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Edgar

Sunday Morning Blues

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1 hour ago, Edgar said:

 

 I'm no different than anybody else.

 -----Funny  -Einstein said the same words , albeit in mathematical terms -

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Loneliness is a feeling. Feelings

are totally legitimate.

Tomorrow you will be not as blue.

It will be a new day.

Good fortune...

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Edgar, thanks for sharing.

 

It helps keep things in perspective.

 

No one needs to be alone unless that is what they truly want.

 

The expression “this too shall pass” comes to mind.

 

Another favourite of mine is “if you’re telling the story, it could always be worse!”

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1 minute ago, geoff. said:

Another favourite of mine is “if you’re telling the story, it could always be worse!”

 

Hey, I like that!

 

Thanks everyone for your comments. I don't know what it was about attempting to mow the lawn this morning that made it all suddenly overwhelm me. It's been a really tough two years, and there are no signs of it getting better soon. But at least I'm still here to tell the story. 

 

Before my heart surgery, the surgeon tried to cheer me up by saying that I had a 90% chance of survival. I just laughed -- if someone told you that you had a 10% chance of dying on your drive to work, you'd call-in sick that day. But here I am.

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I'm closer to 72 y/o than 71.  I get overwhelmed sometimes as well. Lost both parents, two sets of in laws, my wife, my best male and female friends and there are situations when I was part of a group and I'm the lone survivor.  Sometime a twinge of survivors guilt but that's life and I'm still plugging on.  Not the stamina I once had but I still am looking ahead to see what venture is next.  The bones creak when I get up and down but never any severe health problems.  I still have my teeth, hair, and pretty good hearing and when I recall what my wife went through, a juvenile diabetic, who survived three organ transplants, and major heart surgery..............

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18 hours ago, dtel said:

But the main thing is to keep moving

I now keep three active dogs happy in addition to living with my wife.  The three-dog thing wasn't planned but rather just happened (we really wanted just one).  They cause me to get out of my chair at least once every 20 minutes or so during daytime hours (right up to turning in for the night).  If you feel alone, consider a four-legged roommate.  They bring a lot more joy than discomfort in my experience.  If it weren't for them it would be VERY quiet around here. 

 

I don't really care when someone tries to tell me that my dogs are too unruly, perhaps not having complete obedience when the front door opens (and the joy that ensues from greeting visitors--or at least used to before March) or we're on the daily walk (365 days a year) and they get a little "territorial" when other dogs pass.  I don't care that others don't understand that the dogs aren't for them but for me and my wife.  Screw what others think.  Our "children" are critical to my well being because my tendency would otherwise to get interested in something and not move from my chair for perhaps a couple of hours or more.  That's the start of something bad when that occurs.  "Keep moving" is more than just an admonition, it's built in now to the daily routine.  And it's working perfectly.  I've got physical complaints, and so does my wife (she's had both shoulders replaced and spinal fusion, etc.), but all in all it's been good. My wife is a bit older and has been taking the brunt of the "bad luck" over the past 6 years or so.

 

I've been retired from a paying job for over 6 years now. I started at ~58.  I think that if I'd continued to work, my health would in much worse shape now.  I know that most folks in the 50s-60s would like to retire and do what they want but can't, financially.  I was lucky and could--and did.  I don't like to travel so that makes things easier.  My wife travels with her long-time friends, so we're both happy.  I take one prescription pill per day and I've had no surgery other than skin cancer removal (too much sun as a kid lifeguarding).  I hope to continue this for as long as possible.  It's been working. 

 

The biggest issue that I've got is that time passes much too quickly and I don't feel the passing of time like others might (an aspect that seems to be particularly hereditary/familial).  The last 6 years have gone by in a flash (actually the last 20).  I do specific things to keep rooted in today's events and the passing of time.  The key for me is that I can finally do what I want, not what someone else wants me to do.  Mental health is just as important as physical health.  Recently, I've been collecting CDs from the 1960s-2010s to fill in my popular music library (FLAC).  I've been analyzing how I like certain types/titles of popular music as defined by Billboard charts, etc.  I've found some very interesting things--perhaps I'll share some from those insights.  My musical tastes keep changing but really never have been focused on Billboard charts, at least since I was 13.  I've never really liked electric guitar (rock, that is), particularly hard rock and its sub-genres, but much of this was due to poor mastering quality of the music, etc.  I've changed that aspect over the past 5 years via demastering to remove the offending EQ and noise, etc.

 

I've spent time with the loudspeaker thing (as you know), but I've found myself drifting away from that now that I've gotten everything that I know to do (or I can think of, at least) under control or improved to a level I can afford or tolerate in terms of the maintenance required.  The hi-fi thing will likely will change again, but perhaps not soon.  Music is the focus now...finally.  Unfortunately, I've found that music forums are ruled by...well...strange people with strange ideas.  I'll have to continue my search among them, or perhaps I'll start one in this forum if no other good forums can be found.

 

All of the above I shared here for your benefit, Greg--believe it or not.  I've found that platitudes don't really help--but specifics do.  Perhaps some of the above might be useful.  Oh, and find some neighborhood kid on Nextdoor to mow your lawn for a low price.  That's something that I've done for ~22 years now (avoiding allergy symptoms).  It's worth it.  Or get yourself one of those iRobot mowers to take care of 95% of it.  Life's too short.

 

Chris

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6 minutes ago, Chris A said:

IOr get yourself one of those iRobot mowers to take care of 95% of it.  Life's too short.

 

Chris

great idea ---------

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8 minutes ago, Tarheel said:

I'm closer to 72 y/o than 71.  I get overwhelmed sometimes as well. Lost both parents, two sets of in laws, my wife, my best male and female friends and there are situations when I was part of a group and I'm the lone survivor.  Sometime a twinge of survivors guilt but that's life and I'm still plugging on.  Not the stamina I once had but I still am looking ahead to see what venture is next.  The bones creak when I get up and down but never any severe health problems.  I still have my teeth, hair, and pretty good hearing and when I recall what my wife went through, a juvenile diabetic, who survived three organ transplants, and major heart surgery..............

wow --------go man go -

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5 minutes ago, Chris A said:

If you feel alone, consider a four-legged roommate.  They bring a lot more joy than discomfort in my experience.  If it weren't for them, it would be VERY quiet around here. 

 

Oh, how I miss my dogs. I had two rescue Akitas that I adopted as young adults. They've both been gone for nearly a decade, and it seems like a lifetime ago. Unfortunately since then I have not been in a situation where I could have pets -- largely out of my control.

 

Quote

I've been "retired" from a paying job for over 6 years now. (I started at ~58.)  I think that if I'd continued to work, my health would in much worse shape now--I'm sure.

 

Funny you should mention that. Right now the biggest problem in my life is my paying job. But because I invested so much in my startup business, which unfortunately did not succeed, I am not in a position to quit.

 

Quote

The biggest issue that I've got is that time passes much too quickly and I don't feel the passing of time like others might (an aspect  that seems to be hereditary from familial traits).

 

No, that's just part of getting older. I'm experiencing it myself.

 

Quote

I've spent time with the loudspeaker thing (as you know), but I've found myself drifting away from that now that I've gotten everything that I know to do (or I can think of, at least) under control or improved to the level I can afford or tolerate in terms of the maintenance required.

 

In the middle of my career I worked in the audio industry, and loved it. My department was laid-off by Electro-Voice in 2000, it's been a struggle ever since. I have not found a way to get back into audio, other than at the hobby level, and the work that I have been able to find bores me.

 

Quote

All of the above I shared here for your benefit, Greg--believe it or not.  I've found that platitudes don't really help--but specifics do.  Perhaps some of the above might be useful.

 

Thank you, Chris.

 

Quote

Oh, and find some neighborhood kid on Nextdoor to mow your lawn for a low price.

 

Actually it wasn't a problem until the foot surgery. I kind of enjoy it.

 

Thanks,

Greg

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I have had some lonely times in life. I’m an introvert and never did go in for ‘social’ scenes. I looked and found volunteer roles in the community to try and bridge into some connections. They did keep me busy and provided some purpose but they did not gain me connections. I started going to gyms and found some similar people’s. Eventually I survived the gap and was stronger for the endeavor.

 

 Health status is an inescapable conundrum for us elders. Soon enough we’ll all be shopping for Depends w/splatter guard 😔😗. For myself I try to keep balance in my low keyed life. I have a creative hobby. I do go to the gym regularly. We must reinvent ourselves as need be. I am not what I once was. I’m at least 3 inches shorter (hate gravity), I creak, I do not sleep 8 hours, I can’t hear well. But I do keep busy and I am fairly content with all my deficits and aches and pains........  and my dog loves the hell out of me.
 

Low points in life are inspirations to reach higher. Go for it.

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"Edgar:

Sucks to get old.  Takes longer to recover, things stay sore longer, eye sight blurs a little more and friends seem to disappear.  HOWEVER, Klipsch still sound great, you are working less and you have not taken the "dirt nap".  Enjoy.  65 and still swimming 150 miles a year !!  I have no plans to slow down nor turn my Klipsch down !!!

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19 minutes ago, Seadoc said:

Sucks to get old. 

 

It wouldn't be so bad if parts didn't keep falling off.

 

Quote

HOWEVER, Klipsch still sound great, you are working less and you have not taken the "dirt nap".  Enjoy.  

 

Speaking of working less ... I just started a two-week mandatory pandemic furlough. Frankly I don't ever want to go back. That may be the root cause of today's Sunday Blues.

 

Judging from what I heard at the Bonehead Class last October, Klipsch just keep sounding better. I need to find a way to procure some Cornwall IVs. Trouble is, I run a 5-channel system. When a pair is beyond my finances, five is out of the question.

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Different parts of my body are different ages. Fortunately my state of mind (not mental capacity, that has aged significantly)) is still around 12-14. If not for that I would be a cynical, sarcastic curmudgeon. Oh wait......

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1 hour ago, Edgar said:

 

It wouldn't be so bad if parts didn't keep falling off.

 

 

Speaking of working less ... I just started a two-week mandatory pandemic furlough. Frankly I don't ever want to go back. That may be the root cause of today's Sunday Blues.

 

Judging from what I heard at the Bonehead Class last October, Klipsch just keep sounding better. I need to find a way to procure some Cornwall IVs. Trouble is, I run a 5-channel system. When a pair is beyond my finances, five is out of the question.

 

Ask Klipsch if they sell the Cornwall as a decorator. It saves a ton of money. Mine was something like $250.00 in 1965.

 

JJK

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8 hours ago, Edgar said:

 

What a sobering thought.

 

To someone who lives their whole life alone (like me), old age comes as a complete surprise. I still feel like I'm 25 inside, even though the person looking back at me in the mirror indicates otherwise.

 

Email me a copy, I'll read it.

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17 minutes ago, JJkizak said:

 

Ask Klipsch if they sell the Cornwall as a decorator. It saves a ton of money. Mine was something like $250.00 in 1965.

 

$250 in 1965 equates to $2034 in 2020. https://www.usinflationcalculator.com

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12 minutes ago, Thaddeus Smith said:

 

Email me a copy, I'll read it.

 

If I tried to write my memoirs, I'd bore myself.

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Okay.  We've all had tragedy, and we all need sympathy.  It is good for you to share with us.

 

But in the end we have to strap on a pair and be a man.

 

Ann Landers had some correspondent who was moaning.  Ann replied: Count your blessing and quityerbitchen.

 

King James Bible
Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with thy might; for there is no work, nor device, nor knowledge, nor wisdom, in the grave, whither thou goest.

 

I take that as advice that our work is the solution to loss and frustration.

 

Sorry if I'm preachy.

 

WMcD

 

 

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1 minute ago, WMcD said:

But in the end we have to strap on a pair and be a man.

 

Sure. But sometimes one just needs to stop and catch their breath.

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