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AL-3, AA, etc. Xover Caps


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Is there any kind of reference chart  that'll tell me which Jantzen, Clarity, etc. caps are used for the AL-3 or AA xovers? It seems I have brand new leftover caps pertaining to different Klipsch speakers that have no homes. I'd be nice if I knew what caps went to the various boards on Khorns, Lascala's and Belle's. Hate to buy replacement caps if I already have them.

The only think I have to go by are the microfarad/voltage readings between old and new caps. Is that enough? Still learning how to do this.

 

Thanks!  

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For simplicity, yes, you can go by uF/voltage. 

 

Cap types have different characteristics (electrolytic vs film, etc.), but you've got to learn and get started somewhere, so use what you can and keep tweaking it until you are satisfied and have learned more. 

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I have noticed that most all caps are electrolytic. I've also noticed they're less expensive that film caps. Since non-electrolytic capacitors are a more durable capacitor, I wonder, why not use them instead?

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13 hours ago, Tony T said:

I have noticed that most all caps are electrolytic. I've also noticed they're less expensive that film caps. Since non-electrolytic capacitors are a more durable capacitor, I wonder, why not use them instead?

 

not sure what you mean by that, where do you see most all caps are electrolytic?  the caps for mid & tweet circuits arent electrolytic in any of the klipsch speakers i have owned or seen, AK/AL-3,  AA, & all the forte/chorus or other models of that era use a mylar type cap.  most aftermarket upgrade caps are polypropylene or other type.  

 

yes you can match the values on the stock caps & decide what type you want to use.   

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All you need to do is match capacitance and make sure to voltage rating is 100V or greater.  One hundred volts into 8 ohms is 1250 watts. 

 

Yes, most capacitors for sale are electrolytic, because they are cheap and and small.  For an audio circuit they tend to (perhaps subtly) change the waveform passing through them more than other caps and that is undesirsable. 

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On 8/3/2021 at 9:42 AM, EpicKlipschFan said:

 

not sure what you mean by that, where do you see most all caps are electrolytic?  the caps for mid & tweet circuits aren't electrolytic in any of the Klipsch speakers i have owned or seen, AK/AL-3,  AA, & all the forte/chorus or other models of that era use a mylar type cap.  most aftermarket upgrade caps are polypropylene or other type.  

 

yes you can match the values on the stock caps & decide what type you want to use. 

 

Still I wonder, why not bypass Electrolytic AND Mylar capacitors all together? My understanding tells me Mylar caps do make a significant sound improvement although, they're considered minimum quality audio capacitors when used in an audio signal path.

 

True or False?

Better are polypropylene capacitors, and even better are polycarbonate capacitors when available.

 

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