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Help! Cornwall IV vs RF7 III for electronic music


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The 2021 node has a different chip. I use its internal DAC and go via chinch into my C22CE pre. The new Node is a very significant increase over the Node 2i when using the internal chip. I don't know if there is any difference between 2021 Node and Node 2i when using an external converter.

 

https://www.whathifi.com/reviews/bluesound-node-2021

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I too started my journey with less expensive value amps and AVR’s. 
 

I can tell you that nothing opened my system up more than ditching the AVR as a pre and getting a high quality integrated or pre/amp combo. 
 

I started with older Linn amps (coming from NAD and Denon) and what a jump. 
 

them onto PS Audio D class. 
 

now I have Parasound Halo (new “+” gear) and it’s light years ahead of where I started. 
 

those CW IV’s need clean clear power and a great source to open up. 
 

 

just my 2c

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I have a very basic setup but people make the trip to hear the S-MWM's time and again. PC as server to Xilica to bi amped Crown XLI800's and then to speakers. What allows me to get really good sound is that the realtek soundcard has the high definition driver installed from the realtek website and does not use the factory crummy one. Also using an ssd hard drive eliminates the faint hum that sometimes can happen with spinning hard drives. System is dead quiet and music is superb and limited only by the recording quality.

 

  Occasionally  a visitor asks to see the back of my rack for my setup. I know what is coming next and I get to tell them no dac or any other special stuff hidden away.  I suppose I might squeeze a bit more quality out of what I have with more gear but quite frankly I have no real desire to improve on what I have right now. And simple is much better for the wallet and headache reduction in setup and maintaining the pile-o-gear.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Hi Cornwall IVs vs RF7-III,

Since you've been asking, I might as well put in my two cents re the two speaker designs. I believe you said you currently own both the newer Tower type and the Cornwall IV, so why not keep both? I have both styles and I've assembled two separate systems, one for each speaker type. Variety is the spice of life!

 

Another thing I'd say is that if your music is electronic dance music, I'd go with the RF7 - except that you're gonna be running a pair of subs with your mains, so in that case, anything goes!

 

Isn't electronic dance music kinda top-end/low-end like the Drum & Bass genre I've recently fallen in love with? I've listened to D&B with both Heritage and Tower models and I must say that the towers put out that "Oomph!" type of Bass more than the Heritage [to see why, look at the travel distance on the two models' respective woofer cones while they're playing a bass line].

 

I always switch to my tower system to listen to D&B for this very reason  [plus, I'm driving my towers with a powerful vintage Japan-made Marantz beast I bought used, and you want lots of solid state grip to properly project loud, powerful bass [hint: don't sell your big Emotiva amplifier!]

[Another hint: look at the power-handling specs of RF7 vs Cornwall]

 

And since you have both Heritage and Tower, you should look at eventually buying a used tube amp as Shakey advised and pair it with the Cornwalls. The Cornwalls are more revealing of their upstream components, so you'll get a more rewarding sound change with a Heritage/tube/class "A" combination than with the Tower [use your Emotiva for Towers] and besides, the Heritage stuff was specifically designed for use with tubes.

 

If you get into music that has a lot of vocals and acoustic instruments, the Cornwalls will DEFINITELY prove superior to your Towers. Don't get me wrong, the towers sound good with vocal/acoustic, but aren't in the same league with the Heritages when it comes to tonality - especially mid/upper bass and mid-range tonality - which is a big reason they're still so popular [along with higher sensitivity and better dynamics].

 

Speaking of Heritage advantages, if you're going to do a lot of low volume listening to electronic, or any other genre, for that matter, then DEFINITELY use the Heritages for this. I don't think there's ever been a speaker made that can compete with Klipsch Heritage at the lower/moderate volume levels.

 

Lastly, if I misread your post and you DON'T currently own both, I'd highly advise you to go online and score a pair of used Heresies. You mentioned money constraints and I feel your pain because I'm in the same boat [I'm not wealthy], so I can assure you there are super deals on mint-condition Heresies out there. The Heresies alone are awesome-sounding, but teamed up with your two subs, even the [relatively] little Heresies [not to mention Cornwalls!] will provide unbeatable sound. I'd put a pair of sub-matched Heresies/Cornwalls up against ANY OTHER SPEAKER AT *ANY* PRICE.

 

But without subs, I'd always favor the Towers for loud, bass-heavy music and for most all other music styles I go strongly for Heritage.

 

But the main thing is to own both types. I'll never regret doing that, esp since I bought used, therefore I got two clean, unscratched systems for the price of one.

 

Hope this helps!

 

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