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Please recommend reference quality CD's...

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which  preferably are EDM or female Vocalist! I don't know what other CD'ds offer a full range of reproduction?  Thank you!

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Use dynamic range database to check for versions of your favorite releases.

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Use dynamic range database to check for versions of your favorite releases.

This is useful to help the dynamic range portion of the experience, but not the spectral richness.

I don’t know what to do about that. I’ve wondered about it a lot.
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"Use dynamic range database"

 

and

 

"This is useful to help the dynamic range "

 

Ummmmmm with full respect gentlemen I truly have no idea to what you refer....clueless really, really, huh????

 

Would you please unpack these ideas and more fully describe? Thank you very much!  I dunno.... is this a software or a download or a hardware thingie 🙄? Thanks much!

 

 

 

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7 hours ago, 7heavenlyplaces said:
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Ummmmmm with full respect gentlemen I truly have no idea to what you refer....clueless really, really, huh????

 

Would you please unpack these ideas and more fully describe? Thank you very much!  I dunno.... is this a software or a download or a hardware thingie 🙄? Thanks much!

 

 

 

http://dr.loudness-war.info

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10 hours ago, 7heavenlyplaces said:

which  preferably are EDM or female Vocalist! I don't know what other CD'ds offer a full range of reproduction?  Thank you!

 

Seems you've rather melded criteria.  Assuming EDM means electronic dance music (a quick duckduckgo seems to confirm), it wouldn't be "re"production; and "female vocalist" doesn't cover much range apart from maybe Mariah Cary, but that's not really "real" either.  For top to bottom "real" reproduction you're going to need a big pipe organ accompanied by a full ensemble including some esoteric percussion stuff recorded rather well.  I don't have a recommendation and guess it wouldn't be your cup of tea if I did...

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16 hours ago, codewritinfool said:

This is useful to help the dynamic range portion of the experience, but not the spectral richness.  I don’t know what to do about that. I’ve wondered about it a lot.

I've found that recordings that have high DR ratings (based on SPL peak vs. average statistics) also seem to have been allowed to retain their originally recorded phase response. Ostensibly the reason for this is due to much lower levels of invasiveness in mixing and mastering activities used on the recording.  Doug Sax, whose Sheffield Lab (referenced above) and The Mastering Lab made a living wage over the years using this principle. 

 

I've found also that there seems to be a higher than normal correlation between high DR recordings and "spectral richness" in the form of a lush and inviting sound quality--which I've guessed is more correlated to phase fidelity in addition to SPL fidelity.  When I flattened the phase response of the loudspeakers that I listen to stereo recordings, suddenly violin sections of orchestras sound rich and compelling to a degree that might not be imaginable until you actually hear it. 

 

One of the issues that has been raised above is that the term "EDM" and hi-fi ("reference quality") seem to be mutually exclusive terms.  Aside from that point, female vocals are compelling because most of their rich harmonic content is above 1.2 kHz (yellow lines, below, and depending on whether the vocalist is a soprano or contralto, etc.), and usually must be recorded with thinner amounts of orchestration in order that their voices are not drowned out by the harmonics of "rich" spectral content instruments, notably solo violins and guitars, which compete harmonically with the female voice more so than male voices.

 

Interactive-Frequency-Chart.png

registers1.jpg

 

17 hours ago, 7heavenlyplaces said:

...which  preferably are EDM or female Vocalist! I don't know what other CDs offer a full range of reproduction?  Thank you!

 

So to answer your question, I find that vocalists whose albums rank high on the DR database chart are usually good bets.  Lower DR rated albums usually sound flat and un-involving.  Here is a chart showing the average DR ratings (crest factors) for different music genres as compiled by a researcher at B&O in a JAES article:

 

Ave Dynamic Range by Genre.PNG

 

Chris

 

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OP:  Please explain further what you are seeking advice about:

  1. Recordings that have wide dynamic range?
  2. Recordings that have wide frequency range?
  3. Recordings that are a good test for high fidelity reproduction?
  4. Recordings that are fun to “crank up”?
  5. Recordings that feature female voice, and are high-quality, and have significant dynamic range and frequency range?
  6. Recommendations for EDM (presumably, electronic dance music)?

 

At the outset, I’ll disclose that I’m a fan of classical music and opera.   I’m not knocking your taste in music – I respect the fact that music is deeply personal, and different people like different music. 

 

With that said – and in light of the fact that it’s snowing and I’m looking for an excuse to delay shoveling the driveway and sidewalks – I’ll offer some opinions.

 

Before I get into specific recommendations, I’ll point out an elephant in the room.   It’s a highly controversial elephant.   The Redbook CD (16bit/44.1kHz) was introduced to the marketplace almost 40 years ago.  CD is not state-of-the-art technology.  This is controversial because some people will cite Nyquist Theorem as an argument that CD is “all you need” … or CD “exceeds human hearing capability”.   (As though music can be reduced to frequency range and dynamic range.)   I won’t debate that here.  Rather I’ll offer my opinion, based on many years of experience:  My goal is for music reproduced in my home to remind me of my experiences in the symphony hall and opera house, and I find that modern hi-re recordings are usually the best at creating that illusion.

 

Now – for some specific recommendations:


 

Recordings that have wide dynamic range.

 

Hi-res recordings of modern performances (last 15 years or so) of classical music typically are not compressed, and can include significant dynamic range.   (OTOH, a lot of pop music is highly compressed, resulting in less dynamic range and less demand on a recording, and less demand on an amp and speakers.  In other words, with some pop recordings you can listen at a lower volume level and hear everything, because there are not soft and loud passages in the same composition or song.)

 

Modern hi-res consumer deliverables like Blu-ray, 24bit/192kHz download, and SACD are capable of delivering to the consumer the tremendous dynamic range of modern hi-res recordings of large-scale classical music. 

 

Provenance of the recording is extremely important.   You can’t make a silk purse from a sow’s ear.  For decades-old recordings, the quality of the original recording is the ultimate limiting factor.   A decades-old recording will not have state-of-the-art audio quality – even if it has been remastered. 

 

Anyone who has heard large-scale orchestral music performed live by a world-class orchestra in a world-class symphony hall (i.e., no sound reinforcement system) can relate to the tremendous dynamic range of some compositions.  For example, in Mahler Symphony 2, the 4th movement starts by a mezzo-soprano (or contralto) singing softly, and the 5th movement starts with the full orchestra (which might be 200+ musicians) playing fff.  Here’s an excellent Blu-ray of Mahler Symphony 2:

 

81H3aldwvHL._SX385_.jpg

 

IMO this Blu-ray recording of Mahler 2 is very enjoyable, and is an excellent overall test of a hi-fi system. 

 

Recordings that have wide frequency range.

 

As others have pointed out, a large-scale pipe organ can have tremendous frequency range.  A composition that combines a large orchestra with pipe organ represents a significant challenge for high-fidelity reproduction.  

 

I recommend Saint Saens Symphony No. 3 (Organ Symphony) as an example of a composition with wide frequency range.   Here’s an excellent recording that is available as 24bit/176kHz FLAC download from hdtracks.com.  (I think the SACD has a problem with too much bass – i.e., I think the SACD has defective mastering.)

 

91RxHtQnt3L._SX425_.jpg

 

 

Recordings that are a good test for high fidelity reproduction.

 

Each consumer must decide their goals for their hi-fi system.   One consumer may have a goal for their home hi-fi system to faithfully reproduce the natural timbre and dynamic range of an orchestra.  Another consumer may have a goal for their home hi-fi system to rattle the windows with thumping bass.    Another consumer may have a goal for their home hi-fi system to reproduce rock-concert sound-pressure-levels that will cause hearing damage.  Another consumer may have a goal for their home hi-fi system to play unobtrusively in the background. 

 

As I said earlier, my goal is for music reproduced in my home to remind me of my experiences in the symphony hall and opera house.

 

Both recordings that I recommended above involve natural orchestral instruments, and are therefore well suited for evaluating high-fidelity reproduction.

 

Here’s a Blu-ray box set that features excellent performances, and excellent audio and video quality, and is also an excellent value:

 

Rafael Frühbeck de Burgos Danish NSO

 

Ludwig van Beethoven: Symphonies Nos. 1–9

Joaquín Rodrigo: Concierto de Aranjuez

Hector Berlioz: Symphonie fantastique, Op. 14

Richard Strauss: Eine Alpensinfonie (An Alpine Symphony), Op. 64, TrV 233

 

 

41+EYqMSRUL.jpg

 

People who regularly attend live performances of classical music in its intended venue (i.e., no sound reinforcement system is used), know the natural sound of orchestral instruments such as a violin, oboe, trumpet, timpani, etc.  (Recognizing that there is some variance in sound due to hall acoustics, and the listener’s seating position in the hall.)  Large-scale orchestral music involves a variety of instruments whose timbre must be reproduced faithfully.   And when the sound of many orchestral instruments is blended together by the symphony hall's natural acoustics, the sound becomes very complex, which I think presents a challenge for reproduction of the music.

 

While my memory isn’t perfect, I have a pretty good idea how an orchestra sounds, and a pretty good idea how a string quartet sounds, and a pretty good idea how opera sounds, based on my regularly attending classical concerts.  (For the 2019-2020 season, I will attend more than 30 live classical concerts.) 

 

Classical music lovers therefore have a clear benchmark for how their music SHOULD sound – i.e., the live performance.  This is not the case for SOME pop music for which there never was a live performance.   Rather, for some (not all) pop music, various sources of sounds (some natural, some electronic) were cobbled together by producers and engineers using electronic tools, and unless the consumer was in the recording booth, or has the same speakers and amp that the engineers used when they created the recording, the consumer has no clear reference for how the music “should” sound.  How “should” a synthesizer sound?   How “should” deliberately distorted music sound?   (I understand that some people know the sound of various electric guitar/amp combinations, and I don’t discount that.)

 

IME recordings of small-scale folk music or jazz (e.g., Eva Cassidy, who I like) place far less demand on a music reproduction system (including the recording and home playback equipment) compared with large-scale orchestral music and large-scale opera.  With that said, I think that for folk and jazz that involves natural instruments, the concept of high-fidelity reproduction is relevant – if a sound reinforcement system wasn’t used during the live performance. 

 

OTOH, I question how relevant the concept of high-fidelity reproduction is to genres like electronic dance music, and rap.    I’m not criticizing these genres - I’m just asking this question:   How does the consumer know how such music SHOULD sound?   How do you know if the reproduced music is faithful to the original performance, if there never was a live performance?    Therefore, how relevant is the concept of “high fidelity reproduction” for pop music that was created electronically?

 

Recordings that are fun to “crank up”.

 

Who doesn’t like Bach’s Toccata & Fugue in D Minor, BWV 565?  (Ok, there are probably some people who don’t like this organ composition – but many people who don’t usually like classical music like this.)

 

This 24bit/96kHz FLAC download is excellent.  (Available from hdtracks.com)

 

71N-eYY6beL._SS500_.jpg

 

If you want to have some fun “cranking it up”, IMO this is a good choice.

 

Recordings that feature female voice, and are high-quality, and have significant dynamic range and frequency range.

 

Listen to Anna Netrebko’s performance of Casta Diva on this Blu-ray for an example of the power (and beauty) of the operatic soprano voice. 

 

An operatic soprano’s voice is generally more difficult to reproduce faithfully – at live concert levels – than a female folk singer’s voice.   (On this Blu-ray recording, if you find yourself cringing during loud passages, the problem is with your hi-fi system, not the recording.)

 

Elīna Garanča has a beautiful mezzo-soprano voice.   IMO, her performance of Mon cœur s'ouvre à ta voix is gorgeous.

 

There are many beautiful performances of opera snippets in this concert, and this Blu-ray disc has excellent audio and video quality. 

 

518u+bqRPqL._SY445_.jpg

 

Recommendations for EDM.

 

I can’t offer any advice.  I don’t listen to this genre.

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I never knew anyone listened to music based on gender.........On genre yeh.......

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13 minutes ago, Fish said:

I never knew anyone listened to music based on gender.........On genre yeh.......

 

Sometimes I prefer watching the female singers.  Here's pics of Anna Netrebko and Elīna Garanča:

 

Anna.jpg.3c67d18a39688c843e4ef580ea9dafc0.jpgElina_Garanca.thumb.jpg.42952c0959164da5dadd385496a554fb.jpg

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I never knew anyone listened to women based on genre....on gender yeh....

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Y'all are missing the point.  He asked about 2 genders 😉 of music, and symphony and organ were not part of it. 

 

I admit there is great power, emotion and impact in symphonic music.  It all occurs on side 2 of the 1812 Overture, if I can stay awake through side 1.   

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48 minutes ago, JohnA said:

Y'all are missing the point.  He asked about 2 genders 😉 of music, and symphony and organ were not part of it. 

 

I admit there is great power, emotion and impact in symphonic music.  It all occurs on side 2 of the 1812 Overture, if I can stay awake through side 1.   

 

Operatic sopranos, mezzo-sopranos, and contraltos are female vocalists.  Three of the five recordings I recommended include performances by female vocalists.

 

And the OP requested recordings that "offer a full range of reproduction".  (I've asked for clarification regarding what that means.)  That's why I suggested that operatic singers, and classical music, often involves greater dynamic range and frequency range compared with popular music.  (Particularly hi-res recordings.) 

 

As I said earlier, I respect the fact that different people like different music.  What one person views as a "niche", is another person's favorite genre.   If the OP doesn't find my comments useful, c'est la vie, perhaps someone else will.  Or not ...   🙂

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Well, from Sheffield Labs to the Sheffield based dance pop duo Moloko.  Excellent female vocals from Roisin Murphy!  Try Statues (worth seeking out the multichannel SACD btw).

For high energy EDM that's more creative and fun than the run of the mill try Infected Mushroom such as the album Vicious Delicious.

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13 hours ago, Thaddeus Smith said:

 

This is how I came to seek a specific version (there are many) of Mike Oldfield's Tubular Bells. A Japanese remaster Platinum SHM-CD. I have it, btw.

 

http://dr.loudness-war.info/album/view/82914

I'm going to have to get that... TY

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Maybe the likes of st. Germain? He gained alot of traction in the early 2000's for his infusion of house and jazz music, might not be what your looking but i feel like its worth listening to.  Edm is a very broad genre, and taste in edm varys widely among groups and location.  If your talking popular edm, florence and the machine - spectrum is a pretty powerful track, maybe lorent shark- still feel the rain.  Pm me if you want recomendations based on genre, i have tons of deep house, trance, and progressive tracks, but not so much edm.

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9 hours ago, JohnA said:

Y'all are missing the point.  He asked about 2 genders 😉 of music, and symphony and organ were not part of it. 

 

I was the first to mention it, with the caveats that I had nothing to recommend, and that he wouldn't like it even if I did.  I'd thought my post was self-explanatory.

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bis.se

I have several of their records, no compression what so ever. They have mostly classical music but if you like that, the audio quality is really good.

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