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Bicycle Tires


Edgar
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Hey, folks, I know that there are several bicyclists here on the Forum. It's time for some new clincher tires for my Fuji Altamira, and I'm looking for suggestions. The frame won't allow for anything larger than a 700 x 25c. Roads around here range from OK to pathetic, and these tires have to support my 225 lb carcass without puncturing or giving me snake-bite flats.

 

My favorite tires of all time were the old Avocet Fasgrip slicks, so if anything can come close to that kind of road feel I'd be very happy.

 

Thanks,

Greg

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1 hour ago, Edgar said:

Hey, folks, I know that there are several bicyclists here on the Forum. It's time for some new clincher tires for my Fuji Altamira, and I'm looking for suggestions. The frame won't allow for anything larger than a 700 x 25c. Roads around here range from OK to pathetic, and these tires have to support my 225 lb carcass without puncturing or giving me snake-bite flats.

 

My favorite tires of all time were the old Avocet Fasgrip slicks, so if anything can come close to that kind of road feel I'd be very happy.

 

Thanks,

Greg

Bike Tires | Bicycle Tires | Bicycle Warehouse

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Not sure about the Avocet's, but you can't go wrong in my experience with Continentals. Maybe Michelin's or Vittoria's. I've mostly ran Continentals, super sport series tires, with good results. Offer decent bang for the buck, and generally very durable. As to your other questions, 700x23 if you are riding on the road (21's are too narrow and 19's way to narrow, and might not fit on your rims anyway). Number one cause (only cause) of pinch flats (snake bite as you say) is improper tire pressure (or maybe hitting a huge pothole, which will give you a flat no matter what). Make sure you have a good pump with a gauge, and check the pressure before EVERY ride (e.g. if they are rated 120 PSI max, run them at least 100 or more). If you happen to be riding on trails (e.g. limestone), then go with the 700x25's. You should be able to find decent durable tires for around $25-35 per tire, maybe less. If punctures are of concern, it might be beneficial to seek a kevlar belt, but even that's no guarantee against a puncture. Best to carry a spare tube, tire levers, pump or co2 if you aren't already. Good luck.

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3 minutes ago, Sam S. said:

Not sure about the Avocet's

 

Out of production for decades, now.

 

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but you can't go wrong in my experience with Continentals. Maybe Michelin's or Vittoria's.

 

Currently running Vittoria. They're just OK. Zero road feel. Have never run Conti or Michelin, except on my motorcycle, so that's not really any kind of comparison.

 

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As to your other questions, 700x23 if you are riding on the road (21's are too narrow and 19's way to narrow, and might not fit on your rims anyway). Number one cause (only cause) of pinch flats (snake bite as you say) is improper tire pressure (or maybe hitting a huge pothole, which will give you a flat no matter what).

 

There actually wasn't an other question. On my old Waterford Paramount, I always ran 700x25 on the front and 700x28 on the rear -- necessary given my weight. But anything larger than 700x25 on my current Fuji rubs the brake bridge, so I run 700x25 front and rear.

 

I inflate to 100+ psi, but still occasionally get a pinch flat due to my weight and the miserable condition of some of the roads around here. (You don't always have time to bunny-hop a pot hole, or even rise out of the saddle enough to unload the tires, especially in a paceline if the leaders don't bother to point out road hazards.)

 

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Best to carry a spare tube, tire levers, pump or co2 if you aren't already. Good luck.

 

Yes, thanks, I'm well versed in flat repair, out of sheer necessity. Been riding for over 55 years.

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Posted (edited)
53 minutes ago, tromprof said:

Long time cyclist and triathlete. I never skimp on tires having let a pair go a little too long and lost grip in the mountains resulting on a broken elbow.

 

For competition I agree, but my racing days are 35 years and 35 pounds in the past.  🙁  Age is starting to catch up with me, but I still try to push hard.

 

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Michelin is the best IMO. Not the cheapest however.

 

Thanks for your suggestion. Yes, in fact I've been looking at the Michelin Lithion 2. I measured the clearance between the rim and the rear brake bridge, and it's only 27 mm, give or take a millimeter measurement error. I'm finding that many 700x25c tires are taller than that, so my selection is even more limited than I thought. The Pro 4 Service Course that you mentioned looks to be a really nice tire, but at 26 mm height it's just too close for comfort.

 

EDIT: Just measured the front clearance -- it's even less, at 26 mm.

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40 minutes ago, Edgar said:

 

For competition I agree, but my racing days are 35 years and 35 pounds in the past.  🙁  Age is starting to catch up with me, but I still try to push hard.

 

 

Thanks for your suggestion. Yes, in fact I've been looking at the Michelin Lithion 2. I measured the clearance between the rim and the rear brake bridge, and it's only 27 mm, give or take a millimeter measurement error. I'm finding that many 700x25c tires are taller than that, so my selection is even more limited than I thought. The Pro 4 Service Course that you mentioned looks to be a really nice tire, but at 26 mm height it's just too close for comfort.

 

EDIT: Just measured the front clearance -- it's even less, at 26 mm.

 

Tire makers are extremely inconsistent in how they measure tires. I have a set of 25mm Specialized tires that are much fatter than my 25mm Michelin so you may run into issues with some brands if you are close to the biggest that will fit.

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On not so good roads I use Continental GatorSkin (or whatever a new iteration is called).

 

They are harder to puncture, great tire for such roads and made in Germany. Never had a problem with mine.

Just have in mind that Continental is making roughly a 1mm wider tires then the rest of manufacturers. So if they say 25mm they are more like 26mm. Not that it maters much, bit if you have a tight space in the fork you might consider this info useful.

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11 minutes ago, parlophone1 said:

On not so good roads I use Continental GatorSkin (or whatever a new iteration is called).

 

Thanks. Fantastic puncture resistance https://www.bicyclerollingresistance.com/road-bike-reviews/continental-gatorskin-2015. Not quite as wide or tall as the Michelin Lithion 2. I'm not sure whether to go for the puncture resistance of the Conti or the comfort of the Michelin. The season is still young.

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Never rode on Michelin, but GatorSkin is plenty comfortable to me.

Just adjust the tire pressure to your weight and it is very supple on your behind.

Just for reference, on my fixed bicycle I ride on Conti GrandSport race. It is ranked below GatorSkin in Conti lineup and made in China. Bought them on a discount. Good tire, but more "rubbery". And to my opinion not as comfortable as GatorSkin, pretty close but not there exactly there.

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I love S-works turbos for comfort and speed, but they are not the most durable. Of course with Specialized there is an S-works tax, but usually this time of year they do a BOGO sale. You can't beat Gatorskins for durability but they are hard as a rock IMO. I would like to check out Pirelli tires, perhaps this summer. The Michelins you are looking at may be a good compromise. Let us know what you end up with and your opinion of them. Good Luck and stay safe out there!

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Update: I bought the Michelin Lithion 2 for US$27 from Jenson USA. Just installed the rear tire -- it fits, with only 2½ mm to spare. (So when I hit 100 mph or so the tire might expand enough to rub.)

 

Haven't done a test ride, yet.

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Weather finally cooperated enough to get in a short ride. Compared to the Zaffiro that it replaced, the Lithion is downright plush. Accidentaly hit some pot holes and didn't puncture, so I'll take that as a good sign.

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  • 2 months later...

Another update. I've been riding on the Lithion 2 for a while, now. The tire has a nice feel, especially compared to the Zaffiro. But I've kept track, and I've averaged one flat every 50 miles on the obstacle courses that pass for roads around here. ☹️

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