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New home theater receiver

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Hi guys , Im looking for a new home theater receiver . I think I have it narrowed down to Integra DRX-4.2, Pioneer SC-LX701 , or Yamaha RX-A3060r  . I really dont know much about them  just trying to figure which would be the best one, They are all about the same price on https://www.accessories4less.com/.

They all have there good points and bad. I would like one that was user friendly if that helps. If anybody has used one or two of these I would like your feed back,

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All your choices look good. I like everything about my Pioneer SC-LX901, except that the supplied remote control does not have a learning function for other brand Blu-ray or CD players, etc. So I use a Harmony remote. The Pioneer stays cool during operation, a good feature if you place your equipment inside an enclosed cabinet.  

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Be sure to verify watts per channel in light of your speaker Power requirements requirements - at least 80% of your hungriest speaker’s RMS; if it can do Atmos without external amp etc.  I purchased from that company and had to return the receiver and they have a 20% restocking fee AND you reimburse their original shipping and pay for return shipping.  Yes it was a costly mistake!
 

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Yes, you need to verify you have enough power to drive all of your speakers to the levels you want.  Use this calculator: https://myhometheater.homestead.com/splcalculator.html  Get the speaker sensitivity off of the spec sheet of the speaker.  It will be listed as __(dB) per 2.83v per 1 meter.  Some speaker manufacturers will list in terms of watts, not volts, (2.83v = 1 watt into 8 Ohms).   In that case, put the dBs at 1 watt into the calculator.  The "power handling capacity" is largely irrelevant, contrary to what the Big Box stores sales people will tell you. 

 

If the receiver you are considering is specified at continuous watts per channel, all channels operating, 20 to 20,000 Hz, 8 ohms, at a lowish distortion level (0.1 or less), fine -- plug that figure into the calculator.  If it is listed at only 2 channels operating,  or at a narrower frequency range (sometimes, laughably, at 1K Hz) or at an impedance lower than 8 ohms, or at distortion higher than 0.1% (very common cop-outs), know that you may get only between 50% to 80% of its rated power in watts out of it on a continuous, all channel basis.

 

THX, Dolby, SMPTE, and others wants you to have a system that will produce 105 dB peaks at the listening position, and 115 dB through the subwoofer (which should have its own power).  If you always play it at less than theater level you don't need quite that much, but some movies have outrageous peaks.  The reflective nature of most home living rooms also work to slightly lessen the power needed, but, eventually you may want a treated room, which will need what the calculator tells you.

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I noticed you didn't list what speakers you have, that can affect how well a certain AVR will perform. Yamaha's are known to not play well with low ohm speakers, especially when you turn up the volume. I have a older Yamaha 100x7 AVR and it would clip at high volume driving low ohm (power hungry) speakers in 2 channel.

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I would recommend the Integra avr's myself. I got one a couple years ago and been running the hell out of it. 2 channel 5 channel both have held up. I also like how easy it is to setup next to other ones. 

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I'm going to purchase Marantz 1710 AV Receiver and pair with my Klipsch 51M bookshelf speakers. What should I add to system first

a Klipsch R-34C or a 10 Klipsch wireless sub? Ideally both but I'm building my system in stages. Music and TV are my main listening choices  I have 10ft ceilings, tile floor and limited space in this room.

 

Thanks in advance for any suggestions!

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For sound, of those three, Pioneer is my choice. I use a SC37 w/KLF and its about as good as any separates I've had up to 3k. It was the top of the line however. Onkyo next, although historically they rule the feature, operation, sound for the money and I have a few, with no issues. For all around feature /price Yamaha is fine. I personally don't like them for music or operation or claimed power but are dependable, I hear. If music is no consideration any of those are good, even great. If music matters, budget allows look at Anthem, Rotel and the like.

 

Last, if you know what you want ac4less has always been good for a deal. I have bought several avrs over the years, all still running. I did pay to return a Marantz that was well reviewed but I did not like at all. So it was on me, no reason they should pay. If you want to test drive maybe look local.......

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I’ve been running a Yamaha RX-A2060 since 2016 with good results.  I chose it over the 3060 because the extra 10 watts per channel (150 versus 140) and the 1 step better DAC chip wasn’t worth the extra $600 CAD, at least to me.

 

Since my main speakers are powered by external Yamaha power amps, the receiver powers only the surround and front centre speakers when in 5.1, plus the rear centre when listening in 6.1.  It has no trouble keeping up with the 1000 watt per channel Main Left and Right speakers, after settings the levels to match, obviously.

 

The sound quality of the 2060 is very good, as confirmed by several magazine and online reviews (haven’t time to find the links now), and it has more than enough features for me, like Pre Out sockets to allow the use of external power amps, plus a Phono input.  Internet Radio and Airplay are features I use nearly every day.

 

The free Yamaha control apps, AV Controller and MusicCast Controller, are really handy, so you don’t have to turn on the TV to browse or change Net Radio stations or change other settings.  They allow you to do nearly anything you could do on the TV screen, but it’s easier with a tablet than with a small phone screen, of course.  The phone runs on Android, while the tablet is an iPad, running iOS.

 

Overall, I’m very happy with it, but to be honest, I’ve been a Yamaha fanboy ever since I bought a Yamaha CR-600 stereo receiver in 1974.

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