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Ideal room dimensions for Klipschorns?

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What’s the ideal room dimensions for Klipschorns? Did Mr. PWK ever mention it?

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What’s the ideal room dimensions for Klipschorns? Did Mr. PWK ever mention it?

Yes, at least in the form of a graph. Look for the “Dope From Hope” series and it is in there somewhere. Maybe someone here can give you a better lead than that.
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3 hours ago, codewritinfool said:

Volume 9, number 1.  February 1968.  Doesn't talk about dimensions, but rather W x D ratios.

 

 

DFH_ratio.pdf 263.47 kB · 11 downloads

 

Thank you.

 

I thought he had mentioned actual room dimensions at sometime that would be ideal for Klipschorns and a high ceiling. I think I remember it being discussed on here a few times, but I can’t find it using the search function. I bookmark things like that, but lose them when changing to more modern technologies to get onto the Internet.

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the first KHORNS were sold as MONO speakers    , and you can see the rooms as fitting for any kind of  home ----and  the 3  speakers stereo  system with a Cornwall  was for a larger room

 

o -Pin on KLIPSCH HISTORICAL PHOTOSimage.jpeg.914cd25b66a1f027e91936443d8c1bb1.jpeghttps://i.pinimg.com/originals/10/b6/28/10b6289e983df850bdcbae2e1fece0ba.jpg

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A minimum size of approximately 20'x30' works well. At those WxL a 16' ceiling works well.

 

There is something PWK mentioned called the "half-room" principal. It applies well in this situation because few of us have 16' ceilings. So, if you use 8' instead of 16' you'll be half way there. The result being that any modes in the vertical plane will be about + or - 3dB less "ideal". This is just a general guideline. If you have vaulted ceilings all the better.

 

 

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Keep in mind that the room proportions Klipsch was referring to affect mainly the bass frequencies.

 

As the wavelengths get longer at lower frequencies, the wavelengths become longer than any dimension of the room and begin to interact with the room "modes" - resonances  - causing exaggerated anomalies in frequency response.

 

As the frequencies get higher, the wavelengths grow shorter and don't interact with room modes as much if at all.

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20 minutes ago, RandyH said:

the first KHORNS were sold as MONO speakers    , and you can see the rooms as fitting for any kind of  home ----and  the 3  speakers stereo  system with a Cornwall  was for a larger room

 

That is an interesting and important point!

 

Think about it. One large full range speaker, in a room corner, with wide enough polar response to cover, basically the entire "listening area" equally - just like if you were sitting in a concert hall - looking at the stage. Everyone hears basically the same "source".

 

When stereo came along, it destroyed all that. Now we have the proverbial "sweet spot". There is really only one "ideal" listening location. And that's why PWK referred stereo as "diluted". And it's also probably why some people still prefer mono sound reproduction.

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Great points made by all. Remember that my Klipschorns are in an 11 x 9 room on the long wall, which puts the sweet spot about the size of my head, centered on the opposite wall.

Klipschorns were my dream since 1986. I have a beautiful 1968 pair. I have no other choice on placement. Even so,

I think they sound GLORIOUS.

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1 hour ago, codewritinfool said:

 I have a beautiful 1968 pair. ---

I think they sound GLORIOUS.

 real wood --- they must be heavy

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1 hour ago, codewritinfool said:

Great points made by all. Remember that my Klipschorns are in an 11 x 9 room on the long wall, which puts the sweet spot about the size of my head, centered on the opposite wall.

Klipschorns were my dream since 1986. I have a beautiful 1968 pair. I have no other choice on placement. Even so,

I think they sound GLORIOUS.

 

I used to have a 9 X 11.33 room (!) for my Klipschorns (but with an about 14 foot ceiling).  They, too, sounded GLORIOUS from my single, centered seat.  I had a wall covered with 4" Sonex behind me, and a good rug on the floor.  The K-horns are now in a big room, and sound better in 5 other seats, but about the same in the sweet spot.

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I searched the Internet and it listed a link to another site that had someone posting it is 26 X 18 with a 13 foot ceiling, but I have no way to verify it’s correct.

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I'm totally going from memory, but as I was reading this from the first post I was thinking 26' was the width between khorn corners. I had no recollection of depth or ceiling height. So your 26 above jives with my memory from buying mine in 2004.

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I have had my K-horns in 5 different room configurations and the worst was an open ceiling room with 17 foot dimensions. The resent location is 24 x 12 open ceiling.

JJK

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It states in DFH referenced above the "studio" in Hope was 10 x 16 x 25 ft. which is supposedly near the Golden Mean and is what I modeled my new room by. Mine is 9.5 x 16 x 26. 

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Taking me back to some recording studio fun a few years ago....

 

The short version of this is the farther away from being mathematically related your room dimensions are to each other, the less issue you should have with room modes.  The 'Golden Ratio' dimensions are pretty good at achieving this.  There are a few other sets of 'pretty good' ratios out there with some searching.

 

In our situation, we had a 16' x 16' x 8' room (1/2 of a cube) with a suspended ceiling.  It was Gawd-Awful for attempting to record music.  Then I remembered some tricks from practicing tuba in small rooms with suspended ceilings:  Open up some of the ceiling tiles.

We pulled tiles out of the corners, and a few in the center.  Somehow, that got the volume in the ceiling above the tiles resonating out-of-phase with the main room and cleared up a LOT of the mud.

 

Buddy had his head in a mix, trying to make it better, when I pulled the first corner tile out.  He almost broke his neck, that head snapped around so fast "WHAT DID YOU DO!??!?" , it made that big of a difference.

 

something for the forum to file away in their collective memory banks.

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