing 11.2 channels)
  • Less stress on your receiver because it doesn't have to work as hard delivering power to speakers
  • Less distortion per channel. The power used to send an audio signal to your speaker will be cleaner with better amps
  • Also once you take partial load off your receiver, it has more power to send to other speakers. 

So when you look at that amp you linked in the specs it says 80 watts per channel when ALL channels are hooked up to a speaker. Thats 80 x 7 for a total of 560w. If you only had 5 channels being used on the amp - that power would then be 560 / 5 = 112 watts per channel. 

Now let's look at the 11.2 channel denon. The specs say it does 140 watts per channel when ONLY 2 channels are driven. Thats a total of 280 watts (half the power of the amp). So if you have 11 speakers hooked up to it that means you will have about 25 watts going to each speaker, and that is based off the denon spec sheet which usually optimistic at best. Not nearly as much power as an entry level amp. 

 

So if you had the 7 channel amp driving all 7 speakers, thats 80 w per speaker output, with 4 speakers powered by the receiver now to get you to a total of 11 speakers. Those 4 would be getting 70w each from the receiver. Almost 3 times the power now then without an amp. Also the other 7 will be getting a cleaner signal from the amp and should sound better in addition to being capable of louder output.

Again this also depends if you have good speakers or not.


Hopefully I explained this correctly and makes sense!

-Spencer

Second video: 

 

 

Hi Spencer,

 

Thanks a lot for taking time to explain these terms. I like the way you explained with examples. Much appreciated. I have much better understanding now with usage of watts per channel and advantages of having ext amps.

 

Also I asked about Emotiva (https://emotiva.com/collections/home-theater/products/a-700), is A-700 model a good ext amp to use along with my Klipsch speakers and Denon receiver? Sorry to ask you again, I never use ext. amp before and not sure if this will best suit for my setup.

 

Regards

PK

 

 

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No Problem - I think good is a relative term, relative to how much money you are willing to spend haha. What I would do is hook everything up with out the amp - as many speakers as you can. Watch a few specific scenes from your fav movie for a week. Then get that A-700 amp that or the outlaw-5000 is a comparable alternative and similar price, I think its only 5-channel though.) Then watch your movies again at the same volume level etc and see if you can tell a difference. Also crank it and see if it gets louder than you thought, etc. If you can't tell a difference return it, but I'm fairly sure you will be able to hear one. I would think of it as an entry level amp to start off with. If you get more serious you can upgrade it later and add an additional amp to your setup. The main Left Right Center channels in the front are the most power hungry speakers so they should get the amp power first. So if you got another more robust amp later, you hook it up to power your mains and maybe your rears and then have your old amp power your 4 height channels. It's all about having fun and experimenting - an expensive hobby but super fun I think lol.

 

I would be love to hear what emotive sends back to you.

 

Thanks,

Spencer

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On 3/21/2019 at 1:51 AM, PK09 said:

Hi JefDC, Thanks for your reply. Right now my rear height atmos speakers are not working, I think because of not having enough channels in the receiver. Do I need to connect external amplifier to make use of these rear height speakers along with other speakers. Do you know what to look for when buying external amplifier e.g. compatible with Denon receiver and number of ext amp channels etc.

 

Hello PK,

for the external amplifier you can use any 2 channel amplifier with a power of 50 Watts (and up) for the rear channels.

If you want to use the external amplifier for the front speakers it would be a good idea to get a stable quality amplifier from 100 Watts (and up).

 

 

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4 hours ago, spencersmb said:

No Problem - I think good is a relative term, relative to how much money you are willing to spend haha. What I would do is hook everything up with out the amp - as many speakers as you can. Watch a few specific scenes from your fav movie for a week. Then get that A-700 amp that or the outlaw-5000 is a comparable alternative and similar price, I think its only 5-channel though.) Then watch your movies again at the same volume level etc and see if you can tell a difference. Also crank it and see if it gets louder than you thought, etc. If you can't tell a difference return it, but I'm fairly sure you will be able to hear one. I would think of it as an entry level amp to start off with. If you get more serious you can upgrade it later and add an additional amp to your setup. The main Left Right Center channels in the front are the most power hungry speakers so they should get the amp power first. So if you got another more robust amp later, you hook it up to power your mains and maybe your rears and then have your old amp power your 4 height channels. It's all about having fun and experimenting - an expensive hobby but super fun I think lol.

 

I would be love to hear what emotive sends back to you.

 

Thanks,

Spencer

 

Hi Spencer,

 

Thanks again for the information. LOL, yes its very expensive hobby, for me its just a beginning. I can imagine about you guys here on this forum, how much money, time and effort spend on these experiments.

 

I can also consider buying Outlaw 5000 and this seems to have more wattage (120 watts/channel * 5 = 600 watts) with 5 channels and in a similar price range. If doable, I am thinking of setting up the hungry front (left, center, right, height left and height right) 5 speakers with ext. amp and the remaining 6 speakers (2 rear surround, rear left, rear right, rear height left and rear height right) with Denon 9.2 receiver. Hope this will be a good test for wattage load balance. Is this a good idea to setup in this way?

 

Regards

Praveen Konidala

 

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2 hours ago, JefDC said:

 

Hello PK,

for the external amplifier you can use any 2 channel amplifier with a power of 50 Watts (and up) for the rear channels.

If you want to use the external amplifier for the front speakers it would be a good idea to get a stable quality amplifier from 100 Watts (and up).

 

 

 

Hi JefDC,

 

Right now I am thinking of buying either Emotiva A-700 or Outlaw Model 5000 to use for front all speakers including front height speakers.

 

Regards

Praveen Konidala

 

 

 

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3 minutes ago, spencersmb said:

@PK09 Yea thats basically what I'm doing as well. I haven't bought the amp yet but will soon. Buying new speakers next month so thats when I'll get the amp. Good luck and let me know how it goes if you don't mind!

 

Cheers,

Spencer

 

Sure Spencer, will let you know once I notice any change in sound. I will test sound this week without ext amp as you suggested and buy ext amp next week, most probably Outlaw 5000, only concern is the weight 50 lb, that little heavy for the home theater stand.

 

Regards

Praveen Konidala

 

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  • 3 weeks later...
On ‎3‎/‎22‎/‎2019 at 6:22 PM, spencersmb said:

@PK09 Yea thats basically what I'm doing as well. I haven't bought the amp yet but will soon. Buying new speakers next month so thats when I'll get the amp. Good luck and let me know how it goes if you don't mind!

 

Cheers,

Spencer

 

Hello Spencer,

 

Yesterday hooked up Outlaw 5000 to Denon 9.2 channel receiver.

 

After setup I did see some difference in sound but I can not certainly tell the difference in sound clarity or anyone measure. May be the load to the Denon receiver is balanced and power to the speakers are handled efficiently with the addition of Outlaw.

 

The good thing now is, I can hear sound from all speakers including front heights and surround heights.

 

@All --- I have a setup question, even though I had connected all 5 channels to Outlaw 5000 (Front (left, right), Center and Surround (left, right)), in the Denon speaker/Amp assign setup I only see front left and right is highlighted in the pre-out section and do not see center and surround left and right channel in the pre-out. Attached below is my Denon speaker/Amp assign setup with 11.2 channel assign mode.

 

image.thumb.png.72807b4e928edccea2a5911f895ec378.png

 

Anyone who had similar situation before, please let me know if there is anything wrong I am doing here or its just a technical gap with the Denon receiver.

 

Also is there any way we can test/check all 5 channels from Outlaw 5000 is getting the power (120 watts/channel) for these speakers, particularly my surround large floor standing speakers the full power it needed.

 

Regards

PK

 

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