Jump to content
The Klipsch Audio Community
Sign in to follow this  
robertkjr3d

Reduce the Brighness of the RP-8000f-floorstanding-speakers

Recommended Posts

32 minutes ago, Deang said:

I predict that no matter what he does, he won't be happy.

 

Dean, I am afraid you are absolutely correct. I sincerely hope the guy does not spend a huge amount of money on electronics trying to "solve" this problem. 

 

To the OP, I am not being disrespectful so don't take it that way. 

 

Your presenting complaint is ambiguous. What exactly is the problem? Your chase has been very disorganized. It has ranged from FLAC to KODDI adjustments to MP3. Unfortunately having an EQ device is not helping here. It is simply enabling you go back and forth and back again while you adjust by ear. I believe that will never come to a conclusion since the path is disorganized. You mention your original speakers, but we have no idea what they were (panels, horns etc). Agin you need to be specific about the problems and which are major and which are minor.

 

My friendly suggestion is that you need to keep it simple and have a clear goal in mind. Set the speakers up and listen to them. Do not mess with room EQ (at this point) or KODI volume controls or MP3s etc. Keep the signal path simple and get the speaker placement right (including toe-in, distance from walls, angle relative to the chair etc). This seems simple but it actually is not. It is tedious (use the same material over and over), but most importantly be systematic and manipulate just one variable at a time before chasing down interactions. Do not bounce around and certainly do not start spending money on electronics. Don't even get started on the EQing yet. Simply get the fundamentals right to begin with and have a clear goal. After that we can collectively help on room equalization (the EQing will start by having a measurable goal and the tweaking by ear will not come until much later and should be used sparingly).

 

I hope you take this advice in the spirit is given (helpful and not disrespectful).

Good luck,

-Tom

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
On 7/12/2019 at 9:59 AM, PrestonTom said:

 

Dean, I am afraid you are absolutely correct. I sincerely hope the guy does not spend a huge amount of money on electronics trying to "solve" this problem. 

 

To the OP, I am not being disrespectful so don't take it that way. 

 

Your presenting complaint is ambiguous. What exactly is the problem? Your chase has been very disorganized. It has ranged from FLAC to KODDI adjustments to MP3. Unfortunately having an EQ device is not helping here. It is simply enabling you go back and forth and back again while you adjust by ear. I believe that will never come to a conclusion since the path is disorganized. You mention your original speakers, but we have no idea what they were (panels, horns etc). Agin you need to be specific about the problems and which are major and which are minor.

 

My friendly suggestion is that you need to keep it simple and have a clear goal in mind. Set the speakers up and listen to them. Do not mess with room EQ (at this point) or KODI volume controls or MP3s etc. Keep the signal path simple and get the speaker placement right (including toe-in, distance from walls, angle relative to the chair etc). This seems simple but it actually is not. It is tedious (use the same material over and over), but most importantly be systematic and manipulate just one variable at a time before chasing down interactions. Do not bounce around and certainly do not start spending money on electronics. Don't even get started on the EQing yet. Simply get the fundamentals right to begin with and have a clear goal. After that we can collectively help on room equalization (the EQing will start by having a measurable goal and the tweaking by ear will not come until much later and should be used sparingly).

 

I hope you take this advice in the spirit is given (helpful and not disrespectful).

Good luck,

-Tom

 

 

This does sound a bit harsh, that I can never be happy.  I am very picky, and I have very sensitive ears.  I'm not one to go.... "they sound great!" and move on.  But eventually I stop tweaking and accept a "standard".  I finally did with my last setup before I switched AVRs and before I bought the Klipsch speakers.  I worked on that setup for a long time, until I ""upgraded""... Think of this as going from Windows 7 to 10.  At first everybody hates Win-10, then eventually, its pretty cool right?  Conversely, there is bound to be bugs until I settle down.

I was playing around with 'Speaker placement' last night.  I moved them much closer together, than I had previously.  The advantage here, is they are farther from (the wall on one side, and a book-shelf, and a cabinet on the other).  I believe this changed the sound configuration.  My ears were pleased.  I was not able to play at high-volume, because the wife was asleep.

 

Your suggestion of turning off the EQing and stuff.  I get that point.  "One propeller, Sir?" from Star Trek  LAFORGE: "sometimes you have to turn it all off."  
I left the Calibration that the Onkyo found.  I did mess with listening with the 'manual-EQ' off.  It still tends to sound better to my ears with the manual EQ on.  with some of the Data I previously found with the SPL Meter.  But I probably will have to run that again.  Now that the speakers are moved.  

 

Room equalization: The problem I was mentioning is that, I didn't trust my Onkyo-AVR with AccuEQ to do proper room-equalization.  But at the moment I'm still with it.  I think it would be easier with Audyssey, and systems that still have Audyssey.  Now that I've changed the speaker placement again, I should probably run AccuEQ again.  But that would be nerve-racking.  What if it changes how everything sounds?

 

On the up-side.  I listened to Alessia Cara's 'Scars to your beautiful' song... and there is a whole layer to that song that you can hear with these Klipsch, that I could never define before. WOW!  It sounds so cool.

 

FLAC to KODI adjustments?: Someone asked what I play with the speakers.  I only use KODI to play recorded Television.  Not for music.  I use FLAC files for Multi-channel Audio, mostly taken from Blu-rays.  I pointed out that I had a problem in my KODI setup, that was causing an audio issue (you guys didn't really need to know that, your right).  Although with my previous AVR and speaker-setup (that is before Klipsch) I was non-the-wiser on that issue. Is it possible, that these Klipsch, not only bring out good in sound, but also more of the bad?  Maybe.  I also use Windows-Itunes to play standard 256-MP3s. 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by robertkjr3d

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You may have not fully embraced my suggestion, but that's okay. I feel you should first spend hours and hours adjusting/experimenting with the position of the speakers, chair. distance from the wall(s), toe-in etc before you even think about any sort of EQing or messing with windows MP3ing etc.

 

Keep the signal path simple and pure and only use a very few cuts from a CD (don't bounce around different sources or too many demo cuts). 

Yes, it is a tedious process, but getting the fundamentals done first will allow you to try the "add ons" later in a more organized and systematic fashion.

 

Good luck,

-Tom 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/10/2019 at 2:15 PM, robertkjr3d said:

But even bad-quality-recordings should sound pretty good on good speakers.  Right? 

No, they'll sound worse.  You actually hear how bad they really are.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/12/2019 at 8:09 AM, Deang said:

I predict that no matter what he does, he won't be happy.

I disagree.  He obviously knows what he likes and doesn't like.  Sometimes it takes effort and trial and error to get there.  I've been through the process myself, I know what I like but it takes a while to find the right combination of gear and tweaks to get there.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, PrestonTom said:

You may have not fully embraced my suggestion, but that's okay. I feel you should first spend hours and hours adjusting/experimenting with the position of the speakers, chair. distance from the wall(s), toe-in etc before you even think about any sort of EQing or messing with windows MP3ing etc.

 

Keep the signal path simple and pure and only use a very few cuts from a CD (don't bounce around different sources or too many demo cuts. 

Yes, it is a tedious process, but getting the fundamentals done first will allow you to try the "add ons" later in a more organized and systematic fashion.

 

Good luck,

-Tom 

Agreed.  It's like hot rodding a car.  If you change too many things at once you don't know what's hurting and what's helping.  Change one and only one thing at a time and live with it for a bit before you make the next change.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I run my RP600M Speakers with a Yamaha RX-A3080 and they don't sound sharp or harsh with the EQ set to Natural. I had a pair of Elacs before, and they are not known for being harsh, and the Klipsch don't sound any worse in that regard.

I guess it comes down to the combination of Speakers, Room and Electronics...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The end of the story... Well nearly the end.

I purchased a MiniDSP UMIK-1 Calibration USB Mic... This software works along with REW (Room EQ Wizard) and (Equalizer APO).  
You take the room measurements and the response from the mic that REW gives you.  (At a few different listening positions...)  It will give you filters, (You average these) which you can feed into 'Equalizer APO'.  And this flattens the response.  Then Walla!!  Woohoo.  It sounds so much better.  Then you can retest with the mic, to test the response.  And since 97.999% of all the audio I ever listen to comes through the computer anyway.  I'm good.   The 'Equalizer APO' is already pre-programmed to work with outputs from 'Voicemeeter' that I've had running on my system for many years.

 

Obviously the Onkyo-AVR was supposed to do this stuff itself with its AccuEQ, but I knew it was not up to Snuff.  And it does not have you move the mic around to any other listening positions.  Since this was only a few days ago, that I ran this.  I haven't gotten around to using this calibration technique with my Center-Channel, or my rears yet.  But the results with the Klipsch front channels with the sub are amazing!

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@robertkjr3d wow! sound good news.. I tried use REW , in your opinion.. how is software? is easy to run ? you feel is good investment ? you resolve it..with REW ?

talk me about experience?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...