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USNRET

I've been a small block Chevy fan

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since I rebuilt the 283 in my '63 Biscayne. Trust me when I say more $$ was spent throughout the years but this sound is very cool. Not a Ford guy I just prefer (LOVE) the SB Chevy turning RPMs.

https://www.roadandtrack.com/car-culture/a29994025/custom-chevy-ls7-v-8-revs-to-11000-rpm/?fbclid=IwAR0CsADDyHZKeRSqz8zcgULnwkYZ_LBsgp4pik4qvjkqG2wVKrh5gfsPy2M

 

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It was not uncommon for Cadillac limousines (350 powered) to come in for service with a million + miles with no major repairs.

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2 minutes ago, jason str said:

It was not uncommon for Cadillac limousines (350 powered) to come in for service with a million + miles with no major repairs.

 

Somehow I just don't believe that, not even for a microsecond.

JJK

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11 minutes ago, JJkizak said:

 

Somehow I just don't believe that, not even for a microsecond.

JJK

 

Its a free country.

 

I was a master line technician for GM vehicles for years, many limos ran 3 shifts.

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I can offer only a personal testimony that my blueprinted '69 Z/28 302 would do 9000 RPM off the line. The 3rd member, u-joints, driveshaft, clutch / flywheel all suffered the consequences 

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I have a '78 L82 vette engine in my 52 pickup, and I entertained a conversation this evening with a guy who has a 57 Chevy 2 door with a 283, and I expressed the recent phenonium about "car's all going hybrid"... which necessitated another order of drinks... and we both came to the conscientious opinion that we'll be gone after 20 year's of various developments, ranging from the last hundred year time spam concerning kerosene and jet fuel, fuel injectors and fine gasoline, and 250 million car's on the road approaching  250,000 miles eventually (each) and then the invention of turning a cast iron v8 into an electric motor with a change of the head's, and putting some soon to be invented computer magnet where the carburetor used to be.... and replacing the gas tank with an electric fuel cell, and we both ordered another round of drink's, and it was time to go ,.... lol

  • Haha 2

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It is simply amazing how much HP (and RPM) can be extracted with modern technology. Pencil drilling dual 465 CFM Holley carb throttle plates to get the idle RPM below the transition circuit was an exercise that I did not enjoy since the car was my only daily driver to work.

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11 hours ago, jason str said:

 

Its a free country.

 

I was a master line technician for GM vehicles for years, many limos ran 3 shifts.

 

I was living in Madison when this was going on...

 

https://www.upi.com/Archives/1982/08/06/Cabby-drives-1956-Caddy-million-miles-seeks-world-record/4258397454400/

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16 minutes ago, Marvel said:


 

Must have been long ago.

 

The worlds record is held by a Volvo with over 3 million miles, for a passenger car anyways.

 

I can't recall the most miles i have seen on a car but those limos that came in for service were not all that old, just driven 24/7. The drivers said the only time it was not running is when it came in for maintenance.

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The first engine I rebuilt was a "DZ" 302 for a friends Z/28.

The small block Chevy has had so much engineering and generations it is quite remarkable how efficient in making power and great at fuel consumption it is.

I always liked how someone would tell me how the 350 Buick, 350 Pontiac and 350 Oldsmobile was the same engine in 1970. Each division had there own.

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21 minutes ago, Davis said:

The first engine I rebuilt was a "DZ" 302 for a friends Z/28.

The small block Chevy has had so much engineering and generations it is quite remarkable how efficient in making power and great at fuel consumption it is.

I always liked how someone would tell me how the 350 Buick, 350 Pontiac and 350 Oldsmobile was the same engine in 1970. Each division had there own.

 

Or that cubic inches (displacement) determine if its a big block or not.

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11 hours ago, USNRET said:

It is simply amazing how much HP (and RPM) can be extracted with modern technology. Pencil drilling dual 465 CFM Holley carb throttle plates to get the idle RPM below the transition circuit was an exercise that I did not enjoy since the car was my only daily driver to work.

New camshaft tech has helped alot with the help it received from CAD/CAM.

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26 minutes ago, mr clean said:

New camshaft tech has helped alot with the help it received from CAD/CAM.

Roller lifters was a big step to allow higher lift with faster ramp up.

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YeeHaw! Of course that LS7 is a completely different animal than the good old small block Chevy that we enjoyed for so many generations starting with the 1955 265 cubic incher and making it's way to 400 inches eventually.

The LS engines are completely different engines,the only thing they have in common is that they are small blocks but not the same old small blocks, that LS7 is 427 cubic inches of it and all aluminum to boot so a total beast even before any mods.

One of my Camaro club friends has a late model ZL1 with the factory supercharged LS7,it made 650hp bone stock.

The architecture of the LS blocks allows for bigger cams than the old small blocks,my little 2001 LS1 (346 inch) with 2004 LS6 (Z06 Vette ) heads is running a .617 lift intake and .624 exhaust cam which is a little lumpy but still streetable,my AC etc. still works and I don't have to burn off to leave a stoplight. lol

 

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22 hours ago, USNRET said:

I can offer only a personal testimony that my blueprinted '69 Z/28 302 would do 9000 RPM off the line. The 3rd member, u-joints, driveshaft, clutch / flywheel all suffered the consequences 

I drove one a lot back in the '70's,my roommate and good friend like to party a lot so I often drove his '69Z with him riding shotgun,bone stock we'd launch close to 7000 rpms.

I had a '69 with a big block Vette 427 solid lifter cammed monster at the time but his Z got a lot better gas mileage so we took it and parked mine a lot heh heh.

My built 427 would turn 8000 rpms,I usually shifted at 7500 when hammering on it ,some people don't believe  it but it's true.

I had an Accell dual point dizzy with a cable drive tach so I know it was accurate.

 

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} My ‘99 Silverado 5.3 with 62,000 miles broke a valve spring and lunched, locked her up. A goner. Replaced it with one with about 150K and crossing my fingers. Just a homeowners hauler but was in fantastic shape with ultra low miles when I bought it. Documented oil changes when I bought it and I change oil way more often than necessary. As they say, always an exception to the rule. 

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1 hour ago, richieb said:


} My ‘99 Silverado 5.3 with 62,000 miles broke a valve spring and lunched, locked her up. A goner. Replaced it with one with about 150K and crossing my fingers. Just a homeowners hauler but was in fantastic shape with ultra low miles when I bought it. Documented oil changes when I bought it and I change oil way more often than necessary. As they say, always an exception to the rule. 

Maybe have the heads done and a valve spring upgrade,should go another 150K.

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14 hours ago, Davis said:

The first engine I rebuilt was a "DZ" 302 for a friends Z/28.

The small block Chevy has had so much engineering and generations it is quite remarkable how efficient in making power and great at fuel consumption it is.

I always liked how someone would tell me how the 350 Buick, 350 Pontiac and 350 Oldsmobile was the same engine in 1970. Each division had there own.

When I was 16 I saved up for a first generation Camaro. I looked at a real 67 Z28 in about 1985.  The real deal. DZ 302, 12 bolt. front disc brakes, bigger sway bar up front, no AC, no z/28 emblem, regular headlights, regular flat hood, etc.  Needed a total restoration.  I didn't get it and I probably would have wrecked it if I did.  There were only 600 or 700 of them made. 

 

I wound up buying a 69 Camaro.  Wish I had some pics of the 67 car. 

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The 69 Z/28 RS package had the hideaway headlights. Cowl induction and rear spoiler were options, headers and traction bars came uninstalled in the trunk. Available, but rare, was the cross ram 2 x 4bbl intake.

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The small block Chevy engine was the most produced engine ever....until Honda's small 50cc engine passed it up.

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