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Dave A

Hot Melt Glue for Capacitors

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OK all you crossover whizbangs I see plastic clips, zip ties but never hot melt. Is there a reason for this or is it just habit?

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1 minute ago, Dave A said:

OK all you crossover whizbangs I see plastic clips, zip ties but never hot melt. Is there a reason for this or is it just habit?

 

Some of the plastic film capacitors have very low melting points.

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OK so low temp glue sounds better then. Any idea which ones to stay away from?

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27 minutes ago, Dave A said:

OK so low temp glue sounds better then. Any idea which ones to stay away from?

 

https://www.mouser.com/pdfDocs/nichicon-film-capacitors-white-paper.pdf

 

Polypropylene melts at 169°C/336°F. Polyester melts at 257°C/495°F. Polyethlene Naphthalate melts at 262°C/504°F. Polystyrene melts at 100°C/212°F, which is why they're almost never used any more. Their performance is probably affected at temperatures well below their melting points.

 

My hot melt glue gun instructions claim that it reaches almost 400°F.

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"IF" I use hot glue to hold a cap either now or in my past career, it was done primarily using one of those cheap "crafts" glue gun that don't get quite as hot as one of the 3M hot melt glue guns.  Years ago, we bought those 3M hot melt guns from upholstery suppliers and seems like they were $150 back in the mid 90's.  Those things got the glue so hot that if it got on your skin, it instantly bubbled and took the skin off.  It had a crazy hot point. 

 

So just basic crafts glue gun from Hobby Lobby is all I use now if there are crossovers on smaller boards, like the CF-3's I had, Dynaco A25's, JBL L100T3, and most every other brand of speakers crossovers I've worked with.

 

DON'T use this 3M gun.  (hmm...hasn't changed much in price)

 

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Just buy one from partsexpress and then use the sticks made by gorilla glue. Perfectly acceptable. Be sure to clean all surfaces and slightly scuff with some very fine sandpaper (you are only scuffing the teflon tape around the cap).

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29 minutes ago, Deang said:

Just buy one from partsexpress and then use the sticks made by gorilla glue. Perfectly acceptable. Be sure to clean all surfaces and slightly scuff with some very fine sandpaper (you are only scuffing the teflon tape around the cap).

Dave, I don't know if you should listen to this guy or not.  He's been seen using zip ties.

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24 minutes ago, CECAA850 said:

He's been seen using zip ties.

 

What color?

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I always used GE silicone.  You could peel them up, peel it off and use them again.

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Plus one on the GE silicone...

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I have used silicone since about 1990.  Hot glue can become brittle over time -- if that's the route you go, make sure it's designed to stay flexible long-term.  I use electrical grade silicone now, which does not cause acidic (corrosive) out-gassing when it cures.

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3 hours ago, avguytx said:

"IF" I use hot glue to hold a cap either now or in my past career, it was done primarily using one of those cheap "crafts" glue gun that don't get quite as hot as one of the 3M hot melt glue gun

That's what I have courtesy of my wife who no longer needs it. Seems to work fine.

I thought about silicone too but the idea of set forget and work immediately was what I wanted

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I've used it, the Wal-Mart craft type.  The glue doesn't always stick well to the slick outer surface. 

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I've used a lot of RTV sealant for some NEMA enclosure situations.  This was to seal circuit boards from exposure to dust and water.  I've been curious about the long term effect of RTV on the boards but they have usually been damaged within a couple of years by other causes before I could see any harm from the sealants.  Thoughts on RTV?

 

I've been using Dow Corning 732 since this was a gasket type use but 738 might be more appropriate.  

https://www.modusadvanced.com/hubfs/Brochures-Guides/Dow-Corning-Silicone-Sealants.pdf

 

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On 9/17/2019 at 2:41 PM, JohnA said:

I've used it, the Wal-Mart craft type.  The glue doesn't always stick well to the slick outer surface. 

Which is why you have to clean and lightly scuff the surfaces.

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40 minutes ago, glens said:

Just drill holes and use twine.

Oh here we go!  Cotton?  Nylon?  Polypropylene? Jute?   Wait, I've got it... hemp surely sounds best.

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I am thinking there has to be an acoustically neutral dyed hot glue and will be on the lookout for it.

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