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happyears88

Klipsch Forte hole in spider

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Hello,

 

I am a klutz and accidentally stabbed a hole in the spider of the woofer on my Klipsch Forte I with a screwdriver.  It is on the edge where there won't be any movement so I'm hoping this doesn't have any impact, but I don't know much about speakers so wanted to check.  Does the spider need to be airtight, or is it fine for there to be a hole?  Do you think I should seal it up, maybe with epoxy?  Thanks!!

klipsch_hole.jpg

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10 hours ago, happyears88 said:

Hello,

 

I am a klutz and accidentally stabbed a hole in the spider of the woofer on my Klipsch Forte I with a screwdriver.  It is on the edge where there won't be any movement so I'm hoping this doesn't have any impact, but I don't know much about speakers so wanted to check.  Does the spider need to be airtight, or is it fine for there to be a hole?  Do you think I should seal it up, maybe with epoxy?  Thanks!!

klipsch_hole.jpg


Wecome to the Forum. The repair you suggested will most likely be okay. If not, it needed replaced anyway...

 

*<;o)

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10 hours ago, happyears88 said:

 hole in the spider of the woofer

You must repair the hole , since the spider is needed for the centering of the voice coil while the cone is moving by pressure  , and to avoid getting dirt inside the voice coil ,  the repair can be done in 2 steps --------1st take a very fine sewing needle and with nylon thread   ,  sew the torn fabric area edge to edge   , then apply very little silicone caulking or epoxy  to cover the stitches  -

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you dont need to sew that small hole.  it would probably be ok as is since there is no real "dirt" inside the speaker cabinet & that small of a hole doesnt affect the voice coil alignment... put a dab of silicone or RTV gasket sealant on it & it will be fine. 

 

my question is how in the heck did you stab it with a screwdriver?  there are no screws anywhere near the spider.   

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That stuff just happens sometimes. I have had my share of slip-ups too.   :)

 

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Welcome to the forum.

 

Don’t feel bad, some of us has done it too including me. It’s part of the hobby when you’re hands on. I’d cut a piece of paper towel a little bigger than the hole, then put white Elmer’s glue on the paper towel, then put it over the hole like a patch. You want the paper towel piece to be evenly covered with glue, but not excessively or overly glued.  Push it all down so it’s all in contact, flat, and neat. It can be moved around some while the glue is wet to get it on correct placement and neatly, but try not to move it around too much. Get it on the best you can during first contact. Try not to get glue inside the spider. Let dry before using. Once the glue drys, you have a good strong repair.

 

I repair torn speaker cones using this method. On thin small speakers I use only one layer, some papers towels are two layers, so I divide them using only one. I sometimes put the glue on both sides of the paper towel if needed and sometimes use two layers of paper towels if needed, but mostly don’t need two double layers. I usually do it on the back side of cones, so you can’t see the repair, unless it’s a large and bad cut or hole, then I’ll do it on both sides of the cone. It works for me and for those I repaired speakers were very happy with their repaired speakers at no cost. This can also be attempted when the speaker is bad enough to not be playable from its damage, or until a new replacement arrives.

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I like soundbound's solution. See if you can flatten out the dent made with the screwdriver puncture. You could use a small scrap of woven fabric similar to the spider, saturate it with glue ala soundbound's method, then when in place flatten it down with a small acid brush or paint brush.

 

The spider is really just a spring to control the speaker travel.

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Thanks so much everyone!  And sorry I've been MIA.  I'm going to try the method suggested by soundbound and Peter P.

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