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bi-wiring


deadlift
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9 hours ago, Panelhead said:

  I have bi-wired, vertically biamped, and bridged my LS II. Never tried a single cable run with the jumpers.

 I prefer the vertically biamped. Should not make difference. But sounds better to me. 

What makes you say bi amping should not make any difference?

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5 minutes ago, ILI_MeloManiac said:

https://www.klipsch.com/blog/how-to-bi-amping-a-speaker

The way I see bi-amping making sense is with an active crossover. 

So your input signal passes through the active crossover which splits the signal in two (programmable), and then sends signal 1 to Amp 1 (for low frequencies) and signal 2 to Amp 2 (for high frequencies). 

Typically, Amp 1 would be a high watt amp, while Amp 2 would be delicate, low watt (tube) amp. 

By doing it like that, Amp 2 won't have two process the energy rich low frequencies. 

Yes and the two separate amps don't have to drive the reactive speaker level crossover components. The speakers although reactive loads in themselves are not as complicated a load as the speaker plus the crossover.

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My 2 cents.

Having tried bi-wiring and there is nothing to be gained unless there is a deficiency in the single set of cables. Have tried this with many different type/brands of cables over the years. But as of yet there has been no discernible difference from a single cable system. Now if we were talking about say 18ga wire and a 20 ft run......

 

 

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12 hours ago, deadlift said:

So assuming one had an extra set of identical speakers cables and wanted to try bi-wiring just for the heck of it - it may not make any difference, but one would be

doing no harm?

Yes absolutely no harm. Just don't forget to remove the jumpers on the back of the speaker. Otherwise you are doing nothing:)

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18 hours ago, Frontino said:

Would it be dangerous if I connected the amplifier's left channel + and - at the top posts of a single loudspeaker and the right channel + and - at the lower posts of the same speaker while keeping the dual posts bridged?

Welcome to the Forum!.

 

Dangerous? No. I don't even thing you would do any damage to either the amp or the speaker, it's a summed mono signal I would think because they are bridged. 

 

You won't be able to tell anything in terms of the sound of bi-amping. Depending on the music, how recorded, etc. you are summing the R + L and if their is any difference in phase between the L+R, it could sound horrible.

 

I would wait for a more technical expert to answer this question, I would be more concerned about the amp than the speaker and whether the amp is going to be seeing a quite different impedance. 

 

Travis 

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1 hour ago, dwilawyer said:

 I would be more concerned about the amp / the amp is going to be seeing a quite different impedance.

Correct -

-In Bridged Mono ,  the amp works in a push/ pull configuration , both channels works together and against each other -

The Bridged mono connections of the Stereo amp  have now yielded 4 x the watts , so the amp is working  4 x as hard in an impedance which is now only 4 Ohms   -

The Stereo amp's components in Bridged Mono are now working 16 times as hard -

 

 

 

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20 hours ago, Frontino said:

Would it be dangerous if I connected the amplifier's left channel + and - at the top posts of a single loudspeaker and the right channel + and - at the lower posts of the same speaker while keeping the dual posts bridged?

If I understand what you are asking YES it would be bad to do this. You are shorting two amplifier outputs together. DO NOT DO THIS.

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  Rather than “bridge “ this way. Use a balanced source. Make a cable with balanced connector on one end and a RCA with the + output and ground. Connect another RCA with - and shield. So a cable with XLR or TRS on one end and two RCA connectors on the other end. 

  I always connect + to left and - to right. Input and output. Connect the speaker cables to the red connectors. Not to the black. So + speaker to left red post and negative speaker connection to right red post.

Mono amps, you now have a balanced differential amplifier. Four times the output power. A 8 ohm speaker is seen as 4 ohms. A four ohm speaker is seen by amplifier as 2 ohm. 

  But at Klipsch power levels most amplifiers will be fine. Output impedance is doubled. Voltage swing is doubled. Rise time doubles in volts/msec.

  Does not always sound better.

  I used these to bridge a pair of Micromega MyAmps.BB09AE1A-6F35-46F9-8F7C-93987AD6F8D0.thumb.jpeg.230408c51848dd7f5086c5a361734e63.jpeg

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On 12/25/2020 at 2:13 AM, Frontino said:

Would it be dangerous if I connected the amplifier's left channel + and - at the top posts of a single loudspeaker and the right channel + and - at the lower posts of the same speaker while keeping the dual posts bridged?

If I understand the question, yes. With a solid state amp it will let out the smoke stored in the output devices. With a transformer coupled amp, will not play very well. 

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On 12/16/2020 at 11:33 PM, babadono said:

What makes you say bi amping should not make any difference?

  Vertical biamping. But at normal listening levels on a LS separating the bass from  the mid/tweeter may be audible. The bass generates back EMF. It should be swamped by the low output impedance. But with output running a few mW it may disturb the signal. 

  With vertical biamping the other channel that drives the mid/tweeter is not connected to the bass crossover. 

  All I can tell is it sounds better than a single stereo amp. Not sure why.

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10 hours ago, Panelhead said:

  Vertical biamping. But at normal listening levels on a LS separating the bass from  the mid/tweeter may be audible. The bass generates back EMF. It should be swamped by the low output impedance. But with output running a few mW it may disturb the signal. 

  With vertical biamping the other channel that drives the mid/tweeter is not connected to the bass crossover. 

  All I can tell is it sounds better than a single stereo amp. Not sure why.

So this is with still using the crossovers in the speakers?

 

 

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On 12/17/2020 at 12:32 AM, ILI_MeloManiac said:

https://www.klipsch.com/blog/how-to-bi-amping-a-speaker

The way I see bi-amping making sense is with an active crossover. 

So your input signal passes through the active crossover which splits the signal in two (programmable), and then sends signal 1 to Amp 1 (for low frequencies) and signal 2 to Amp 2 (for high frequencies). 

Typically, Amp 1 would be a high watt amp, while Amp 2 would be delicate, low watt (tube) amp. 

By doing it like that, Amp 2 won't have two process the energy rich low frequencies. 

This is how my system is set up with KPT-942 and soon to be KPT-942/4. My crossovers are separated for HF and Mid HF “most would call LF” and are in-line after the source and before the separate preamps. The HF has tube preamp & tube mono amps to each 402 driver. The LF has a SS preamp and separate Class A amps to the drivers of the 904 drivers. I gain balance the separate preamps and use my DAC attenuation as the master and the separate preamps as slaves. 

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