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Heresy I cabinet repair

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I have a pair of Heresy I that suffered shipping damage to the cabinet corners.  Can they be repaired or restored back to the original condition?  Thanks.

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Edited by klipschhornfan

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Without removing and replacing the veneer, your only option is to build up wood putty on the corner then sand it to recover the sharp corner. Veneer is VERY thin, so the potential to sand through it while shaping the corner is a real possibility if you're not careful.

 

Then there's the issue of staining/oiling the repair to match the veneer. You could practice this repair on a scrap of 2x4 to get an idea of how it works and if the result is satisfactory to you.

 

You could cover the corner with one of those metal corner protectors used on commercial speakers. To make things look uniform, you could install those pieces on all four corners on both speakers if that doesn't offend your aesthetic sensibilities. Some of those corners are furniture grade and would look attractive on a home speaker.

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5 hours ago, Peter P. said:

Without removing and replacing the veneer, your only option is to build up wood putty on the corner then sand it to recover the sharp corner. Veneer is VERY thin, so the potential to sand through it while shaping the corner is a real possibility if you're not careful.

 

Then there's the issue of staining/oiling the repair to match the veneer. You could practice this repair on a scrap of 2x4 to get an idea of how it works and if the result is satisfactory to you.

 

You could cover the corner with one of those metal corner protectors used on commercial speakers. To make things look uniform, you could install those pieces on all four corners on both speakers if that doesn't offend your aesthetic sensibilities. Some of those corners are furniture grade and would look attractive on a home speaker.

 

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3 minutes ago, klipschhornfan said:

My Heresy I is made of real wood, not veneer.  

Sorry, but that's not correct.

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3 minutes ago, klipschhornfan said:

My Heresy I is made of real wood, not veneer.  Do you think a professional furniture restorer can repair them back to near original condition?

I would take it to a professional and ask their opinion.

 

When you say "real wood", do you mean "solid"?  I didn't think Klipsch used solid hardwoods for their Heresy's. Someone correct me if I'm wrong.

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^you are NOT incorrect... though birch sheets are essentially plys of hard wood.

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I think Mark has the best solution.  Unfortunately there is no easy repair to restore your speaker cab to like new condition without first restoring the sharp edges of the corner with something like Bondo and then re-veneering the affected cabinet sides.  Then applying a stain and finish to  try to match the original which will not be easy.  IF you could live with a less than perfect repair, a professional cabinet maker could cut out the damaged corner and fill in with wood or Bondo and patch in some veneer in just the corner.  Properly done it should not be noticeable from a distance.  Personally, if it were mine I would fill in with Bondo, and re-veneer the side, top and edges with a walnut veneer of similar grain pattern. 

 

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Re-veneering and matching the finish will be beyond most DIYers and it can get pricey also. 

Alternative would be to phone a moving company and get a name of someone who does these kinds of repairs (sometimes they do the work onsite). The outcome will not even be close to perfect, but for the cost it can be surprisingly good.

Good luck

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I agree, Tom.  The re-veneering is beyond most do it yourselfers.  I have a full woodworking shop as it is one of my hobbies building cabinets and furniture and this speaker cab repair is not easy. As he said how can I get it back to original condition, I simply said what I would do.  It will never look like original unless it is recovered in new veneer.  Also it is not necessary to remove the old veneer to recover it. But the old finish has to be removed to present a clean fresh surface to assure the glue adheres properly.  

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We are in agreement on the veneer thing. How about this as a strategy. Perhaps the OP is interested in getting the cabinets to match or complement some existing furniture or woodwork in his home. Might this be an opportunity (excuse)  to splurge say "why not". 

 

Rather than getting the cabinets back to their original appearance, choose your favorite veneer and finish. Then get a talented friend or cabinet shop to do them the way you like. 

There, I have just spent a couple of hundred of the OP's money. Seriously  that might be a good idea, however.

 

BTW, Dave I envy you having a full woodworking shop. 

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We had some furniture that had damage where the legs had been dragged on the floor and had become dented/chipped. The furniture repairman used something that looked like Crayons, which he melted and blended to get the color to match. He then filled the damaged area with the melted substance and smoothed it after it had hardened. He simulated the grain pattern by using a darker "crayon". The repaired area was a perfect match.

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I think what Don is referring to is called a "Tibetan wood stick". Furniture gets dented all the time by moving companies, the guys they get to fix it are amazing.

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It will cost more than they are worth to bad its on the front. But if a pro can fix it for reasonable price I woud probably do it. Or look for some small metal or plastic corner covers.

https://www.amazon.com/Medical-Grade-Large-Corner-Guards/dp/B078PD7W39/ref=sr_1_9?hvadid=3522503352&hvbmt=be&hvdev=c&hvqmt=e&keywords=corner%2Bcover&qid=1554040507&s=gateway&sr=8-9&th=1

Then get some smoked glass cut to fit on top of the corner pieces.

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All - I have the same situation, pair of Original Heresy's that have veneer and cabinet damage from a wet carpet.  The electronics are good and were untouched.  Too expensive to fix?  Part out?  Or if "sell them as is" what are they worth?  Thanks.

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13 minutes ago, Desron65 said:

All - I have the same situation, pair of Original Heresy's that have veneer and cabinet damage from a wet carpet.  The electronics are good and were untouched.  Too expensive to fix?  Part out?  Or if "sell them as is" what are they worth?  Thanks.

No way to evaluate the damage without a pic. But I’d guess it’s probably repairable.  

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3 minutes ago, Desron65 said:

All - I have the same situation, pair of Original Heresy's that have veneer and cabinet damage from a wet carpet.  The electronics are good and were untouched.  Too expensive to fix?  Part out?  Or if "sell them as is" what are they worth?  Thanks.

I guess it depends on how much you paid for them, if you are willing to take a small loss....etc.  Also depends on the drivers and networks that are installed.  Some drivers can bring a few dollars....  On the other hand, if you want to keep them, Bondo and Duratex work very well for little cost.  Here's something to think about.....

 

 

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You could cut a "cube" out of the corner slightly smaller than necessary to allow for the thickness of the new patch veneer using a good chisel.  The main thing is to get the corner square and slightly indented to allow critical placement  the square piece you will use to fill in the square cutout you made.  The square piece needs to be smaller than the cutout to account for the thickness of the very small patch of veneer.  Glue the square piece in place then attache veneer (very thin veneer)  Then use a Qtip to dab on stain and finish to match.  

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