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Yo, saw dudes


rplace
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I have a Ridgid compound miter saw (I think it is called). The blade tilts left/right when looking at it straight one, as well as pivots 45 degrees when looking from above. It does not slide forward or back when cutting, (toward or away from you). Great for cutting 2x4s to length or base board molding, even crown molding. I've only ever used the standard (probably cheap) blade that came with it. Now I want to cut some 3/4" aluminum angle and I want it to be precise and clean.

 

I gather from looking on-line that I need a non-ferrous blade. However most of them seem to be 7-1/4inch or 10inch. Do I need a 12 inch blade since it seems to be designed for a 12 inch blade? Also, do they all have the same size hole in the center to mount them or do I need to know a bit more about my saw before I buy a blade. I can't seem to find a model number on it. I'm reasonably sure it is a 12 inch blade as my circular saw is 7-1/4 and my table saw is 10" and this is bigger....I've not removed it but putting a tape measure as close to the center as I can it is right at a 6" radius.

 

What say you lords of the saw?

 

Thanks!

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You need to compare the size of the arbor in your saw with what you want to use.  You also need to be sure the blade is rated for the rpm that your saw spins at.  You can use smaller blades than max on your saw but you may lose some reach and/or run into interference issues as you may have to lower the arm more than normal.

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Thanks @CECAA850 I figured if I got a smaller one I would not have the range to cut as wide/deep of material and have to lower the arm more, but since I only want to cut 3/4 inch angle I figured a 10 inch should be fine, no? It has a retractile guard around the blade when lifted, the mechanism on the saw pulls it away when the arm is lowered will that interfere with things if I put a smaller blade on it? 

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1 minute ago, rplace said:

Thanks @CECAA850 I figured if I got a smaller one I would not have the range to cut as wide/deep of material and have to lower the arm more, but since I only want to cut 3/4 inch angle I figured a 10 inch should be fine, no? It has a retractile guard around the blade when lifted, the mechanism on the saw pulls it away when the arm is lowered will that interfere with things if I put a smaller blade on it? 

It may have to be raised by hand slightly when you start the cut.

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10 minutes ago, CECAA850 said:

The nice thing about Lowes or Home Depot is that if you get it home and it doesn't appear that it will work you can always bring it back for a refund even if you have opened the blister pack.

 

I found a model number buried up under it. MS1250LZ1

1" arbor

4,000 RPM unloaded....I guess that means it spins at 4K when not being thrown up against a 2x4

 

So we are in agreement that as long as it has a 1 inch arbor and is rated at 4,000 RPM or greater I should be good with a 10" blade?

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39 minutes ago, rplace said:

It has a retractile guard around the blade when lifted, the mechanism on the saw pulls it away when the arm is lowered will that interfere with things if I put a smaller blade on it? 

They usually have a slot on the guard,  It can be raised manually if needed, i have done this at times to get a better look on certain cuts,  it's in the way just hold it up a little. Also if there is a dust collection bag on the back remove it when cutting the metal, wouldn't want to have it catch on fire.

22 minutes ago, rplace said:

 

I found a model number buried up under it. MS1250LZ1

1" arbor

4,000 RPM unloaded....I guess that means it spins at 4K when not being thrown up against a 2x4

 

So we are in agreement that as long as it has a 1 inch arbor and is rated at 4,000 RPM or greater I should be good with a 10" blade?

Yes your good, just never exceed the RPM, those blades are no fun when they fly apart, I had one do it on a cut off saw when cutting metal, not from RPM but it just self destructed, in a hurry. Might want to look at you present blade and check to make sure a 10'' would make the cut you want, probably will it the material is not to wide.

 

Wear safety glasses and let the blade do the work don't rush it.

 

edit; I forgot you said non  ferrous, your good, When I said fly apart i was thinking like a cut off blade.

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20 minutes ago, rplace said:

 

I found a model number buried up under it. MS1250LZ1

1" arbor

4,000 RPM unloaded....I guess that means it spins at 4K when not being thrown up against a 2x4

 

So we are in agreement that as long as it has a 1 inch arbor and is rated at 4,000 RPM or greater I should be good with a 10" blade?

Yep.  There's probably a "Not To Exceed (x)000 RPM" label somewhere on the blade.

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41 minutes ago, rplace said:

 

I found a model number buried up under it. MS1250LZ1

1" arbor

4,000 RPM unloaded....I guess that means it spins at 4K when not being thrown up against a 2x4

 

So we are in agreement that as long as it has a 1 inch arbor and is rated at 4,000 RPM or greater I should be good with a 10" blade?


As your amplifier fixer please adhere to the following -

- measure twice, cut once

- don’t cut off anything you will miss in the future

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This is a good time to use the original blade. 'Fine' blades, like 80+ teeth aren't the best with an alloy.

As far as precise goes, it's the saw setup not the blade. remove burrs with a file. Clean file with a

short piece of flattened 1/2 in. copper pipe.

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Assuming you were asking about cutting 3/4" X 3/4" X 1/8" standard hardware store angle.

Have you considered a fine tooth hacksaw? They work great. Clean up with a file loaded with chalk or soapstone after. If not, then...

 

Use the highest tooth count you can find. 10 teeth per diameter inch. Tooth count and configuration depends on the alloy and thickness. The thicker the aluminum material is, the fewer teeth you typically need. (TCG) Triple chip grind tooth profile with a negative tooth angle is best. Like -5 degrees. You can use a wax to lub the blade to prevent welding of the material to the teeth of the blade. The aluminum will melt instead of cut if you go to fast and will make for a very ugly cut. Make sure you have your entire body covered in clothing, gloves, face shield, hearing protection. Use a very firm grip or clamp. One side of the angle against the fence and the other side against the table. Maybe put up some cardboard to contain the metal shavings from getting everywhere. Cover any glass in the line of fire.

 

https://www.homedepot.com/p/DIABLO-12-in-x-96-Tooth-Laminate-Non-Ferrous-Metal-Cutting-Saw-Blade-D1296L/203162568

This high quality blade has everything you need for your project, meets the requirement of your saw, and is readily available. I was unable to find an economical alternative with adequate specs. 

 

You will not want to use this blade later for cutting crown molding or any lumber or boards down the road. Sorry you can not upgrade your current saw blade with this aluminum project of yours. There are wood/metal combo blades, but those are for ferrous metal. A blade made for composite decking like Trex could work if you were planning that type of work ahead. Aluminum is a specialty product and should be treated as such. I know a blade like this is expensive for small projects. I own many dozens of different types of saw blades, maybe even a hundred types. They are not a one fits all kind of thing. Sometimes you just use them once. Please do not buy a 10" saw blade for your 12" saw and attempt to cut aluminum with it. It won't cut all the way through anyway. You would need to build up your fence first. Please do not turn your saw blade backwards and cut with it. Leave that to the siding crew. It would not apply here. Buy the right tools, buy the right accessories, do it safe. If you would like to save yourself some money, get a smaller size saw for special projects and the blades will be much cheaper. Like this

https://www.homedepot.com/p/RYOBI-7-1-4-in-Miter-Saw-TS1144/306939256

plus this

https://www.homedepot.com/p/DIABLO-7-1-4-in-x-56-Teeth-Laminate-Non-Ferrous-Metal-Cutting-Blade-D0756N/202035231

 

I have been trained, educated, you can trust what I say to be true. I do not deny that there are other real alternatives and suggestions you will hear that will actually work, but those typically originate from having a lack of something else. Some of those can cause damage to material, damage to equipment, or even loss of bodily function. I am just trying to give the best advice I can.

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2 hours ago, 314carpenter said:

This high quality blade has everything you need for your project, meets the requirement of your saw, and is readily available. I was unable to find an economical alternative with adequate specs

 

Given the task at hand and I'll have it next time I need it I don't think that price is off the charts.

 

It is 1/6 thick, BTW. I make my living with my fingers so point taken about safety. Thanks!

 

I read online, dangerous I know, to apply painters tape to cut area to reduce flying bits. Will also brace with wood block and clamp to fence. 

 

I cut aluminum t-track with fine tooth hacksaw for a drill press table/fence. It was not pleasant and they were 90* cuts. These will be 45* for trim work. I'm hoping for cleaner results.

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How many cuts are you doing?

 

I don't know how much the proper blade might cost, but I have three fabrication shops within 4-5 miles of me.  If I needed something done "to perfection" (to use a phrase) I could take it to one of them.  I'd probably get a more accurate cut....  won't necessarily save on expenses.... 

 

If you're doing a bunch, might be worth buying the tools....if it's a cut or two....might be worth driving down the road??

 

Heck, I'm getting ready to have one of these fabricator guys come to my house, bring his welder because I've got a sheared steering bolt on my industrial backhoe so it's not going anywhere and I can't transport it.  

 

I've got my brother in laws welder sitting here right now as I type....but I've never welded and need this done "right" the first time.....  so out comes the wallet.

 

 

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rplace, you could just run with the big dogs and buy one of these. I have cut a mountain of steel and aluminum structural steel with one. Really nice clean cuts too.

 

https://www.ebay.com/itm/DeWALT-DW872-14-Multi-Cutter-Metal-Cutoff-Cut-Off-Saw-Tool/201731537354?epid=28024812233&hash=item2ef822f9ca:g:S-sAAOSwD39aaQYE

DeWALT-DW872-14-034-Multi-Cutter-Metal-Cutoff-Cut-Off-Saw-Tool

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24 minutes ago, JL Sargent said:

rplace, you could just run with the big dogs and buy one of these. I have cut a mountain of steel and aluminum structural steel with one. Really nice clean cuts too.

 

https://www.ebay.com/itm/DeWALT-DW872-14-Multi-Cutter-Metal-Cutoff-Cut-Off-Saw-Tool/201731537354?epid=28024812233&hash=item2ef822f9ca:g:S-sAAOSwD39aaQYE

DeWALT-DW872-14-034-Multi-Cutter-Metal-Cutoff-Cut-Off-Saw-Tool

The carbide tipped blade teeth are the secret to cutting metal. I have cut a lot of 1/2" aluminum plate with a skill saw and carbide blade and the hot little chips can be exciting but the cut happens fast and as accurate as you are. You are cutting thin material subject to snaging and bending so feed carefully and slowly. Arbor hole size should not be a problem just match what you have and the blade you need will be out there. More teeth with smaller gullets is better and will cost more. Fewer teeth is cheaper and will up the chance of snagging your material. A dab of transmission fluid on your cut area will help things feed better also.

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On 6/3/2020 at 7:52 AM, Coytee said:

I've got my brother in laws welder sitting here right now as I type

As you know just because you have a welder does not mean it will weld without a welder running the welder. If you are not in a hurry and can send pieces I might be able to make you a new one. I say this without having any idea what your part looks like.

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