Jump to content
The Klipsch Audio Community
MeloManiac

Would you want a revived 'original' Klipsch Heritage line?

Would you want a revived 'original' Klipsch Heritage line?  

33 members have voted

  1. 1. In the previous century, the BBC wrote out a specs sheet and allowed 11 or twelf UK speaker companies to build these studio monitors to the highest specs. In the 21st century, one company (Rogers) decided to revive these speaker according to their original specs: the Rogers LS3/5A revived vintage speakers. They are made in the UK and cost around €3,300 https://www.rogers-hifi.uk/rogers-ls35a-classic-speakers https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/LS3/5A POLL QUESTION: Would you appreciate Klipsch doing the same? eg build the original Heresy (or Klipschorn) according to its original specs?

    • Yes
      7
    • No
      26
  2. 2. What model would you prefer 'revived' to original specs?

    • Heresy
      1
    • Klipschorn
      0
    • Forte
      2
    • Cornwall
      3
    • La Scala
      6
    • None of the above
      21


Recommended Posts

On 4/10/2021 at 10:08 AM, RandyH000 said:

these look like 1977  given the laser badge  -what is that red finish ?  on these CW Decorators----is that a stain , or a veneer ,

When I had them refinished, I bought new badges. The originals didn't look as good with the new color. Originally, they arrived unfinished and were rubbed with linseed oil. Fast forward 20something years, the linseed oil had yellowed while in storage. I had them refinished as you see them. No veneers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, ChrisK said:

 I had them refinished as you see them. No veneers.

so what's the red  finish then  , a stain or a type of oil -----

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/15/2021 at 10:26 AM, Bacek said:

"eg build the original Heresy (or Klipschorn) according to its original specs"

 

But what does it mean original specs? For Klipshorn exact set of drivers and horns from 1947? Not sure it's possible and it makes sense.

 

You have a point because the Rogers are 1970s speakers, while the Klipschorns are quite a bit older. 

 

The small Rogers are somewhat popular in Japan because they fit in small flats over there... If the US is bigger than life, then Japan is all about miniaturisation: they are small bookshelves, 15 ohm, so accepting small amps too. 1947 revived original Khorns would cost a fortune for their size alone, I guess. Rogers built 3x 70 sets for Japan, Europe and ROW, rest of world... Can you imagine how 'exclusive' they are.... 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Unlike the other brands listed the Klipsch Heritage line is the one of the few maybe only that has been in constant production. There are tons of original spec models on the market still. The others need to be revived because they truly went the way of the dinosauer.

 

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

With BBC specifications, it is the case that not all manufacturers and all decades of production are comparable. There are specifications, but they are sometimes interpreted within the margins or even exceeded. I have Stirling Broadcast LS3/5V2 built and licensed to BBC specifications. Still, they sound somewhat different than old Rogers, for example. You can't put two LS3/5a from different manufacturers or decades left and right together to make a pair. 

Back to Klipsch. As I write this I am listening to my beloved 1977 Lascala. I think it would be foolish to build new Klipsch that sound like these old darlings.Today there are other recordings, other music, other generations of ears. Still, I maintain that old Chet Baker or Bill Evans records sound subjectively better to me on these old speakers. 
But new recordings sound better on new versions. Another point. It would be nonsense to prescribe a fingerprint of a 1970 sound and build a new speaker to sound like it. 

But there are basic things to consider. Does a new Lascala sound better for any music? Does it sound as good as the old Lascala all the way down? Does the thin outer wall of the old Lascala perhaps sound better on a cello because it resonates more and is more lively? I mean yes. But isn't the same thin outer wall a big problem in dry pop recordings where resonances are more likely to interfere? I mean yes as well. 

This leads to the very old fundamental question, regardless of the age of the speakers...is there one speaker that does everything equally well?

I have also Jubilees since 13 years. But for some recordings I like more the way how a smaller speaker integrates my room more. No matter how very good the Jubilees sound regardless. Isn't it nice how much you can get into it all:)

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As long as Klipsch continues working to improve the existing models, there's no reason to go back.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, RandyH000 said:

so what's the red  finish then  , a stain or a type of oil -----

They were stained. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I voted no, but then after thinking about I would for research purposes.

Sent from my SM-G986U using Tapatalk

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...