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Floor Standing Speaker Placement


JoeJoeThe3rd
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This is for any floor standing speaker placement but mainly I am curious about what is some of the best positions for the best performance for the rf7iii. Should I have them right at my face, towed in like crazy or towed out, what the best all around. Currently I have them slightly towed out from pointing directly at me. 

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Rule of thumb would suggest having them on either side of the TV in an equilateral triangle, subs to the outside.  Toe-in slightly, point the R speaker to the left ear, other speaker likewise L to R ear.  Getting them away from the back wall a foot or two is also a good idea if you have the space.

 

https://www.cnet.com/how-to/how-to-position-your-speakers-perfectly/

 

All I just wrote is just to get you started.  I suggest you try variations for yourself, see what sounds best to you.  @wuzzzer ^^^ is spot on with what he said about distance from speakers, room characteristics, etc.

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1 hour ago, wvu80 said:

Rule of thumb would suggest having them on either side of the TV in an equilateral triangle, subs to the outside.  Toe-in slightly, point the R speaker to the left ear, other speaker likewise L to R ear.  Getting them away from the back wall a foot or two is also a good idea if you have the space.

 

https://www.cnet.com/how-to/how-to-position-your-speakers-perfectly/

 

All I just wrote is just to get you started.  I suggest you try variations for yourself, see what sounds best to you.  @wuzzzer ^^^ is spot on with what he said about distance from speakers, room characteristics, etc.

I actually don’t really like how it sounded when I had them like that. And I use my rc64iii as my center a lot of the time when listening to music anyway so it would be basically pointless to have them set up like that since I’m using a center for music as well. And even without using a center I thought it Definitely took away from the entire experience and sound quality of them, but I didn’t mess with it that extensively and might try again. But from trying it I don’t see why people would listen to them like that from what I’ve learned what the benefits are suppose to be from having them set up like that I just didn’t see or hear any benefits.  I have the tweeters pointed about a foot or so away fro each shoulder, right speaker pointed like a foot or two to the right of my shoulder and so on. I found that sounds amazing. Really the way you have them set up is more forgiving than what people say for sure. Having then like that I get all the benefits of having them pointed straight at you but just a little smoother along with others. And then center imaging and entire soundstage is so on point and vaster than anything I’ve ever heard and they disappear immaculately/superfluously.

3 hours ago, wuzzzer said:

Depends on your room, how far away you sit, how far apart the speakers are from each other, etc.  You'll just have to experiment and find what sounds best to you. 

I have them about 110” apart from the middle of the tweeter to the middle of the other tweeter. and I sit about 135” away from them in my most comfortable listening position . I’ve already found how I like how they sound. Wanting to know if there’s a rule of thumb that sounds beat for these speaker. I have them perfectly symmetrical inside the room. And my room is 13 by 15 with a hallway that extends to the door to the bathroom making it 13 by about 20 with 8’ ceilings. With the way my room is I only have them about 16 inches away from the wall. Also, from the front of the tweeter is exactly 25” away from the side of the wall.  And I haven’t noticed any problems with it that distance or boomyness. But if I did move them out what benefits should I expect to notice in doing so. 

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This is for any floor standing speaker placement but mainly I am curious about what is some of the best positions for the best performance for the rf7iii. Should I have them right at my face, towed in like crazy or towed out, what the best all around. Currently I have them slightly towed out from pointing directly at me. 

Toe them in to where the axis meets just in front of you. I have Heresys and they are stuffed into the corner with 45 degrees toe in.


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This is for any floor standing speaker placement but mainly I am curious about what is some of the best positions for the best performance for the rf7iii. Should I have them right at my face, towed in like crazy or towed out, what the best all around. Currently I have them slightly towed out from pointing directly at me. 

Toe them in to where the axis meets just in front of you. I have Heresys and they are stuffed into the corner with 45 degrees toe in.


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8 hours ago, wvu80 said:

Rule of thumb would suggest having them on either side of the TV in an equilateral triangle, subs to the outside.  Toe-in slightly, point the R speaker to the left ear, other speaker likewise L to R ear.  Getting them away from the back wall a foot or two is also a good idea if you have the space.

 

https://www.cnet.com/how-to/how-to-position-your-speakers-perfectly/

 

All I just wrote is just to get you started.  I suggest you try variations for yourself, see what sounds best to you.  @wuzzzer ^^^ is spot on with what he said about distance from speakers, room characteristics, etc.


I had to LOL at that. Not everyone has a tv between their speakers. And surely the better for it.

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In an effort to avoid confusion, it’s helpful to refer to room walls relative to the speaker that’s nearest to them.  Accordingly, the wall behind the front speakers is the front wall, and the wall behind the rear speakers is the rear or back wall.

 

“Side walls” is pretty clear to everyone, and the side wall that’s nearest to the Left speaker (Main or Surround) is the Left wall.  Same rules for the right wall.

 

That’s simple, right?  This way, we’ll avoid describing rooms as having “rear walls” behind both the front and rear speakers.  That would be an odd room.

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The loudspeakers are correctly set up when the Loudspeaker as acoustical source can no longer be localized. This means that the stage front ,depth and width can be clearly located between the L's and even mixing effects can be heard to the left and right of the speakers.

 

The singer always stands in front of the band, at least during studio productions or on the same level with the band. The solos of certain instruments must be clearly locatable and delimitable.The whole sound spectrum should be balanced at the listening position, from brilliance to sub, and should not have any emphasis in certain FQ spectra, except for the sonic virtues attributed to them, e.g. ... "especially strong bass " . But drums and the bass, the instruments themselves, never tend to hum.

screenshot_2020-10-273fj0q.png

Two-channel stereo system:

 

(valid for slimline floorstanding Speakers like e.g. Klipsch RF7´s, RF 82, RP 280F , RP 8000 and others not for Klipsch Heritage Line like Forte , CW , LaScala, KHorn )

 

Figure 1 shows a typical speaker arrangement for a two-channel stereo system.a good starting point would be to form an equilateral triangle of the speakers and your listening position.depending on the size of the room and the distribution arrangement of the furniture,it may be advisable to increase or decrease the distance between the listening position and the line between the two speakers,but maintain a center position with approximately equal distance to both speakers.this will ensure the best stereo effect.Turning the speakers far away from each other slightly inwards towards the listening position will still give a good stereo effect.

 

Stereo placement for wide sound reinforcement :

If you are primarily interested in hearing the sound from any position in the room, rather than just from a specific seating area, you can move the speakers on adjacent walls far apart to form a large "L", which does not produce a very good stereo effect, but gives you a room-filling, well-balanced sound.If you now draw an imaginary line from the center of the two horns, the axes meet behind the head.This also requires that the listening point  (sofa, couch, or easy chair) in the back area must have at least 3 feet or more distance from the imaginary back wall.

 

Regards MM

 

 

 

 

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9 hours ago, JoeJoeThe3rd said:

. I’ve already found how I like how they sound. Wanting to know if there’s a rule of thumb that sounds best for these speaker

 

The reason most people toe their speakers in is two-fold.  A lot of folks like the intensity that Klipsch speakers brings to the table.

 

The other and probably the majority opinion is imaging which @MicroMara ^^^ explained really well.  I know he explained  it really well because even I understood it!  🤣

+++

 

Seriously, if you have found a sound pleasing to your ears then then you are good to go.  I have located speakers in non-traditional placements before and have been surprised by how good they sound.  For instance, Khorns close to each other in the middle of a room, near field.  Magical!

 

And then there's this, my computer speakers.

 

5a5da46ced990_CF-4Computersetupright1.thumb.jpg.68053bc463f650c39d6fc1fc468dacc0.jpg

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'Clock' each speaker to your personal satisfaction... it's fairly simple, but it is a process.

There also seems to be a lot of disagreement on use of the boundary layer as reinforcement to low frequencies... some prefer the augmentation of a closely positioned speaker to a corner or a wall and some prefer the airiness of a speaker placed away from the wall's and corners. Of course as with all things, there are not simply black and white choices but shades of grey that involve using a mix of both ideologies.

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I use a test CD and a sound level meter to find the best distance between the speakers and the front wall.  Moving the speakers toward and away from the wall, you can find the spot that gives the smoothest bass response.  I found that by using a spectrum from 200 Hz down to 20 Hz, the La Scalas had the most even bass response when placed 3”-5” from the front wall.  Pulling them further from the wall added no benefits, it just made them take up more floor space.

 

At present, I have the JubScala IIs toed in slightly, with the inboard rear corners 5” from the front wall and the outboard rear corners 10” from the front wall.  They sound good like that, but I want to install something under the speakers that will allow me to shift them without much effort, in order to continue to experiment with their positioning, since ideas change over time, and there are no ultimates.

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On 12/12/2020 at 8:57 AM, wvu80 said:

 

 

The reason most people toe their speakers in is two-fold.  A lot of folks like the intensity that Klipsch speakers brings to the table.

 

The other and probably the majority opinion is imaging which @MicroMara ^^^ explained really well.  I know he explained  it really well because even I understood it!  🤣

+++

 

Seriously, if you have found a sound pleasing to your ears then then you are good to go.  I have located speakers in non-traditional placements before and have been surprised by how good they sound.  For instance, Khorns close to each other in the middle of a room, near field.  Magical!

 

And then there's this, my computer speakers.

 

5a5da46ced990_CF-4Computersetupright1.thumb.jpg.68053bc463f650c39d6fc1fc468dacc0.jpg

 

We really need a WOW!!! Emoji.

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7 hours ago, Islander said:

 

We really need a WOW!!! Emoji.

 

I had hair before I put those speakers up there. 

+++

 

The back story:  Most of us men are the picture takers.  Nobody ever takes pictures of us.

 

My buddy @mustang guy had just helped me pick up some Khorns which I got directly due to his kindness.  We had just moved the Khorns into the living room. 

 

I wanted him to hear my CF-4's so I went back to the Mancave to crank them up.  Craig had his camera and snapped that picture.  It's my favorite picture of me, thanks to Craig.

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You’re right.  Just look at any magazine stand.  Probably 90% of the persons on the covers are women.  On the other hand, women love to be photographed.  When I was working with a model a few years ago, I asked her why she did it, and her response was , “It makes me feel beautiful.”

 

When you consider the work (even surgery) that women put into looking good, it makes sense that they’d like anything that makes them feel all that work is worth it.

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On 12/11/2020 at 11:12 PM, JoeJoeThe3rd said:

I actually don’t really like how it sounded when I had them like that. And I use my rc64iii as my center a lot of the time when listening to music anyway so it would be basically pointless to have them set up like that since I’m using a center for music as well. And even without using a center I thought it Definitely took away from the entire experience and sound quality of them, but I didn’t mess with it that extensively and might try again. But from trying it I don’t see why people would listen to them like that from what I’ve learned what the benefits are suppose to be from having them set up like that I just didn’t see or hear any benefits.  I have the tweeters pointed about a foot or so away fro each shoulder, right speaker pointed like a foot or two to the right of my shoulder and so on. I found that sounds amazing. Really the way you have them set up is more forgiving than what people say for sure. Having then like that I get all the benefits of having them pointed straight at you but just a little smoother along with others. And then center imaging and entire soundstage is so on point and vaster than anything I’ve ever heard and they disappear immaculately/superfluously.

I have them about 110” apart from the middle of the tweeter to the middle of the other tweeter. and I sit about 135” away from them in my most comfortable listening position . I’ve already found how I like how they sound. Wanting to know if there’s a rule of thumb that sounds beat for these speaker. I have them perfectly symmetrical inside the room. And my room is 13 by 15 with a hallway that extends to the door to the bathroom making it 13 by about 20 with 8’ ceilings. With the way my room is I only have them about 16 inches away from the wall. Also, from the front of the tweeter is exactly 25” away from the side of the wall.  And I haven’t noticed any problems with it that distance or boomyness. But if I did move them out what benefits should I expect to notice in doing so. 

826254581_2020-12-1620_02_03.thumb.jpg.c31f5d8ee49a81cc5623c850ce210bdc.jpg

 

Does this look about right?

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Put your chair where you like it.

 

Start with the speakers about 10ft apart straight ahead.

 

As you move them out, keep toeing the speakers in towards your chair.

 

At some point the sound will lose cohesion, start moving them closer till good cohesion is achieved

 

You can then experiment with toeing the speakers out slightly from your chair

 

At some point you will lose the sweet spot etc.

 

On paper the subs are better in the corners, I have front firing Klipsch 12s. I like them in the center a few feet apart if 2, or off center if one, and forward of the TV if it's in the middle. They punch like Forman turned up.

 

A thick rug in the middle of the room is a giant plus

 

Bookshelves, a hanging rug or a thick curtain behind you is a plus

 

Stuffed furniture is a plus, as are open windows when you can

 

Suggest you do your testing with female vocal and a piano

 

IMHO reproduction of the female voice is the acid test which so many systems fail.

 

My new years promise is to begin going through books on CD to find a good female test voice with some range and depth.

 

 

My two quick test tracks are on CD:

 

Ronstadt Skylark, with the Nelson Riddle Orchestra, a lot of systems get an F in the first 30 seconds.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dzNmG_lpNw8

 

Poe (Jane) on Conjure One LP, "Make a wish" in many stereo show rooms Poe's voice almost disappears completely, as we switch from speaker to speaker using the same source and amp. It's electronica but the voice is hard to beat for testing. Tears from the Moon on same LP Sinead vocal is also good, but easier to reproduce, yet you should be able to hear the emotion.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw3-jaBIveM

 

Noemi Wolfs Hooverphonic

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zK-GC5y_adg&list=PLgugWBANrQyU39SWyIM6sCIJWo-A3GBlD&index=5

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Oox5S-HM74&list=PLgugWBANrQyU39SWyIM6sCIJWo-A3GBlD

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gVGCzTlT2hI&list=PLgugWBANrQyU39SWyIM6sCIJWo-A3GBlD&index=21

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mfbvtINc4iI

 

V2 Bigger than us radio interview in NL

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZwAA7lNKpd8

 

Nicks demo planets of the universe, Trouble in Shanghai almost every track has a great production and mastering, Crow helped nicks with the writing, recording and mastering, crow has a great ear..

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TNi0eWZiUDE

 

Once your system is dialed in; If you want to give it a workout, try Karma by Delerium

I'm not crazy about track 2, YMMV. karma is a sonic masterpiece IMHO

Track 1

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HEcJWgS6o_I

 

Entire Karma LP courtesy of Netwerk playlist

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HEcJWgS6o_I&list=PLnab4pCP1MZpSYIktQT6HM6d2bE-hHKT4

 

December, George Winston, Carol of the Bells, Track 5, 12 min

This will drive your amp to it's performance limit with rise and fall

Greatest recording ever made ?

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f5qGUhWPi6w

 

At 432 hz

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ne970dOcC-k

 

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