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Luxman Solid State or Vacuum Tubes Amplifier


Vivek Batra
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10 hours ago, garyrc said:

 

[Certainly, an older K-horn, without a sealed back should be measured in 1/8 space, i.e. sealed (with rubber, or the like) in a trihedral corner.  It is recommended that even the new K-horns, with their factory sealed backs, still be placed in the close proximity of a corner, but now can be toed toward the listeners.  This didn't stop Stereophile from -- impertinently, both meanings intended -- measuring them outside, not in a corner, raised off a driveway on a furniture dolly.  Even then, they got 101 dB, 1m, 2.83v, exactly 4 dB below Klipsch's in-room result.]

 

 

And Gary, 101 db is such a strong result as it is. I cannot think of another speaker brand off the top of my head that i have read or researched over the years with that high of a sensitivity result. From a perspective of input power efficiency, clearly Klipsch Heritage line totally dominates the market. Especially the Khorns and LS models. For 70 years and counting.

 

After thinking about this off and on overnight, I can sort of envision where this Klipsch procedure began. The original Khorn was so dependent on positioning in a corner for its true musical delivery (LF). Corner loading to complete the cabinet design as PWK envisioned and engineered. So as the years roll on, and this became the Klipsch standard for data collection. As I said before, there is no industry standard, there is no industry governing body (that I am aware of), and Klipsch is free to publish their specs as they deem. I can respect that.

 

It surely doesn't hurt their marketing strategies/sales literature that their published sensitivity data is head and heels above any other home loudspeaker manufacturer. (with the tiny footnote denoting "typical room gain")

 

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9 hours ago, mikebse2a3 said:

There really aren’t any industry standards that satisfy all the variables that result into a sensitivity figure that is universally valid...!!!

 

The best we can hope for is a list of the conditions and assumptions made that result into a manufacture’s stated/advertised sensitivity specs. Then we might be able to make reasonable assumptions when we compare one manufactures specs to another’s which uses different methods and assumptions.

For example subtract -4db from Klipsch’s stated sensitivity value if room gain wasn’t used in another manufacturer’s stated value if all other variables are identical (which in the real world is very unlikely because the variables are many and there are no accepted standards industry wide from what I’ve been able to see so far).

 

Some other things to consider when sensitivity measurements are taken.

https://peavey.com/support/technotes/concepts/THE_LOUDSPEAKER_SPEC_SHEET_GAME_2005.pdf

 

miketn

 

 

 

 

Half space measurement is the industry standard unless things changed while i slept last night.

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9 hours ago, mikebse2a3 said:

There really aren’t any industry standards that satisfy all the variables that result into a sensitivity figure that is universally valid...!!!

 

The best we can hope for is a list of the conditions and assumptions made that result into a manufacture’s stated/advertised sensitivity specs. Then we might be able to make reasonable assumptions when we compare one manufactures specs to another’s which uses different methods and assumptions.

For example subtract -4db from Klipsch’s stated sensitivity value if room gain wasn’t used in another manufacturer’s stated value if all other variables are identical (which in the real world is very unlikely because the variables are many and there are no accepted standards industry wide from what I’ve been able to see so far).

 

Some other things to consider when sensitivity measurements are taken.

https://peavey.com/support/technotes/concepts/THE_LOUDSPEAKER_SPEC_SHEET_GAME_2005.pdf

 

miketn

 

 

 

 

Agreed, as I mentioned early on in this specific discussion (first post) that there are no industry test standards or governing body that I am aware of. So any audio manufacturer's published performance data is based on their test procedures, their honesty. Be it loudspeakers, receivers, amps, or AVRs. The Peavey paper is informative, factors/procedures which can influence/manipulate test results.

Never read that specific 4db room gain number anywhere from Klipsch or their spec sheets. Only since Dean mentioned it here yesterday.

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15 minutes ago, jason str said:

 

Half space measurement is the industry standard unless things changed while i slept last night.

 

Can you post a link to this industry standard you speak of? Like a pdf from the regulating body, or an article documenting specific test procedures?

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3 hours ago, polizzio said:

 

Can you post a link to this industry standard you speak of? Like a pdf from the regulating body, or an article documenting specific test procedures?

 

Half space measurements are the easiest to perform, why would you not use them and if they were not used it should be noted as such.

 

>link<

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42 minutes ago, jason str said:

 

Half space measurements are the easiest to perform, why would you not use them and if they were not used it should be noted as such.

 

>link<

 

Your linked document states there are 3 different proposals in play for audio equipment testing, one for the US, one for Germany, and one for China.

 

It then goes on to name four different actual testing methodologies for loudspeaker testing. Near field, far field, outside, and anecheoc room. Further substantiating my earlier claim there is no world wide agreed upon methodology. There isn't even a singular for the USA.

 

"The fate of IEC 60268-5 will be decided after the above new standards are published."

 

Everything in a state of flux, has been for 40 years that i am aware of. Manufacturers pick one methodology and run with it. 

 

I'm done with this topic here. We have collectively trampled the OP's original subject, and I concede I have been a major player in this.

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2 hours ago, ILI said:

 

Steve Huff wrote a really favourable review of this amp, a personal story, rather.

 

https://www.stevehuffphoto.com/2018/11/25/hi-fi-review-luxman-590-axii-integrated-amplifier-review-by-steve-huff/


 

He really approved of that Line Magnetic amp, it seems. Is there any way to get those serviced in the US? 

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I have run McIntosh (C15/MC162), a Luxman SQ38u, and a Luxman 550AXII with my Klipsch heritage speakers (Klipschorns-belles-Lascalas-Heresies, Cornwalls) and to my ear the Luxman class A will be difficult to beat. Like my buddy remarked upon hearing the 550AXII,  “you could hear a flea fart with that thing!” 
 

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12 hours ago, jwgorman said:

I have run McIntosh (C15/MC162), a Luxman SQ38u, and a Luxman 550AXII with my Klipsch heritage speakers (Klipschorns-belles-Lascalas-Heresies, Cornwalls) and to my ear the Luxman class A will be difficult to beat. Like my buddy remarked upon hearing the 550AXII,  “you could hear a flea fart with that thing!” 
 

Very much relieved to hear about 550AXII. I believe 590 would be improved over 550 and moreover I am buying this blindly, so I guess no need to worry. 🙂

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I got a dirt cheap Luxman M-113  power amplifier the mail today; $62 including shipping. That thing sounds a lot better than I expected! Even at 60w, it might be too much power for the situation (auxiliary system in a smaller room in the house). 

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1 hour ago, xoundmind said:

I got a dirt cheap Luxman M-113  power amplifier the mail today; $62 including shipping. That thing sounds a lot better than I expected! Even at 60w, it might be too much power for the situation (auxiliary system in a smaller room in the house). 

That's really a big heist.

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